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International criminal law

See below for a selection of the latest books from International criminal law category. Presented with a red border are the International criminal law books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great International criminal law books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Right to a Fair Trial in International Law

The Right to a Fair Trial in International Law

The Right to a Fair Trial in International Law brings together the diverse sources of international law that define the right to a fair trial in the context of criminal (as opposed to civil, administrative or other) proceedings. The book provides a comprehensive explanation of what the right to a fair trial means in practice under international law and focuses on factual scenarios that practitioners and judges in court face. Each of the book's fifteen chapters deal with one component of the right to a fair trial as defined in Article 14 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Highlighting both consensus and divisions in the international jurisprudence in this area, this book provides a valuable resource to practitioners and scholars dealing with breaches of one of the most fundamental human rights.

An Introduction to the International Criminal Court

An Introduction to the International Criminal Court

Author: William A. (Middlesex University, London) Schabas Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2020

This is the authoritative introduction to the International Criminal Court, fully updated in this sixth edition. The book covers the legal framework of the Court, the cases that it has heard and that are still to come, and the political debates surrounding its operation. It is written by one of the major authorities on the subject, in language accessible to non-specialists. The sixth edition brings legal references fully up to date in light of the Court's case law. Several trials have now been completed, with four convictions and a number of controversial acquittals. The book also discusses the situations that the Court is currently investigating, including Palestine, Georgia, Ukraine, Venezuela and the UK in Iraq, as well as the decision by a Pre-Trial Chamber not to authorise an investigation into Afghanistan. It also looks into the crisis with African states and the hostility of the United States to the institution.

An Introduction to Transitional Justice

An Introduction to Transitional Justice

Author: Olivera (Griffith University, Melbourne, Australia) Simic Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2020

The second edition of An Introduction to Transitional Justice provides a comprehensive overview of transitional justice judicial and non-judicial measures implemented by societies to redress legacies of massive human rights abuse. Written by some of the leading experts in the field it takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach to the subject, addressing the dominant transitional justice mechanisms as well as key themes and challenges faced by scholars and practitioners. Using a wide historic and geographic range of case studies to illustrate key concepts and debates, and featuring discussion questions and suggestions for further reading, this is an essential introduction to the subject for students.

An Introduction to Transitional Justice

An Introduction to Transitional Justice

Author: Olivera (Griffith University, Melbourne, Australia) Simic Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/07/2020

The second edition of An Introduction to Transitional Justice provides a comprehensive overview of transitional justice judicial and non-judicial measures implemented by societies to redress legacies of massive human rights abuse. Written by some of the leading experts in the field it takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach to the subject, addressing the dominant transitional justice mechanisms as well as key themes and challenges faced by scholars and practitioners. Using a wide historic and geographic range of case studies to illustrate key concepts and debates, and featuring discussion questions and suggestions for further reading, this is an essential introduction to the subject for students.

The Concept of Genocide in International Criminal Law

The Concept of Genocide in International Criminal Law

Author: Marco Odello Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/07/2020

This book presents a review of historical and emerging legal issues that concern the interpretation of the international crime of genocide. The Polish legal expert Raphael Lemkin formulated the concept of genocide during the Nazi occupation of Europe, and it was then incorporated into the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. This volume looks at the issues that are raised both by the existing international law definition of genocide and by the possible developments that continue to emerge under international criminal law. The authors consider how the concept of genocide might be used in different contexts, and see whether the definition in the 1948 convention may need some revision, also in the light of the original ideas that were expressed by Lemkin. The book focuses on specific themes that allow the reader to understand some of the problems related to the legal definition of genocide, in the context of historical and recent developments. As a valuable contribution to the debate on the significance, meaning and application of the crime of genocide the book will be essential reading for students and academics working in the areas of Legal History, International Criminal Law, Human Rights, and Genocide Studies.

Aggression, the Crime of Crimes

Aggression, the Crime of Crimes

Author: Cristina Villarino Villa Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/07/2020

This book offers a comprehensive study of the content and scope of individual criminal liability for aggression under international law, from the end of World War I to the 2010 Review Conference which, after entry into force, will see aggression come within the ICC's jurisdiction in 2017. It argues that, even under the new substantive provisions of the Rome Statute, the rules governing individual criminal liability for aggression remain imprecise in important respects. It demonstrates that ultimately it will be for the international criminal judge to draw the line between the unlawful and the criminal, thereby acting as much as an adjudicator as a legislator. The book reviews the historical evolution of the criminalization of the use of force from the Treaty of Versailles to the London Conference of 1945, before undertaking a comparative analysis of the jurisprudence on crimes against peace from the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals and allied occupations courts established under Control Council Law No. 10. It shows that the law as applied by post-war tribunals, generally viewed as authority for the customary content of the crime of aggression, was fragmentary and contradictory. It examines relevant legal developments after the establishment of the United Nations with a special focus on the negotiation process that culminated in the adoption of the aggression amendments by the Review Conference in Kampala, critically assessing its definition and content. Finally, the book explores the role of domestic jurisdictions in the prosecution and trial of individuals for the unlawful use of force, setting out the legal and political obstacles that beset the application of the principle of complementarity to this crime.

Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Legacies of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) is one the pioneering experiments in international criminal justice. It has left a rich legal, institutional, and non-judicial legacy. This edited collection provides a broad perspective on the contribution of the tribunal to law, memory, and justice. It explores some of the accomplishments, challenges, and critiques of the ICTY, including its less visible legacies. The book analyses different sites of legacy: the expressive function of the tribunal, its contribution to the framing of facts, events, and narratives of the conflict in the former Yugoslavia, and investigative and experiential legacies. It also explores lesser known aspects of legal practice (such as defence investigative ethics, judgment drafting, contempt cases against journalists, interpretation and translation), outreach, approaches to punishment and sentencing, the tribunals' impact on domestic legal systems, and ongoing debates over impact and societal reception. The volume combines voices from inside the tribunal with external perspectives to elaborate the rich history of the ICTY, which continues to be written to this day.

The Vietnam War and International Law, Volume 3

The Vietnam War and International Law, Volume 3

Author: Richard A. Falk Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/06/2020

Issues of the war that have provoked public controversy and legal debate over the last two years--the Cambodian invasion of May-June 1970, the disclosure in November 1969 of the My Lai massacre, and the question of war crimes--are the focus of Volume 3. As in the previous volumes, the Civil War Panel of the American Society of International Law has endeavored to select the most significant legal writing on the subject and to provide, to the extent possible, a balanced presentation of opposing points of view. Parts I and II deal directly with the Cambodian, My Lai, and war crimes debates. Related questions are treated in the rest of the volume: constitutional debate on the war; the distribution of functions among coordinate branches of the government; the legal status of the insurgent regime in the struggle for control of South Vietnam; prospects for settlement without a clear-cut victory; and Vietnam's role in general world order. The articles reflect the views of some forty contributors: among them, Jean Lacouture, Henry Kissinger, John Norton Moore, Quincy Wright, William H. Rhenquist, and Richard A. Falk. Originally published in 1972. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Principles of Criminal Law

Principles of Criminal Law

Author: Wayne R. LaFave Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/06/2020

Expertly written to provide comprehensive coverage of the most crucial issues in a course, the Concise Hornbook Series features concise analyses by prominent scholars of basic areas of the law. The Series focuses on core principles and concepts fundamental to understanding the subject matter. LaFave's Principles of Criminal Law provides detailed discussion on the topics of responsibility, justification and excuse, inchoate crimes and accomplice liability. The book also gives attention to subjects such as causation, insanity and conspiracy.

The President on Trial

The President on Trial

During the 1980s, thousands of Chadian citizens were detained, tortured, and raped by then-President Hissene Habre's security forces. Decades later, Habre was finally prosecuted for his role in these atrocities not in his own country or in The Hague, but across the African continent, at the Extraordinary African Chambers in Senegal. By some accounts, Habre's trial and conviction by a specially built court in Dakar is the most significant achievement of global criminal justice in the past decade. Simply creating a court and commencing a trial against a deposed head of state was an extraordinary success. With its 2016 judgment, affirmed on appeal in 2017, the hybrid tribunal in Senegal exceeded expectations, working to deadlines and within its budget, with no murdered witnesses or self-dealing officials. This book details and contextualizes the Habre trial. It presents the trial and its impact using a novel structure of first-person accounts from 26 direct actors (Part I), accompanied by academic analysis from leading experts on international criminal justice (Part II). Combined, these views present both local and international perspectives through distinct but inter-locking parts: empirical source material from understudied actors both within and outside the court is then contextualized with expert analysis that reflects on the construction and work of: the Extraordinary African Chamber (EAC) as well as wider themes of international criminal law. Together with an introduction laying out the work and significance of the EAC and its trial of Hissene Habre, the book is a comprehensive consideration of a history-making trial.

International Crimes: Law and Practice

International Crimes: Law and Practice

Judge Mettraux's four-volume compendium, International Crimes: Law and Practice, will provide the most detailed and authoritative account to-date of the law of international crimes. It is a scholarly tour de force providing a unique blend of academic rigour and an insight into the practice of international criminal law. The compendium is un-rivalled in its breadth and depth, covering almost a century of legal practice, dozens of jurisdictions (national and international), thousands of decisions and judgments and hundreds of cases. This second volume discusses in detail crimes against humanity.

Justice as Message

Justice as Message

International criminal justice relies on messages, speech acts, and performative practices in order to convey social meaning. Major criminal proceedings, such as Nuremberg, Tokyo, and other post-World War II trials have been branded as 'spectacles of didactic legality'. However, the expressive and communicative functions of law are often side-lined in institutional discourse and legal practice. This innovative work brings these functions centre-stage, developing the idea of justice as message and outlining the expressivist foundations of international criminal justice in a systematic way. Professor Carsten Stahn examines the origins of the expressivist theory in the sociology of law and the justification of punishment, its articulation in practice, and its broader role as method of international law. He shows that expression and communication is not only an inherent part of the punitive functions of international criminal justice, but is represented in a whole spectrum of practices: norm expression and diffusion, institutional actions, performative aspects of criminal procedures, and repair of harm. He argues that expressivism is not a classical justification of justice or punishment on its own, but rather a means to understand its aspirations and limitations, to explain how justice is produced and to ground punishment rationales. This book is an invitation to think beyond the confines of the legal discipline, and to engage with the multidisciplinary foundations and possibilities of the international criminal justice project.