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International criminal law

See below for a selection of the latest books from International criminal law category. Presented with a red border are the International criminal law books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great International criminal law books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Amicus Curiae in International Criminal Justice

The Amicus Curiae in International Criminal Justice

Author: Sarah Williams, Hannah Woolaver, Emma Palmer Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/02/2020

The amicus curiae - or friend of the court - is the main mechanism for actors other than the parties, including civil society actors and States, to participate directly in proceedings in international criminal tribunals. Yet increasing reliance on this mechanism raises a number of questions. Are amicus interventions consistent with the inherent structure and purpose of a criminal trial? What impact might they have on the efficiency of trials, fair trial rights and the quality of judicial decision-making? Do amici enhance the representation of different interests in international criminal proceedings? Are amicus submissions actually influencing judicial or other outcomes? Is there a trend towards `non-traditional' uses of the amicus curiae, such as the amicus curiae prosecutor or amici as substitute defence counsel? These questions suggest issues integral to the legitimacy of international criminal trials and institutions, namely: who is able to be represented in proceedings, which actors seek to intervene in trials and why, whether the amicus curiae is an appropriate avenue for certain types of submissions, and what responsibilities might amici hold. This important new book examines the practice of international criminal tribunals and offers suggestions for the role of the amicus curiae before such tribunals.

Disputed Territories and International Criminal Law Israeli Settlements and the International Criminal Court

Disputed Territories and International Criminal Law Israeli Settlements and the International Criminal Court

Author: Simon McKenzie Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/12/2019

It has been just over 50 years since the beginning of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian Territories. It is estimated that there are over 600,000 Israeli settlers living in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, and they are supported, protected and maintained by the Israeli state. This book discusses whether international criminal law could apply to those individuals responsible for allowing for and promoting this growth. It also examines what this application would reveal about the operation of international criminal law. It provides a comprehensive analysis of how the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) could apply to the settlements in the West Bank through a close examination of the potential operation of two relevant Statute crimes: first, the war crime of transfer of population; and second, the war crime of unlawful appropriation of property. It also addresses the threshold question of whether the law of occupation applies to the West Bank, and how the principles of individual criminal responsibility might operate in this context. It explores the relevance and coherence of the legal arguments relied on by Israel in defence of the legality of the settlements, and considers how these arguments might apply in the context of the Rome Statute. The work also has wider aims, raising questions about the Rome Statute's capacity to meet its aim of establishing a coherent and legally effective system of international criminal justice.

Africa and International Criminal Justice Radical Evils and the International Criminal Court

Africa and International Criminal Justice Radical Evils and the International Criminal Court

Author: Fred Aja Agwu Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/12/2019

This book provides an overview of crimes under international law, radical evils, in a number of African states. This overview informs a critical analysis of the debates surrounding the African Union's call for withdrawal from the International Criminal Court and proposes a way forward with a more pertinent role for the Court. The work critically analyzes the arguments around withdrawal from the ICC and the extension of the jurisdiction of the African Court into criminal matters. It is held that this was not intended in the spirit of complementarity as envisaged by the Rome Statute, and is subject to political calculation and manipulation by national governments. Recasting the ICC as a court of second instance would provide a stronger institutional and jurisdictional regime. The book will be a valuable resource for students, academics, and policymakers working in the areas of international humanitarian law, international criminal law, African studies, and genocide studies.

International Law and Transnational Organized Crime

International Law and Transnational Organized Crime

Author: Anne Wade Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2019

International Law and Transnational Organized Crime brings to the notice of the readers the various kinds of organized crimes that occur and take place across the nations and the international laws that are framed for these crimes. It provides the readers with complete understanding of the transnational crimes and the international laws that have been framed for their control. This book also discusses about the formation of international law, the meaning of internationally organized crime, the impact of such crimes on the states and societies, the role of terrorism in such crimes, various kinds of crimes such as corruption, anti-money laundering and so on and the international perspective on such crimes.

Punishing Atrocities through a Fair Trial International Criminal Law from Nuremberg to the Age of Global Terrorism

Punishing Atrocities through a Fair Trial International Criminal Law from Nuremberg to the Age of Global Terrorism

Author: Jonathan (Seton Hall University, New Jersey) Hafetz Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/11/2019

Over the past decades, international criminal law has evolved to become the operative norm for addressing the worst atrocities. Tribunals have conducted hundreds of trials addressing mass violence in the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, and other countries to bring to justice perpetrators of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. But international courts have struggled to hold perpetrators accountable for these offenses while still protecting the fair trial rights of defendants. Punishing Atrocities through a Fair Trial explores this tension, from criticism of the Nuremberg Trials as 'victor's justice' to the accusations of political motivations clouding prosecutions today by the International Criminal Court. It explains why international criminal law must adhere to transparent principles of legality and due process to ensure its future as a legitimate and viable legal regime.

The Concept of Gravity in the Statute of the International Criminal Court Jurisdiction, Admissibility and Sentencing

The Concept of Gravity in the Statute of the International Criminal Court Jurisdiction, Admissibility and Sentencing

Author: Triestino (Edge Hill University, UK) Mariniello Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/11/2019

The concept of gravity permeates the entire Rome Statute, and has a key role with regard to different phases of the proceedings before the ICC. Despite this significance, the Rome Statute does not provide any clarifications of the content of gravity and its constitutive factors. This omission is one of the reasons for the harshest criticisms against the ICC, which has been accused of African bias and of neglecting international crimes allegedly committed by nationals from powerful countries. This book presents a considered evaluation of the role of gravity in international criminal justice. It develops a unified theory of gravity, which can be applied to the different stages of the proceedings before the ICC. Undertaking a critical legal analysis of the law and practice of the ICC, it also draws on relevant jurisprudence of other international or internationalized criminal tribunals, as well as on the documents of the International Law Commission. The critical methodology constitutes an indispensable instrument in outlining the possibilities for the refinement and improvement of the Court's practice in future cases. It is argued that it is necessary to explore the challenges posed by the ICC's normative system in relation to the central concept of gravity. In this regard, the critical approach adopted here differs from that followed by a part of academic literature, which is inclined to opt for the abolition of every form of international criminal justice as an expression of neo-imperialistic dominance. In contrast, the methodology adopted here does not propose an a priori rejection of the ICC's normative framework. Indeed, while retaining a strong critical orientation, the internal analysis of this normative framework aims to clarify the content of gravity in the different stages of the proceedings before the Court.

The Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court

The Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court

Author: Victor Tsilonis Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/10/2019

The book provides a holistic examination of the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC). The main focus is placed on the three pillars which form the ICC's foundation pursuant to the Rome Statute: the preconditions to the exercise of its jurisdiction (Article 12 Rome Statute) the substantive competence, i.e. the core crimes (Article 5-8bis Rome Statute, i.e. genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression) the principle of complementarity (Article 171 (a) Rome Statute) The latter governs the ICC's `ultimate jurisdiction', since it is not merely sufficient for a crime to be within the Court's jurisdiction (according to the substantive, geographical, personal and temporal jurisdictional criteria), but the State Party must also be unwilling or unable genuinely to carry out the investigation or prosecution. Finally yet importantly, the main `negative preconditions' for the Court's jurisdiction, i.e. immunities (Article 27 Rome Statute) and exceptions via Security Council referrals are thoroughly examined.The book is an excellent resource for scholars as well as practitioners and notably contributes to the existing literature.

The First Global Prosecutor Promise and Constraints

The First Global Prosecutor Promise and Constraints

Author: Martha Minow Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/10/2019

The establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) gave rise to the first permanent Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), with independent powers of investigation and prosecution. Elected in 2003 for a nine-year term as the ICC's first Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo established policies and practices for when and how to investigate, when to pursue prosecution, and how to obtain the cooperation of sovereign nations. He laid a foundation for the OTP's involvement with the United Nations Security Council, state parties, nongovernmental organizations, victims, the accused, witnesses, and the media. This volume of essays presents the first sustained examination of this unique office and offers a rare look into international justice. The contributors, ranging from legal scholars to practitioners of international law, explore the spectrum of options available to the OTP, the particular choices Moreno Ocampo made, and issues ripe for consideration as his successor, Fatou B. Bensouda, assumes her duties. The beginning ofBensouda's term thus offers the perfect opportunity to examine the first Prosecutor's singular efforts to strengthen international justice, in all its facets.

Habeas Corpus in Wartime From the Tower of London to Guantanamo Bay

Habeas Corpus in Wartime From the Tower of London to Guantanamo Bay

Author: Amanda L. (Professor of Law, Professor of Law, Berkeley Law, University of California) Tyler Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/10/2019

Habeas Corpus in Wartime unearths and presents a comprehensive account of the legal and political history of habeas corpus in wartime in the Anglo-American legal tradition. The book begins by tracing the origins of the habeas privilege in English law, giving special attention to the English Habeas Corpus Act of 1679, which limited the scope of executive detention and used the machinery of the English courts to enforce its terms. It also explores the circumstances that led Parliament to invent the concept of suspension as a tool for setting aside the protections of the Habeas Corpus Act in wartime. Turning to the United States, the book highlights how the English suspension framework greatly influenced the development of early American habeas law before and after the American Revolution and during the Founding period, when the United States Constitution enshrined a habeas privilege in its Suspension Clause. The book then chronicles the story of the habeas privilege and suspension over the course of American history, giving special attention to the Civil War period. The final chapters explore how the challenges posed by modern warfare during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have placed great strain on the previously well-settled understanding of the role of the habeas privilege and suspension in American constitutional law, particularly during World War II when the United States government detained tens of thousands of Japanese American citizens and later during the War on Terror. Throughout, the book draws upon a wealth of original and heretofore untapped historical resources to shed light on the purpose and role of the Suspension Clause in the United States Constitution, revealing all along that many of the questions that arise today regarding the scope of executive power to arrest and detain in wartime are not new ones.

Some Kind of Justice The ICTY's Impact in Bosnia and Serbia

Some Kind of Justice The ICTY's Impact in Bosnia and Serbia

An internationally-renowned scholar in the fields of international and transitional justice, Diane Orentlicher provides an unparalleled account of an international tribunal's impact in societies that have the greatest stake in its work. In Some Kind of Justice: The ICTY's Impact in Bosnia and Serbia, Orentlicher explores the evolving domestic impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), which operated longer than any other international war crimes court. Drawing on hundreds of research interviews and a rich body of inter-disciplinary scholarship, Orentlicher provides a path-breaking account of how the Tribunal influenced domestic political developments, victims' experience of justice, acknowledgement of wartime atrocities, and domestic war crimes prosecutions, as well as the dynamic factors behind its evolving influence in each of these spheres. Highlighting the perspectives of Bosnians and Serbians, Some Kind of Justice offers important and practical lessons about how international criminal courts can improve the delivery of justice.

The Vietnam War and International Law, Volume 3 The Widening Context

The Vietnam War and International Law, Volume 3 The Widening Context

Author: Richard A. Falk Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/10/2019

Issues of the war that have provoked public controversy and legal debate over the last two years--the Cambodian invasion of May-June 1970, the disclosure in November 1969 of the My Lai massacre, and the question of war crimes--are the focus of Volume 3. As in the previous volumes, the Civil War Panel of the American Society of International Law has endeavored to select the most significant legal writing on the subject and to provide, to the extent possible, a balanced presentation of opposing points of view. Parts I and II deal directly with the Cambodian, My Lai, and war crimes debates. Related questions are treated in the rest of the volume: constitutional debate on the war; the distribution of functions among coordinate branches of the government; the legal status of the insurgent regime in the struggle for control of South Vietnam; prospects for settlement without a clear-cut victory; and Vietnam's role in general world order. The articles reflect the views of some forty contributors: among them, Jean Lacouture, Henry Kissinger, John Norton Moore, Quincy Wright, William H. Rhenquist, and Richard A. Falk. Originally published in 1972. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Slave Trade, Abolition and the Long History of International Criminal Law The Recaptive and the Victim

The Slave Trade, Abolition and the Long History of International Criminal Law The Recaptive and the Victim

Author: Emily Haslam Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/10/2019

Modern international criminal law typically traces its origins to the twentieth-century Nuremberg and Tokyo trials, excluding the slave trade and abolition. Yet, as this book shows, the slave trade and abolition resound in international criminal law in multiple ways. Its central focus lies in a close examination of the often-controversial litigation, in the first part of the nineteenth century, arising from British efforts to capture slave ships, much of it before Mixed Commissions. With archival-based research into this litigation, it explores the legal construction of so-called 'recaptives' (slaves found on board captured slave ships). The book argues that, notwithstanding its promise of freedom, the law actually constructed recaptives restrictively. In particular, it focused on questions of intervention rather than recaptives' rights. At the same time it shows how a critical reading of the archive reveals that recaptives contributed to litigation in important, but hitherto largely unrecognized, ways. The book is, however, not simply a contribution to the history of international law. Efforts to deliver justice through international criminal law continue to face considerable challenges and raise testing questions about the construction - and alternative construction - of victims. By inscribing the recaptive in international criminal legal history, the book offers an original contribution to these contentious issues and a reflection on critical international criminal legal history writing and its accompanying methodological and political choices.