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Treaties & other sources of international law

See below for a selection of the latest books from Treaties & other sources of international law category. Presented with a red border are the Treaties & other sources of international law books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Treaties & other sources of international law books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Law of Treaties in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States

The Law of Treaties in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States

Author: William E. Butler Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/10/2002

Since the dissolution of the former USSR, twelve countries have, for the first time in modern history, been confronted with the task of defining their attitudes and policies towards the central means for law-making in the international community - the treaty. This 2002 book was the first comparative commentary in any language on the law of treaties as reflected in the legislation of Russia and other member countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States, and in their international practice. Unusually, each has responded by enacting at least one law (sometimes more) on the procedures for treaty relations with other states and international organisations. The book is accompanied by original authoritative translations of all the relevant laws, an extensive classified bibliography and an informed commentary on every article in the laws.

The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety

The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety

Author: Christoph Bail Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2001

Modern biotechnology - the controversial manipulation of genes in living organisms - has far-reaching implications for agriculture, human health, trade and the environment. Against the odds, an international treaty governing biosafety and trade in biotechnology was adopted in 2000. The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety of the Convention on Biological Diversity deals with one of the most important and challenging issues thrown up by developments in biotechnology. This volume is a comprehensive review of the protocol and the process that led to its adoption. It includes contributions from many of the key players involved and analyses the commercial and political interests at stake, the operations and implications of the protocol, and prospects for the future.

International Law in Antiquity

International Law in Antiquity

Author: David J. (Emory University, Atlanta) Bederman Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/03/2001

This study of the origins of international law combines techniques of intellectual history and historiography to investigate the earliest developments of the law of nations. The book examines the sources, processes and doctrines of international legal obligation in antiquity to re-evaluate the critical attributes of international law. David J. Bederman focuses on three essential areas in which law influenced ancient state relations - diplomacy, treaty-making and warfare - in a detailed analysis of international relations in the Near East (2800-700 BCE), the Greek city-states (500-338 BCE) and Rome (358-168 BCE). Containing topical literature and archaeological evidence, this 2001 study does not merely catalogue instances of recognition by ancient states of these seminal features of international law: it accounts for recurrent patterns of thinking and practice. This comprehensive analysis of international law and state relations in ancient times provides a fascinating study for lawyers and academics, ancient historians and classicists alike.

The Oslo Accords

The Oslo Accords

This book presents the first comprehensive legal analysis of the Oslo Accords. Professor Geoffrey Watson begins by rejecting suggestions that the Accords are non-binding political undertakings. He argues instead that they are binding international agreements between subjects of international law. Professor Watson next analyses Israeli and Palestinian compliance with the Accords. Watson concludes that each side has a mixed record of compliance, but that neither side has committed so serious a breach as to warrant termination of the Accords. Finally, Professor Watson offers some suggestions on how international law might help shape a final status agreement between the parties.

Documents on the Laws of War

Documents on the Laws of War

Roberts and Guelff's text has become widely accepted internationally as a standard work on international humanitarian law. The book contains authoritative texts of the main treaties and other key documents covering a wide variety of issues: the rights and duties of both belligerents and neutrals; prohibitions or restrictions on the use of particular weapons; the protection of victims of war, including the wounded and sick, prisoners of war, and civilians; the application of the law to forces operating under UN auspices; the attempts to apply the laws of war in civil wars; the prosecution of war crimes and genocide; the legality of the threat or use of nuclear weapons; and many other matters. This third edition, greatly expanded from the second, contains thirteen new documents, including agreements on anti-personnel mines and laser weapons; key extracts from the statutes of the international criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and the International Criminal Court; two documents on UN forces and international humanitarian law; and an extract from the Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice on nuclear weapons. There is a new appendix listing internet websites. The Introduction sets the subject in its historical context, outlines the various sources of the law, provides basic information about its application to states and individuals, and discusses its relevance in contemporary conflicts. In addition, each of the documents is preceded by a prefatory note by the editors, explaining matters relating to its adoption, interpretation and implementation, including how it relates to other agreements concluded subsequently. Each treaty is followed by a complete list of all states parties, along with the dates of adherence and details of any reservations or declarations which states have made. Prepared with extensive assistance from the official Depositaries of the various agreements, this is an essential reference book for statesmen and diplomats, members of armed forces and humanitarian organizations, lawyers, journalists, and students of international law and international relations.

The International Law Commission of the United Nations

The International Law Commission of the United Nations

Author: Jeffrey S. Morton Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/01/2000

An appraisal of the International Law Commission of the United Nations. It sheds light on its functions and the process by which it pursues its stated goals of codifying and developing international law. It also addresses the dearth of systematic analysis of the Commission's work.

The Human Rights Act and the Criminal Justice and Regulatory Process

The Human Rights Act and the Criminal Justice and Regulatory Process

Author: University of Cambridge. Centre for Public Law Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/1999

The UK's new Human Rights Act with its duty to give domestic effect to the European Convention on Human Rights and the jurisprudence of the Strasbourg court will have a significant effect on many aspects of the criminal and regulatory process. The papers in this volume,arising from the second Cambridge Centre for Public Law conference consider the Act's impact on investigation and surveillance, on evidence, procedure and the substantive law applied at trials and hearings, and at the post-trial stage e.g. sentencing and post-report action in respect of DTI Inspection. Contributions from many of the country's leading criminal and regulatory lawyers (both academic and practising) make this volume an important and original source for all criminal lawyers.

The International Law Commission 1949-1998: Volume One: The Treaties

The International Law Commission 1949-1998: Volume One: The Treaties

The International Law Commission is the UN body principally responsible for the codification and development of international law. It first met in 1949 and held its fiftieth session in 1998.

Judging War Criminals

Judging War Criminals

Author: Y. Beigbeder Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/12/1998

In June 1998, diplomats met in Rome to draft the Statute of an International Criminal Court. Based on the precedents of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals and of the War Crimes Tribunals for Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the new Court will judge individuals, not States. Unpunished mass slaughters have occurred in many countries. National justice is often ineffective. Truth and reconciliation commissions complement but do not replace justice. International 'Peoples' Tribunals have no international legitimacy. It is hoped that a permanent, international criminal court may combat impunity and deter more crimes.

Conversion of Former BTW Facilities

Conversion of Former BTW Facilities

Author: Erhard Geissler, Lajos G. Gazso, Ernst Buder Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/1998

The development, production, stockpiling and use in war of biological and toxin weapons are prohibited by international law. Although not explicitly stated, the two treaties outlawing such activities, the Geneva Protocol of 1925 and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention of 1972, prohibit the continuation of activities previously performed in Biological and Toxin Weapons facilities not justified for prophylactic, protective or other peaceful purposes. Because conversion and other means of cessation of former BTW facilities are not explicitly addressed in the treaties mentioned above the problems involved in conversion ofBTW facilities have thus far only been discussed marginally in the open literature. In times of increased awareness of the danger of biological and toxin warfare (including the increased danger of terrorist use of biological and toxin weapons) it seemed necessary to us to invite experts from different parts of the world to discuss the pros and cons of conversion and the problems involved. It also became obvious to us that the conversion of former BTW facilities should be discussed with respect to the necessity of peaceful internatioual cooperation in areas related to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention. An additional reason to discuss matters of peaceful cooperation is that cooperation is explictly requested by Article X of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention.

Conversion of Former BTW Facilities

Conversion of Former BTW Facilities

Author: Erhard Geissler, Lajos G. Gazso, Ernst Buder Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/1998

The development, production, stockpiling and use in war of biological and toxin weapons are prohibited by international law. Although not explicitly stated, the two treaties outlawing such activities, the Geneva Protocol of 1925 and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention of 1972, prohibit the continuation of activities previously performed in Biological and Toxin Weapons facilities not justified for prophylactic, protective or other peaceful purposes. Because conversion and other means of cessation of former BTW facilities are not explicitly addressed in the treaties mentioned above the problems involved in conversion ofBTW facilities have thus far only been discussed marginally in the open literature. In times of increased awareness of the danger of biological and toxin warfare (including the increased danger of terrorist use of biological and toxin weapons) it seemed necessary to us to invite experts from different parts of the world to discuss the pros and cons of conversion and the problems involved. It also became obvious to us that the conversion of former BTW facilities should be discussed with respect to the necessity of peaceful internatioual cooperation in areas related to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention. An additional reason to discuss matters of peaceful cooperation is that cooperation is explictly requested by Article X of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention.

Naval Weapons Systems and the Contemporary Law of War

Naval Weapons Systems and the Contemporary Law of War

This book provides the first comprehensive critical analysis of the regulation of naval weapons during armed conflict. It examines the experience this century with the use of naval mines, submarines and anti-ship missiles, the three main naval weapons. The sources of international law relevant to an assessment of the law, that is the extant conventions, state practice, military manuals, war crimes prosecutions, and the opinions of publicists, are each extensively examined so that a clear picture of the law emerges. The book examines the impact of agreements drawn up in peacetime on wartime conduct and focuses on the growth of law through customary practice. While stating the law as it is today, it also provides suggestions for the practical development of the law.