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Publishing industry & book trade

See below for a selection of the latest books from Publishing industry & book trade category. Presented with a red border are the Publishing industry & book trade books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Publishing industry & book trade books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Victorian Popular Fiction

Victorian Popular Fiction

Author: John Spiers Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/2020

All the Beauty at Hand

All the Beauty at Hand

Author: Thomas Zuhr Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/11/2020

This attractively designed publication documents the work of Hirmer Verlag during the past 65 years. Since 1948 a total of over 1,100 titles have appeared under this brand name. True to the motto Art books that set standards, the publishers have always worked in the service of art, upholding their determination to maintain the very highest quality. A book about those who make books and those who sell them, about book art and art books, about partnership with museums and loyalty to authors.

The Hub City Writers Project

The Hub City Writers Project

Author: Betsy Wakefield Teter Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/11/2020

This full color book details fifty iconic stories in the twenty-five year history of the Hub City Writers Project, founded in 1995 in Spartanburg, South Carolina. Each includes a double page illustrated spread. The book features short essays by local and regional writers about moments like the Lawson's Fork Festival in 2000, the Out Loud campaign against academic censorship, all the way to the introduction of our signature event, Delicious Reads. This book celebrates the first twenty-five years and details how the Hub City Writers Project grew from an idea hatched in a downtown coffee shop among three local writers to now being one of the South's most robust literary organizations.

Conde Nast

Conde Nast

Author: Susan Ronald Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/11/2020

The first biography in over thirty years of Conde Nast, the pioneering publisher of Vogue and Vanity Fair and main rival to media magnate William Randolph Hearst. Conde Nast's life and career was as high profile and glamourous as his magazines. Moving to New York in the early twentieth century with just the shirt on his back, he soon became the highest paid executive in the United States, acquiring Vogue in 1909 and Vanity Fair in 1913. Alongside his editors, Edna Woolman Chase at Vogue and Frank Crowninshield at Vanity Fair, he built the first-ever international magazine empire, introducing European modern art, style, and fashions to an American audience. Credited with creating the cafe society, Nast became a permanent fixture on the international fashion scene and a major figure in New York society. His superbly appointed apartment at 1040 Park Avenue, decorated by the legendary Elsie de Wolfe, became a gathering place for the major artistic figures of the time. Nast launched the careers of icons like Cecil Beaton, Clare Boothe Luce, Lee Miller, Dorothy Parker and Noel Coward. He left behind a legacy that endures today in media powerhouses such as Anna Wintour, Tina Brown, and Graydon Carter. Written with the cooperation of his family on both sides of the Atlantic and a dedicated team at Conde Nast Publications, critically acclaimed biographer Susan Ronald reveals the life of an extraordinary American success story.

The Curious Person's Guide to Fighting Fake News

The Curious Person's Guide to Fighting Fake News

Author: David G. McAfee Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/10/2020

Combating Threats to Media Freedom and Journalist Safety

Combating Threats to Media Freedom and Journalist Safety

Author: Sadia Jamil Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/10/2020

The freedom of expression and the freedom of information are the indispensable components of free media. Without these two basic rights, an informed, active, and participatory citizenry is impossible. Members of the media require special protections to enable them to operate freely in order to advocate for human rights, public discourse, and the plurality of ideas. Combating Threats to Media Freedom and Journalist Safety is an essential reference source that evaluates how diverse threats impact on journalists' wellbeing, their right to freedom of expression, and overall media freedoms in various contexts and assesses inadequacies in national security policies, planning, and coordination relating to the safety of journalists in different countries. Featuring research on topics such as freedom of the press, professional journalism, and media security, this book is ideally designed for journalists, news writers, editors, columnists, press, broadcasters, newscasters, government officials, lawmakers, diplomats, international relations officers, law enforcement, industry professionals, academicians, researchers, and students.

James Laughlin, New Directions Press, and the Remaking of Ezra Pound

James Laughlin, New Directions Press, and the Remaking of Ezra Pound

Author: Gregory Barnhisel Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/10/2020

Although James Laughlin (1914-1997) came from one of Pittsburgh's leading steel-making families, his passions were literary rather than industrial - he wanted to be a poet. Laughlin was a freshman at Harvard when he traveled to Rapallo, Italy, in 1933 to meet Ezra Pound (1885-1972), and he returned the following year to enroll in the poet's Ezuversity. Pound dismissed Laughlin's poetic talents, advising the wealthy young man to make himself a publisher. Laughlin did just that, founding New Directions Press in 1936. For much of the 1930s, Laughlin and Pound were friends, business associates, collaborators, student and teacher, and even at times son and surrogate father. But Laughlin's investment in Pound - and their friendship - was severely tested by Pound's wartime propaganda broadcasts for Italian state radio, his capture and abortive trial for treason, and his thirteen-year stay as a mental patient in St. Elizabeths Hospital. Following this scandal and disgrace, the reading public no longer wanted to buy Pound's books, and the critical establishment dismissed him as a Fascist crank. Laughlin and New Directions responded by marketing Pound in such a way as to convince consumers that the poet's importance needed to be judged solely on aesthetic grounds, and that his political beliefs were irrelevant to his accomplishments as a pioneering literary artist. With Pound's encouragement, and despite the poet's oft-expressed opposition to the mixture of commerce and art, Laughlin used such marketing tools as advertising, the cultivation of friendly critics, and the development of the trade paperback to enhance Pound's reputation. Drawing on a wide range of sources - including interviews with Laughlin and other New Directions staffers and unpublished materials from numerous literary archives - Gregory Barnhisel tells the story of the personal and professional relationship between one of the twentieth century's most controversial writers and his loyal and innovative American publisher - a relationship that eventually helped remake literary history and continues to shape our understanding of modernism itself.

A History of the Book in America (5 Volume Set)

A History of the Book in America (5 Volume Set)

Author: David D. Hall Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/10/2020

The five volumes in A History of the Book in America offer a sweeping chronicle of our country's print production and culture from colonial times to the end of the twentieth century. This interdisciplinary, collaborative work of scholarship examines the book trades as they have developed and spread throughout the United States; provides a history of U.S. literary cultures; investigates the practice of reading and, more broadly, the uses of literacy; and links literary culture with larger themes in American history.

Casanova Was A Book Lover

Casanova Was A Book Lover

Author: John Maxwell Hamilton Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/10/2020

Everyone knows which books people buy; they can just look at the best-seller lists. But who knows which books people steal? Who, for that matter, knows that authors ruin the book market by writing too much? Or why book critics are not critical? Or why librarians need to throw out more books? Who, indeed, knows the answer to that all-important question in our democracy: should presidents and presidential candidates write books? (The answer is no.) In this irreverent analysis of the book industry, John Maxwell Hamilton -- a longtime journalist and public radio commentator -- answers these questions and many more, proving that the best way to study books is not to take them too seriously. He provides a rich history of the book -- from the days when monks laboriously hand-copied texts to the tidal wave of Titanic tie-ins -- and gives a succinct overview of the state of the industry today, including writing, marketing, promoting, reviewing, ghostwriting, and collecting. Throughout, Hamilton peppers his prose with spicy tidbits of information that will fascinate bibliophiles everywhere. For instance, did you know that Walt Whitman was fired from a government job because his boss found Leaves of Grass, and its author, immoral? Or that the most stolen book in the United States is the Bible, followed by The Joy of Sex? How about that Dan Quayle's 1989 Christmas card read, May our nation continue to be a beakon of hope to the world ? Or that Casanova was an ardent lover of books as well as women? Hamilton offers an inside look at the history and business of book reviewing, explaining why, more often than not, reviewers resemble counselors at a self-esteem camp and examining the enormous impact of the Oprah effect on the market. As the self-appointed Emily Post of the book world, he advises publishers, authors, and readers on proper etiquette for everything from book parties ( Feel free to build a party around a theme in a book, no matter how tacky ) and jacket photos ( You should not show off your new baby unless [your] book [is] about raising kids ), to book signings ( Just because an author has given you an autograph does not mean they want to become your pen pal ) and promotion by friends and relatives ( They should carry the book at all times on public transportation with the cover showing ). Both edifying and enjoyable, Casanova Was a Book Lover fills a Grand Canyon--sized void in the literature on literature. It is indispensable for book enthusiasts who want to know the naked truth about reading, writing, and publishing.

Press Achieved

Press Achieved

Author: Dennis McEldowney Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/10/2020

Written by a former Managing Editor who is also a well-known writer, this text charts the origins of Auckland University Press up to its formal recognition in 1972. It is in two parts: the first, up to 1966, based on documents, and the second written in the first person and relying partly on memory. The epilogue is a lightning sketch of the period 1972-86; and the introduction with equal speed covers changes since then. A list of publications covers the entire output of the press to the present day and includes detail not usually included in bibliographies. Dennis McEldowney offers here a document in the history of the book in New Zealand; and a view of university politics and administration, glimpses of New Zealand culture in the making.

Mass Authorship and the Rise of Self-Publishing

Mass Authorship and the Rise of Self-Publishing

Author: Timothy Laquintano Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/10/2020

In the last two decades, digital technologies have made it possible for anyone with a computer and an Internet connection to rapidly and inexpensively self-publish a book. Once a stigmatized niche activity, self-publishing has grown explosively. Hobbyists and professionals alike have produced millions of books, circulating them through e-readers and the web. What does this new flood of books mean for publishing, authors, and readers? Some lament the rise of self-publishing because it tramples the gates and gatekeepers who once reserved publication for those who met professional standards. Others tout authors' new freedom from the narrow-minded exclusivity of traditional publishing. Critics mourn the death of the author; fans celebrate the democratization of authorship. Drawing on eight years of research and interviews with more than eighty self-published writers, Mass Authorship avoids the polemics, instead showing how writers are actually thinking about and dealing with this brave new world. Timothy Laquintano compares the experiences of self-publishing authors in three distinct genres-poker strategy guides, memoirs, and romance novels- as well as those of writers whose self-published works hit major bestseller lists. He finds that the significance of self-publishing and the challenge it presents to traditional publishing depend on the aims of authors, the desires of their readers, the affordances of their platforms, and the business plans of the companies that provide those platforms. In drawing a nuanced portrait of self-publishing authors today, Laquintano answers some of the most pressing questions about what it means to publish in the twenty-first century: How do writers establish credibility in an environment with no editors to judge quality? How do authors police their copyrights online without recourse to the law? How do they experience Amazon as a publishing platform? And how do they find an audience when, it sometimes seems, there are more writers than readers?

Metamedia

Metamedia

Author: Alexander Starre Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2020

Does literature need the book? With electronic texts and reading devices growing increasingly popular, the codex is no longer the default format of fiction. Yet as Alexander Starre shows in Metamedia, American literature has rediscovered the book as anartistic medium after the first ebook hype in the late 1990s. By fusing narrative and design, a number of bibliographic writers have created reflexive fictions-metamedia-that invite us to read printed formats in new ways. Their work challenges ingrainedtheories and beliefs about literary communication and its connections to technology and materiality. Metamedia explores the book as a medium that matters and introduces innovative critical concepts to better grasp its narrative significance. Combining sustained textual analysis with impulses from the fields of book history, media studies, and systems theory, Starre explains the aesthetics and the cultural work of complex material fictions, such as Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves (2000), Chip Kidd's The Cheese Monkeys (2001), Salvador Plascencia's The People of Paper (2005), Reif Larsen's The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet (2009), and Jonathan Safran Foer's Tree of Codes (2010). He also broadens his analysis beyond the genre of the novel in an extensive account of the influential literary magazine McSweeney's Quarterly Concern and its founder, Dave Eggers. For this millennial generation of writers and publishers, the computer was never a threat to print culture, but a powerful tool to make better books. In careful close readings, Starre puts typefaces, layouts, and cover designs on the map of literary criticism. At the same time, the book steers clear of bibliophile nostalgia and technological euphoria as it follows writers, designers, and publishers in the process of shaping the surprising history of literary bookmaking after digitization.