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Comparative politics

See below for a selection of the latest books from Comparative politics category. Presented with a red border are the Comparative politics books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Comparative politics books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

European Labour Movements in Crisis From Indecision to Indifference

European Labour Movements in Crisis From Indecision to Indifference

Author: Thomas Prosser Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/04/2020

Prosser argues that labour movements respond to European integration in a manner which instigates competition between national labour markets. In an engaging style which will be accessible to scholars, students and policymakers, the book bases its hypothesis on analysis of four countries, Germany, Spain, France and Poland and two processes: the collective bargaining practices of trade unions in the first decade of the Eurozone and the response of trade unions and social-democratic parties to austerity in Southern Europe. In the first process, although unions did not intentionally compete, there was a drift towards zero-sum outcomes which benefited national workforces in stronger structural positions. In the second process, during which a crisis resulting from the earlier actions of labour occurred, lack of solidarity reinforced effects of competition. -- .

Legacy Of A Divided Nation India's Muslims From Independence To Ayodhya

Legacy Of A Divided Nation India's Muslims From Independence To Ayodhya

Author: Mushirul Hasan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/03/2020

This book is regarded as a personal manifesto, a statement through the history of partition and its aftermath, of the values which India's Muslims should cherish and of the national priorities they should promote. It provides the reference-point for understanding India's Partition and its legacy.

Imperialism and the Developing World How Britain and the United States Shaped the Global Periphery

Imperialism and the Developing World How Britain and the United States Shaped the Global Periphery

How did Western imperialism shape the developing world? In Imperialism and the Developing World, Atul Kohli tackles this question by analyzing British and American influence on Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America from the age of the British East India Company to the most recent U.S. war in Iraq. He argues that both Britain and the U.S. expanded to enhance their national economic prosperity, and shows how Anglo-American expansionism hurt economic development in poor parts of the world. To clarify the causes and consequences of modern imperialism, Kohli first explains that there are two kinds of empires and analyzes the dynamics of both. Imperialism can refer to a formal, colonial empire such as Britain in the 19th century or an informal empire, wielding significant influence but not territorial control, such as the U.S. in the 20th century. Kohli contends that both have repeatedly undermined the prospects of steady economic progress in the global periphery, though to different degrees. Time and again, the pursuit of their own national economic prosperity led Britain and the U.S. to expand into peripheral areas of the world. Limiting the sovereignty of other states-and poor and weak states on the periphery in particular-was the main method of imperialism. For the British and American empires, this tactic ensured that peripheral economies would stay open and accessible to Anglo-American economic interests. Loss of sovereignty, however, greatly hurt the life chances of people living in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. As Kohli lays bare, sovereignty is an economic asset; it is a precondition for the emergence of states that can foster prosperous and inclusive industrial societies.

Contested Britain Brexit, Austerity and Agency

Contested Britain Brexit, Austerity and Agency

Author: Marius Guderjan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/03/2020

A distinctive analysis of how the politics of the UK and the lives of British citizens have evolved in the first decades of the twenty-first century, this international book provides an interdisciplinary critical examination of the roots, motivations and interconnectedness of austerity politics, the Brexit vote and the rise of populist politics in the Britain that brings together case studies and perspectives from researchers across the social sciences.

Comparative Politics

Comparative Politics

With unparalleled empirical material, this is the most comprehensive introduction to comparative politics written by the leading experts in the field who bring together a diverse and informed international perspective on comparative politics. Five new authors join the team for the fifth edition, bringing fresh ideas and insights to the comparative analysis the book provides. The new edition has been brought fully up to date with coverage of Brexit, Trump and the resurgence of Populism, and a greater focus on developing countries through a reworked Chapter 15 on Regions and Ethnicity. Furthermore, the chapter on Political Culture includes more in-depth coverage of gender and representation in the era of the #MeToo movement. Importantly, issues around migration and how different countries respond are explored in Chapter 24 on Globalization. An unrivalled amount of empirical material in the text and in the supporting online resources illustrates key similarities and differences of political systems in practice. The wealth of empirical data also encourages students to go beyond the 'what' of comparison to the 'how'. Combining cutting edge treatment of theories and truly global geographical coverage, this exciting textbook is essential reading for all comparative politics students.

Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop The Case for Multiparty Democracy in America

Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop The Case for Multiparty Democracy in America

Author: Lee (Senior Fellow, Senior Fellow, New America Foundation) Drutman Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/03/2020

American democracy is in deep crisis. But what do we do about it? That depends on how we understand what the crisis actually is. In Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop, Lee Drutman argues that we now have, for the first time in American history, a true two-party system, with two disciplined, national parties. And it's a disaster. It's driving us apart instead of bringing us together. And it's fundamentally at odds with our anti-majoritarian, compromise-oriented governing institutions. The conflict is unsustainable. Deftly weaving together history, democratic theory, and cutting edge political science research, Drutman tells the story of how American politics became so toxic, and why the country is trapped in a doom loop of escalating two-party warfare, and why it is destroying the shared sense of fairness and legitimacy on which democracy depends. The only way out is to have more partisanship-more parties, to short-circuit the zero-sum nature of binary partisan conflict. As he shows, the American system used to work because the two parties held within them multiple factions, which made it possible to assemble flexible majorities and kept the temperature of political combat from overheating. But as conservative Southern Democrats and liberal Northeastern Republicans disappeared, partisan conflict flattened and pulled apart. Once the parties became fully nationalized-a long-germinating process that culminated in 2010-toxic partisanship became the order of the day. With the two parties divided over competing visions of national identity, Democrats and Republicans no longer see each other as opponents, but as enemies. And the more the conflict escalates, the shakier our democracy feels. Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop makes a compelling case for large scale electoral reform-importantly, reform not requiring a constitutional amendment-that would give America more parties, making American democracy more representative, more responsive, and ultimately more stable.

Coalitional Presidentialism in Comparative Perspective Minority Presidents in Multiparty Systems

Coalitional Presidentialism in Comparative Perspective Minority Presidents in Multiparty Systems

This book provides the first cross-regional study of an increasingly important form of politics: coalitional presidentialism. Drawing on original research of minority presidents in the democratising and hybrid regimes of Armenia, Benin, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Kenya, Malawi, Russia, and Ukraine, it seeks to understand how presidents who lack single party legislative majorities build and manage cross-party support in legislative assemblies. It develops a framework for analysing this phenomenon, and blends data from MP surveys, detailed case studies, and wider legislative and political contexts, to analyse systematically the tools that presidents deploy to manage their coalitions. The authors focus on five key legislative, cabinet, partisan, budget, and informal (exchange of favours) tools that are utilised by minority presidents. They contend that these constitute the 'toolbox' for coalition management, and argue that minority presidents will act with imperfect or incomplete information to deploy tools that provide the highest return of political support with the lowest expenditure of political capital. In developing this analysis, the book assembles a set of concepts, definitions, indicators, analytical frameworks, and propositions that establish the main parameters of coalitional presidentialism. In this way, Coalitional Presidentialism in Comparative Perspective provides crucial insights into this mode of governance. Oxford Studies in Democratization is a series for scholars and students of comparative politics and related disciplines. Volumes concentrate on the comparative study of the democratization process that accompanied the decline and termination of the cold war. The geographical focus of the series is primarily Latin America, the Caribbean, Southern and Eastern Europe, and relevant experiences in Africa and Asia. The series editor is Laurence Whitehead, Senior Research Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

Divested Inequality in Financialized America

Divested Inequality in Financialized America

Finance is an inescapable part of American life. From how one pursues an education, buys a home, runs a business, or saves for retirement, finance orders the lives of ordinary Americans. And as finance continues to expand, inequality soars. In Divested, Ken-Hou Lin and Megan Tobias Neely demonstrate why widening inequality cannot be understood without examining the rise of big finance. The growth of the financial sector has dramatically transformed the American economy by redistributing resources from workers and families into the hands of owners, executives, and financial professionals. The average American is now divested from a world driven by the maximization of financial profit. Lin and Neely provide systematic evidence to document how the ascendance of finance on Wall Street, Main Street, and among households is a fundamental cause of economic inequality. They argue that finance has reshaped the economy in three important ways. First, the financial sector extracts resources from the economy at large without providing economic benefits to those outside the financial services industry. Second, firms in other economic sectors have become increasingly involved in lending and investing, which weakens the demand for labor and the bargaining power of workers. And third, the escalating consumption of financial products by households shifts risks and uncertainties once shouldered by unions, corporations, and governments onto families. A clear, comprehensive, and convincing account of the forces driving economic inequality in America, Divested warns us that the most damaging consequence of the expanding financial system is not simply recurrent financial crises but a widening social divide between the have and have-nots.

Thou Shalt Have No Other Gods before Me Why Governments Discriminate against Minorities

Thou Shalt Have No Other Gods before Me Why Governments Discriminate against Minorities

Author: Jonathan (Bar-Ilan University, Israel) Fox Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/02/2020

This book is among the most thorough and comprehensive analysis of the causes of religious discrimination to date, complete with detailed illustrations and anecdotes. Jonathan Fox examines the causes of government-based religious discrimination (GRD) against 771 minorities in 183 countries over the course of twenty-five years, while offering possible reasons for why some minorities are discriminated against more than others. Fox illustrates the complexities inherent in the causes of GRD, which can emerge from secular ideologies, religious monopolies, anti-cult policies, security concerns and more. Western democracies tend to discriminate more than Christian-majority countries in the developing world, whether they are democratic or not. While the causes of GRD are ubiquitous, they play out in vastly different ways across world regions and religious traditions. This book serves as a method for better understanding this particular form of discrimination, so that we may have the tools to better combat it and foster compassion across people of different religions and cultures.

Salafism in the Maghreb Politics, Piety, and Militancy

Salafism in the Maghreb Politics, Piety, and Militancy

The Arab Maghreb-the long stretch of North Africa that expands from Libya to Mauritania-is a vitally important region that impacts the security and politics of Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and the broader Middle East. As Middle East scholars Frederic Wehrey and Anouar Boukhars show in Salafism in the Maghreb, it is also home to the conservative, literalist interpretation of Islam known as Salafism, which has emerged as a major social and political force. Through extensive interviews and fieldwork, Wehrey and Boukhars examine the many roles and manifestations of Salafism in the Maghreb, looking at the relationship between Salafism and the Maghreb's ruling regimes, as well as competing Islamist currents, increasingly youthful populations, and communal groups like tribes and ethno-linguistic minorities. They pay particular attention to how seemingly immutable Salafi ideology is often shaped by local contexts and opportunities. Informed by rigorous research, deep empathy, and unparalleled access to Salafi adherents, clerics, politicians, and militants, Salafism in the Maghreb offers a definitive account of this important Islamist current.

White Privilege What Everyone Needs to Know (R)

White Privilege What Everyone Needs to Know (R)

The topic of white privilege has always triggered widespread debate, and the current media attention to police brutality and race relations in the United States has infused the conversation with highly polarizing, emotional responses. What is missing, however, is a nuanced discussion of the subject that can potentially move us beyond such contentious divisions. In White Privilege: What Everyone Needs to Know (R), Abby Ferber fills this need and provides succinct but in-depth coverage that will serve as a solid foundation for educated conversation. She touches on the essential components of white privilege-its history, how it operates, how it is discussed publicly, and how it intersects with other kinds of privilege, including gender, sexuality, and disability. While the book focuses primarily on white privilege in the US, Ferber notes how it is experienced globally. Ferber addresses common misconceptions about privilege (e.g., How can I be privileged if I face discrimination too? How can people alive now be held responsible for historical injustices, such as slavery?), and concludes with a section on how white privilege is changing now and into the future.

Upending American Politics Polarizing Parties, Ideological Elites, and Citizen Activists from the Tea Party to the Anti-Trump Resistance

Upending American Politics Polarizing Parties, Ideological Elites, and Citizen Activists from the Tea Party to the Anti-Trump Resistance

The election of Barack Obama in 2008 was startling, as was the victory of Donald Trump eight years later. Because both presidents were unusual and gained office backed by Congresses controlled by their own parties, their elections kick-started massive counter-movements. The Tea Party starting in 2009 and the resistance after November 2016 transformed America's political landscape. Upending American Politics offers a fresh perspective on recent upheavals, tracking the emergence and spread of local voluntary citizens' groups, the ongoing activities of elite advocacy organizations and consortia of wealthy donors, and the impact of popular and elite efforts on the two major political parties and candidate-led political campaigns. Going well beyond national surveys, Theda Skocpol, Caroline Tervo, and their contributors use organizational documents, interviews, and local visits to probe changing organizational configurations at the national level and in swing states. This volume analyzes conservative politics in the first section and progressive responses in the second to provide a clear overview of US politics as a whole. By highlighting evidence from the state level, it also reveals the important interplay of local and national trends.