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Battles & campaigns

See below for a selection of the latest books from Battles & campaigns category. Presented with a red border are the Battles & campaigns books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Battles & campaigns books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Naval Siege of Japan 1945 War Plan Orange Triumphant

The Naval Siege of Japan 1945 War Plan Orange Triumphant

Author: Brian Lane Herder Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/04/2020

The final months of Allied naval bombardments on the Home Islands during World War II have, for whatever reason, frequently been overlooked by historians. Yet the Allies' final naval campaign against Japan involved the largest and arguably most successful wartime naval fleet ever assembled, and was the climax to the greatest naval war in history. Though suffering grievous losses during its early attacks, by July 1945 the United States Third Fleet wielded 1,400 aircraft just off the coast of Japan, while Task Force 37, the British Pacific Fleet's carrier and battleship striking force, was the most powerful single formation ever assembled by the Royal Navy. In the final months of the war the Third Fleet's 20 American and British aircraft carriers would hurl over 10,000 aerial sorties against the Home Islands, whilst another ten Allied battleships would inflict numerous morale-destroying shellings on Japanese coastal cities. In this illustrated study, historian Brian Lane Herder draws on primary sources and expert analysis to chronicle the full story of the Allies' Navy Siege of Japan from February 1945 to the very last days of World War II.

Lawrence of Arabia on War The Campaign in the Desert 1916-18

Lawrence of Arabia on War The Campaign in the Desert 1916-18

Author: Robert Johnson Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2020

One hundred years ago, Captain Lawrence and an unlikely band of Arab irregulars captured the strategic port of Aqaba after an epic journey through waterless tracts of desert. Their attacks on railways during the Great War are well known and have become the stuff of legend, but while Lawrence himself has been the subject of fascinating biographies, as well as an award-winning film, the context of his war in the desert, and his ideas on war itself, are less well-known. This new title offers a high-paced evaluation of T. E. Lawrence 'of Arabia' and the British military operations in the Near East, revising and adding to conventional narratives in order to tell the full story of this influential figure, as well as the Ottoman-Turkish perspective, and the Arabs' position, within the context of the war. It is also a study of warfare and the manner in which Lawrence and others made their assessments of what was changing, what was distinctive, and what was unique to the desert environment. This book sets Lawrence in context, examines the peace settlement he participated in, and describes how Lawrence's legacy has informed and inspired those partnering and mentoring local forces to the present day.

Stay and Fight it out The Second Day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, Culp's Hill and the North End of the Battlefield

Stay and Fight it out The Second Day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, Culp's Hill and the North End of the Battlefield

Author: Chris Mackowski, Kristopher White, Daniel Davis Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/03/2020

July 1, 1863, had gone poorly for the Union army's XI Corps. Shattered in battle north of the Pennsylvania town of Gettysburg, the battered and embarrassed unit ended the day hunkered at the crest of a cemetery-topped hill south of the village. Reinforcements fortified the position, which extended eastward to include another key piece of high ground, Culp's Hill. The Federal line also extended southward down Cemetery Ridge, forming what eventually became a long fishhook. July 2 saw a massive Confederate attack against the southernmost part of the line. As the Southern juggernaut rolled inexorably northward, Federal troops shifted away from Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill to meet the threat. Just then, the Army of Northern Virginia's vaunted Second Corps launched itself at the weakened Federal right. The very men who, just the day before, broke the Union army resolved to break it once again. The ensuing struggle-every bit as desperate and with stakes every bit as high as the more-famous fight at Little Round Top on the far end of the line-left the entire Union position in the balance. Stay and fight it out, one Union general counseled. The Confederates were all too willing to oblige. Authors Chris Mackowski, Kristopher D. White, and Daniel T. Davis started their Gettysburg account in Don't Give an Inch: The Second Day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863-from Little Round Top to Cemetery Ridge. Picking up on the heels of its companion volume, Stay and Fight It Out: The Second Day at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863-Culp's Hill and the Northern End of the Battlefield they recount the often-overlooked fight that secured the Union position and set the stage for the battle's fateful final day.

Midway

Midway

Author: Richard Worth Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Marathon, Hastings, Midway -- just a few of the major battles covered in this series, which introduces readers to the wartime engagements that changed the course of human history. Each book gives a historical account of a decisive battle -- its participants, the political climate leading to the engagement, and the deciding factors that ultimately led to a victory or defeat. This World War II naval battle, fought entirely by aircraft, ushered in a new era in military history.

The Eye of Command

The Eye of Command

Author: Kimberly Kagan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/02/2020

Published in 1976, Sir John Keegan's The Face of Battle was a ground-breaking work in military history studies, providing narrative techniques that served as a model for countless subsequent scholarly and popular military histories. Keegan's approach to understanding battles stressed the importance of small unit actions and personal heroism, an approach exemplified in the narratives produced by reporters embedded with American combat troops in Iraq. Challenging Keegan's seminal work, Kimberly Kagan's The Eye of Command offers a new approach to studying and narrating battles, based upon an analysis of the works of the Roman military authors Julius Caesar and Ammianus Marcellinus. Kagan argues that historians cannot explain a battle's outcome solely on the basis of soldiers' accounts of small-unit actions. A commander's view, however, helps explain the significance of a battle's major events, how they relate to one another, and how they lead to a battle's outcome. The eye of command approach also answers fundamental questions about the way commanders perceive battles as they fight them - questions modern military historians have largely ignored.

Death of the Wehrmacht The German Campaigns of 1942

Death of the Wehrmacht The German Campaigns of 1942

Author: Robert M. Citino Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/02/2020

For Hitler and the German military, 1942 was a key turning point of World War II, as an overstretched but still lethal Wehrmacht replaced brilliant victories and huge territorial gains with stalemates and strategic retreats. In this major reevaluation of that crucial year, Robert Citino shows that the German army's emerging woes were rooted as much in its addiction to the war of movement --attempts to smash the enemy in short and lively campaigns--as they were in Hitler's deeply flawed management of the war. From the overwhelming operational victories at Kerch and Kharkov in May to the catastrophic defeats at El Alamein and Stalingrad, Death of the Wehrmacht offers an eye-opening new view of that decisive year. Building upon his widely respected critique in The German Way of War, Citino shows how the campaigns of 1942 fit within the centuries-old patterns of Prussian/German warmaking and ultimately doomed Hitler's expansionist ambitions. He examines every major campaign and battle in the Russian and North African theaters throughout the year to assess how a military geared to quick and decisive victories coped when the tide turned against it. Citino also reconstructs the German generals' view of the war and illuminates the multiple contingencies that might have produced more favorable results. In addition, he cites the fatal extreme aggressiveness of German commanders like Erwin Rommel and assesses how the German system of command and its commitment to the independence of subordinate commanders suffered under the thumb of Hitler and chief of staff General Franz Halder. More than the turning point of a war, 1942 marked the death of a very old and traditional pattern of warmaking, with the classic German way of war unable to meet the challenges of the twentieth century. Blending masterly research with a gripping narrative, Citino's remarkable work provides a fresh and revealing look at how one of history's most powerful armies began to founder in its quest for world domination. This book is part of the Modern War Studies series.

One Flag, One Queen, One Tongue New Zealand and the South African War

One Flag, One Queen, One Tongue New Zealand and the South African War

Author: Ian McGibbon Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 13/02/2020

War has been an unforgettable, powerful experience for many New Zealanders, and a defining element in the evolution of New Zealand as a nation. The South African War - the Boer War of 1899-1902 - was New Zealand's first overseas war, in which more than 6,000 people fought and 230 lost their lives. This collection of essays by leading historians presents various perspectives on New Zealand's involvement in this historical event. Opposition to the war, women and Maori in the war, the Australian perspective, and the Montreal Flag Riot of 1900 are all subjtects covered. Several distinguished overseas historians, inluding Tom Pakenham and Carman Miller, set the New Zealand effort in a wider imperial framework.

The Third Crusade Richard the Lionhearted Versus Saladin

The Third Crusade Richard the Lionhearted Versus Saladin

Author: Samuel Willard Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/02/2020

Recounts the battle known as the Third Crusade between Richard the Lionhearted of England and the Muslim leader Saladin and the fight over the Holy Land in 1191 A.D.

Colder than Hell A Marine Rifle Company at Chosin Reservoir

Colder than Hell A Marine Rifle Company at Chosin Reservoir

Author: Joseph R. Owen Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/02/2020

During the early, uncertain days of the Korean War, World War II veteran and company lieutenant Joe Owen saw firsthand how the hastily assembled mix of some two hundred regulars and raw reservists hardened into a superb Marine rifle company known as Baker-One-Seven. As comrades fell wounded and dead around them on the frozen slopes above Korea's infamous Chosin Reservoir, Baker-One-Seven's Marines triumphed against the relentless human-wave assaults of Chinese regulars and took part in the breakout that destroyed six to eight divisions of Chinese regulars. Colder Than Hell paints a vivid, frightening portrait of one of the most horrific infantry battles ever waged.

The Battles of Armageddon Megiddo and the Jezreel Valley from the Bronze Age to the Nuclear Age

The Battles of Armageddon Megiddo and the Jezreel Valley from the Bronze Age to the Nuclear Age

Author: Eric H. Cline Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/02/2020

Apocalypse. Judgment Day. The End Time. Armageddon. Students of the Bible know it as the place where the cataclysmic battle between the forces of good and the forces of evil will unfold. Many believe that this battle will take place in the very near future. But few know that Armageddon is a real place--one that has seen more fighting and bloodshed than any other spot on earth. The name Armageddon is a corruption of the Hebrew phrase Har Megiddo, and it means Mount of Megiddo. More than thirty bloody conflicts have been fought at the ancient site of Megiddo and adjacent areas of the Jezreel Valley during the past four thousand years. Egyptians, Israelites, Greeks, Muslims, Crusaders, Mongols, British, Germans, Arabs, and Israelis have all fought and died here. The names of the warring leaders reverberate throughout history: Thutmose III, Deborah, Gideon, Saul and Jonathan, Jezebel, Saladin, Napoleon, and Allenby, to name but the most famous. Throughout history Megiddo and the Jezreel Valley have been ground zero for battles that determined the very course of civilization. No wonder that the author of Revelation believed Armageddon, the penultimate battle between good and evil, would also take place here! The Battles of Armageddon introduces readers to a rich cast of ancient and modern warriors, while bringing together for the first time the wide range of conflicts that have been fought at Megiddo and the Jezreel Valley from the Bronze Age to the Nuclear Age.

World War I in Central and Eastern Europe Politics, Conflict and Military Experience

World War I in Central and Eastern Europe Politics, Conflict and Military Experience

Author: Judith (University College Dublin, Republic of Ireland) Devlin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/01/2020

In the English language World War I has largely been analysed and understood through the lens of the Western Front. This book addresses this imbalance by examining the war in Eastern and Central Europe. The historiography of the war in the West has increasingly focused on the experience of ordinary soldiers and civilians, the relationships between them and the impact of war at the time and subsequently. This book takes up these themes and, engaging with the approaches and conclusions of historians of the Western front, examines wartime experiences and the memory of war in the East. Analysing soldiers' letters and diaries to discover the nature and impact of displacement and refugee status on memory, this volume offers a basis for comparison between experiences in these two areas. It also provides material for intra-regional comparisons that are still missing from the current research. Was the war in the East wholly 'other'? Were soldiers in this region as alienated as those in the West? Did they see themselves as citizens and was there continuity between their pre-war or civilian and military identities? And if, in the Eastern context, these identities were fundamentally challenged, was it the experience of war itself or its consequences (in the shape of imprisonment and displacement, and changing borders) that mattered most? How did soldiers and citizens in this region experience and react to the traumas and upheavals of war and with what consequences for the post-war era? In seeking to answer these questions and others, this volume significantly adds to our understanding of World War I as experienced in Central and Eastern Europe.