LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Public international law

See below for a selection of the latest books from Public international law category. Presented with a red border are the Public international law books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Public international law books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Crime of Aggression under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

The Crime of Aggression under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

Author: Carrie (University of Melbourne) McDougall Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

After the crime of aggression was adopted under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Carrie McDougall used her intimate involvement in the crime's negotiations, combined with extensive scholarly reflection to produce the first and most comprehensive academic study. This updated second edition offers an exhaustive and sophisticated legal analysis of the crime's definition, as well as the provisions governing the ICC's exercise of jurisdiction over the crime. It explores the desirability of holding individuals to account for unlawful uses of inter-State armed force, the geo-political significance of the crime and a range of practical issues likely to arise in prosecutions before both the ICC and domestic courts. This book is highly relevant to all academics and practitioners interested in the crime of aggression, as well as broader issues relating to the prohibition of the use of force, international criminal law and the ICC.

The Crime of Aggression under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

The Crime of Aggression under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

Author: Carrie (University of Melbourne) McDougall Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/04/2021

After the crime of aggression was adopted under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, Carrie McDougall used her intimate involvement in the crime's negotiations, combined with extensive scholarly reflection to produce the first and most comprehensive academic study. This updated second edition offers an exhaustive and sophisticated legal analysis of the crime's definition, as well as the provisions governing the ICC's exercise of jurisdiction over the crime. It explores the desirability of holding individuals to account for unlawful uses of inter-State armed force, the geo-political significance of the crime and a range of practical issues likely to arise in prosecutions before both the ICC and domestic courts. This book is highly relevant to all academics and practitioners interested in the crime of aggression, as well as broader issues relating to the prohibition of the use of force, international criminal law and the ICC.

War Economies and International Law

War Economies and International Law

Author: Mark B. Taylor Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

Economic activity continues during war. But what rules apply when US troops occupy Syrian oil fields? Who is responsible when multinational companies use minerals extracted by child labourers in war zones? This book examines how international law regulates the war economies that are at the heart of strategic competition between great powers and help sustain the irregular warfare in today's war zones. Drawing on advances in our understanding of the social and economic dynamics in war zones, this book identifies predation, a combination of violence and economic opportunity, as the core pathology of war economies. The author presents a framework for understanding the regulation of war economies based on the history of international law and existing norms of international humanitarian law, international criminal law, international human rights law and the law of international peace and security. War Economies and International Law concludes that the pathologies of predation in war demand answers based on an international regulatory strategy.

Contingency in International Law

Contingency in International Law

This book poses a question that is deceptive in its simplicity: could international law have been otherwise? Today, there is hardly a serious account left that would consider the path of international law to be necessary, and that would refute the possibility of a different law altogether. But behind every possibility of the past stands a reason why the law developed as it did. Only with a keen sense of why things turned out the way they did is it possible to argue about how the law could plausibly have turned out differently. The search for contingency in international law is often motivated, as it is in this volume, by a refusal to resign to the present state of affairs. By recovering past possibilities, this volume aims to inform projects of transformative legal change for the future. The book situates that search for contingency theoretically and carries it into practice across many fields, with chapters discussing human rights and armed conflict, migrants and refugees, the sea and natural resources, foreign investments and trade. In doing so, it shows how politically charged questions about contingency have always been.

Less-Lethal Weapons under International Law

Less-Lethal Weapons under International Law

Author: Elisabeth (Johannes Kepler Universitat Linz) Hoffberger-Pippan Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/03/2021

Hitherto 'less-lethal' weapons, in contrast to classical firearms and other highly destructive weapons, have literally slipped under the radar of public international law. This book is the first monograph addressing and analysing all international legal regimes applicable to less-lethal weapons, ranging from arms control treaties, international humanitarian, criminal and human rights law. In doing so the different scenarios in which less-lethal weapons come to use will be taken into account, such as law enforcement, armed conflict and law enforcement scenarios during armed conflict. The relationships between the different legal regimes will be elaborated thoroughly with a view to examining how international law responds to less-lethal weapons. The final chapter provides guidelines as well as recommendations on appropriate use and regulation of less-lethal weapons, where the different scenarios of application, such as in armed conflict and law enforcement, will be given due account.

The International Court of Justice and Decolonisation

The International Court of Justice and Decolonisation

Author: Thomas (Universitat St Gallen, Switzerland) Burri Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/03/2021

The 2019 Chagos Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice is a decision of profound legal and political significance. Presented with a rare opportunity to pronounce on the right to self-determination and the rules governing decolonization, the ICJ responded with remarkable directness. The contributions to this book examine the Court's reasoning, the importance of the decision for the international system, and its consequences for the situation in the Chagos Archipelago in particular. Apart from bringing the Chagossians closer to the prospect of returning to the islands from which they were covertly expelled half a century ago, the decision and its political context may be understood as part of a broader shift in North/South relations, in which formerly dominant powers like the UK must come to terms with their waning influence on the world stage, and in which voices from former colonies are increasingly shaping the institutional and normative landscape.

The Asian Turn in Foreign Investment

The Asian Turn in Foreign Investment

Author: Mahdev (Singapore Management University) Mohan Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/03/2021

This collection critically discusses the increasing significance of Asian States in the field of international investment law and policy. Consisting of contributions authored by a leading team of scholars and practitioners of international investment law, this volume contains analyses of both national and multilateral investment law rule-making in Asia, including a critical discussion of certain States' approaches to balancing the different tension between investment protection and the preservation of States' regulatory sovereignty. It also contains thematic chapters on cutting-edge developments which are of relevance to Asia as well as the global community, such as investors' obligations of due diligence, additional transparency in treaty-based investment arbitration responses by ASEAN member States to transboundary haze pollution, and the relevance of human rights obligations in international investment law. It also contemplates future possibilities for investor-State dispute settlement, including the use of investor-State mediation in view of the Singapore Convention on Mediation.

General Principles as a Source of International Law

General Principles as a Source of International Law

Author: Dr Imogen (Australian National University, Canberra) Saunders Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/03/2021

This book provides a comprehensive analysis of an often neglected, misunderstood and maligned source of international law. Article 38(1)(c) of the Statute of the International Court of Justice sets out that the Court will apply the 'general principles of law recognized by civilized nations'. This source is variously lauded and criticised: held up as a panacea to all international law woes or denied even normative validity. The contrasting views and treatments of General Principles stem from a lack of a model of the source itself. This book provides that model, offering a new and rigorous understanding of Article 38(1)(c) that will be of immense value to scholars and practitioners of international law alike. At the heart of the book is a new tetrahedral framework of analysis - looking to function, type, methodology and jurisprudential legitimacy. Adopting an historical approach, the book traces the development of the source from 1875 to 2019, encompassing jurisprudence of the Permanent Court of International Justice and the International Court of Justice as well as cases from international criminal tribunals, the International Criminal Court and the World Trade Organisation. The book argues for precision in identifying cases that actually apply General Principles, and builds upon these 'proper use' cases to advance a comprehensive model of General Principles, advocating for a global approach to the methodology of the source.

The Concept of an International Organization in International Law

The Concept of an International Organization in International Law

Author: Lorenzo (Bocconi University) Gasbarri Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/03/2021

Despite their exponential growth in number and activities, there is not an established legal concept of an international organization. This book tackles the topic by examining the nature of the legal systems developed by international organizations. It is the first comprehensive study of the concepts by which international organizations' legal systems are commonly understood: functionalism, constitutionalism, exceptionalism, and informalism. Its purpose is threefold: to trace the historical origins of the different concepts of an international organization, to describe four groups under which these different notions can be aligned, and to propose a theory which defines international organizations as 'dual entities'. The concept of an international organization is defined by looking at the nature of the legal systems they develop. The notion of 'dual legal nature' describes how organizations create particular legal systems that derive from international law. This situation affects the law they produce, which is international and internal at the same time. The effects of the dual legal nature are considered by analysing international responsibility, the law of treaties, and the validity of organizations' acts.

Standing Up for Justice

Standing Up for Justice

This is a book about international criminal justice written by one of its foremost practitioners and academic thinkers, Judge Theodor Meron. For two decades, Judge Meron has been at the heart of the international criminal justice system, serving as President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), President of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals, and a Judge of the Appeals Chambers of the ICTY and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Drawing on this experience, and his life and career before serving as an international judge, Judge Meron reflects on some of the key questions facing the international criminal justice system. In the opening chapter, Judge Meron writes vividly about his childhood experiences in Poland during World War II, his education, career with the Israeli Foreign Ministry, and subsequent move into academia in the United States. The book continues with Meron's reflections on what it means to transform from a law professor into an international criminal judge, and shifts focus to the criminal courtroom, addressing topics such as the judicial function, the rule of law, and the principle of fairness in trying atrocity crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Judge Meron discusses judicial independence and impartiality in international criminal courts, shedding light on the mystery of judicial decision-making and deliberations. Notably, he addresses the controversial subjects of acquittals and the early release of prisoners. Although acquittals are often seen as a failure of international justice, Judge Meron argues that legal principle must come before any extraneous purpose, however desirable that purpose may be. Finally, the book looks ahead at the challenges facing the future of international justice and accountability, and discusses the all-important question: does international criminal justice work?