LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Universities

See below for a selection of the latest books from Universities category. Presented with a red border are the Universities books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Universities books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

China's Universities, 1895-1995 A Century of Cultural Conflict

China's Universities, 1895-1995 A Century of Cultural Conflict

Author: Ruth Hayhoe Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/07/2019

This reissue (1996) provides an in-depth analysis of the development of the Chinese university during the twentieth century - a period of momentous social, economic, cultural and political change. It brings together reflections on the Chinese university and its role in the two great experiments of modern China: Nationalist efforts to create a modern state as part of capitalist modernisation, and the Communist project of socialist construction under Soviet tutelage. In addition to these two frames of discourse, other models and patterns are examined: for instance, the persistence of cultural patterns, or Maoist revolutionary thought.

Dimensions of Impact in the Social Sciences The Case of Social Policy, Sociology and Political Science Research

Dimensions of Impact in the Social Sciences The Case of Social Policy, Sociology and Political Science Research

Author: Tina Haux Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/07/2019

This concise, informative book analyses impact across the social sciences. It draws on the analysis of the most highly ranked British impact case studies from the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, as well as fifteen interviews with senior academics, providing a longitudinal and critical framing of impact. The author concludes with valuable recommendations of how and when scholars can achieve impact.

Quality in Undergraduate Education How Powerful Knowledge Disrupts Inequality

Quality in Undergraduate Education How Powerful Knowledge Disrupts Inequality

Globally, the appetite for higher education is great, but what do students and societies gain? Quality in Undergraduate Education foregrounds the importance of knowledge acquisition at university. Many argue that university education is no longer a public good due to the costs incurred by students who are then motivated by the promise of lucrative employment rather than by studying a discipline for its own sake. McLean, Abbas and Ashwin, however, reveal a more complex picture and offer a way of thinking about good quality university education for all. Drawing on a study which focused on four sociology-related social science UK university departments of different reputation, the book shows that students value sociological knowledge because it gives them a framework to think about and act on understanding how individuals and society interact. Further, the authors discuss how what was learned from the study about how policy, curriculum and pedagogy might preserve and strengthen the personal and social gains of social science undergraduate education.

The Instrumental University Education in Service of the National Agenda after World War II

The Instrumental University Education in Service of the National Agenda after World War II

Author: Ethan Schrum Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/06/2019

In The Instrumental University, Ethan Schrum provides an illuminating genealogy of the educational environment in which administrators, professors, and students live and work today. After World War II, research universities in the United States underwent a profound mission change. The Instrumental University combines intellectual, institutional, and political history to reinterpret postwar American life through the changes in higher education. Acknowledging but rejecting the prevailing conception of the Cold War university largely dedicated to supporting national security, Schrum provides a more complete and contextualized account of the American research university between 1945 and 1970. Uncovering a pervasive instrumental understanding of higher education during that era, The Instrumental University shows that universities framed their mission around solving social problems and promoting economic development as central institutions in what would soon be called the knowledge economy. In so doing, these institutions took on more capitalistic and managerial tendencies and, as a result, marginalized founding ideals, such as pursuit of knowledge in academic disciplines and freedom of individual investigators. The technocratic turn eroded some practices that made the American university special. Yet, as Schrum suggests, the instrumental university was not yet the neoliberal university of the 1970s and onwards in which market considerations trumped all others. University of California president Clark Kerr and other innovators in higher education were driven by a progressive impulse that drew on an earlier tradition grounded in a concern for the common good and social welfare.

The Coddling of the American Mind How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure

The Coddling of the American Mind How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure

Author: Jonathan Haidt, Greg Lukianoff Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/06/2019

The New York Times bestseller Financial Times, TLS, Evening Standard, New Statesman Books of the Year 'Excellent, their advice is sound . . . liberal parents, in particular, should read it' Financial Times Have good intentions, over-parenting and the decline in unsupervised play led to the emergence of modern identity politics and hypersensitivity? In this book, free speech campaigner Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt investigate a new cultural phenomenon of safetyism , beginning on American college campuses in 2014 and spreading throughout academic institutions in the English-speaking world. Looking at the consequences of paranoid parenting, the increase in anxiety and depression amongst students and the rise of new ideas about justice, Lukianoff and Haidt argue that well-intended but misguided attempts to protect young people are damaging their development and mental health, the functioning of educational systems and even democracy itself.

Ever True The 150-Year Story of Purdue University

Ever True The 150-Year Story of Purdue University

Author: John Norberg Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/05/2019

In 1869 the Stateof Indiana founded Purdue University as Indiana's land-grantuniversity dedicated to agriculture and engineering. Today, Purdue standsas one of the elite research and education institutions in the world. Its hallshave been home to Nobel Prize- and World Food Prize-winningfaculty, record-setting astronauts, laurelled humanists, researchers,and leaders of industry. Its thirteen colleges and schools span the sciences,liberal arts, management, and veterinary medicine, boasting morethan 450,000 living alumni. Ever True: TheFirst 150 Years of Purdue University by John Norberg captures the essence of this great university.In this volume, Norberg takes readers beyond the iconic redbrick walls of Purdue University's West Lafayette campus to delve into the stories of the faculty, alumni, and leaders who make up this remarkable institution's distinguished history.Written to commemorate Purdue University's sesquicentennial celebrations, EverTrue picks up where prior histories leave off, bringing the intricacies of historic tales to the forefront, updating the Purdue story to the present, and looking to the future.

Making the World Global U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary

Making the World Global U.S. Universities and the Production of the Global Imaginary

Author: Isaac A. Kamola Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/05/2019

Following World War II the American government and philanthropic foundations fundamentally remade American universities into sites for producing knowledge about the world as a collection of distinct nation-states. As neoliberal reforms took hold in the 1980s, visions of the world made popular within area studies and international studies found themselves challenged by ideas and educational policies that originated in business schools and international financial institutions. Academics within these institutions reimagined the world instead as a single global market and higher education as a commodity to be bought and sold. By the 1990s, American universities embraced this language of globalization, and globalization eventually became the organizing logic of higher education. In Making the World Global Isaac A. Kamola examines how the relationships among universities, the American state, philanthropic organizations, and international financial institutions created the conditions that made it possible to imagine the world as global. Examining the Center for International Studies, Harvard Business School, the World Bank, the Social Science Research Council, and NYU, Kamola demonstrates that how we imagine the world is always symptomatic of the material relations within which knowledge is produced.

University-Community Relations in the UK Engaging Universities

University-Community Relations in the UK Engaging Universities

Author: Carolyn Kagan, John Diamond Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/05/2019

This is a fascinating, scholarly and informative synthesis of the history of UK community-university engagement and will be essential reading for anyone who wants to make sense of the past in order to progress future agendas in this area. A great read. -Angie Hart, Academic Director, Community University Partnership Programme, University of Brighton, UK This book is pertinent for an in-depth understanding of University-Community partnerships that challenge all European Universities. The notions of engagement, reciprocity or mutuality differ according to the socio-political context, civic traditions and social policies of the European regions. This book is a must read for those who want to make a difference in their Universities and their Communities. -Maria Vargas-Moniz, President of the European Community Psychology Association. Kagan and Diamond's analysis of University-Community engagement in England, is highly relevant for the challenges facing higher education in many places but particularly in Mexico where higher education has to move from existing verticality and authoritarianism, to become socially more relevant. -Eduardo Almeida Acosta, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico. This book examines and analyses the complex and contradictory relationships between Higher Education Institutions in England and their local communities within a wider political and policy context. It provides an overview of the UK university system which has a long tradition of a mixed pattern of relationships with communities. The book critically explores the academic spheres of teaching and learning, third stream activities and research, showing how the ways in which different initiatives supported by national policy and funding bodies have shaped the relationship universities have with their communities as well as the opportunities and challenges institutions now face to develop and transform these relationships.

Re-envisioning the Public Research University Tensions and Demands

Re-envisioning the Public Research University Tensions and Demands

Author: Andrew Furco Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/05/2019

In this edited collection, contributors explore how contemporary tensions and demands on public research universities influence and transform institutional policies, structures, and culture as these institutions strive to remain relevant and competitive. With a focus on one Midwestern university, this volume hones in on how public research universities repurpose themselves to address many contemporary challenges, including globalization, interdisiplinarity, public engagement, and the role of technology in higher education. Each chapter identifies a critical issue that today's public research universities face and offer diverse perspectives on ways to navigate and overcome these tensions.

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctorate The Importance of Supervision, Networking and Becoming a Global Academic

Getting the Most Out of Your Doctorate The Importance of Supervision, Networking and Becoming a Global Academic

Author: Mollie Dollinger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/05/2019

Beyond the doctoral thesis itself, the most significant factors in the progression of PhD candidature and early academic careers are: the relationships between the researcher and their supervisor(s), the ability to network, and understanding one's place in the global research arena. Navigating these critical factors and moving from a novice to expert, is a critical undertaking for every PhD candidate and a process that will continue for years following one's PhD. In this book, scholars from around the world offer practical advice on how to get the most out of one's doctorate. Readers will get helpful tips on how to sustain healthy and long-lasting relationships with their supervisors, learn how to develop their networks, and understand the important changes impacting the modern PhD candidate.

Las Vegas A Centennial History

Las Vegas A Centennial History

Author: Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/05/2019

Since Las Vegas was founded on May 15, 1905, when the Union Pacific auctioned off land around its new railroad shops, the city has grown from a ramshackle village to a sprawling metropolitan area of well over a million people. Such phenomenal growth was never a sure thing - in its first decades, the town languished as a railroad company town and market center for nearby ranches and mines. The construction of Hoover Dam in the 1930s brought thousands of workers, some of whom decided to stay, and World War II and the Cold War brought others, including military personnel and workers at the Nevada Test Site. But it was when Nevada legalized casino gambling in 1931 that Las Vegas met its destiny. This act, combined with the growing popularity of the automobile, cheap land and electricity, and changing national attitudes toward gambling, led to the fantastical casinos and opulent resorts that became the trademark industry of the city and created the ambiance that has made Las Vegas an international icon of pleasure and entertainment. Eugene Moehring and Michael Green have studied and written about Las Vegas for many years, and in Las Vegas: A Centennial History they offer a detailed and deeply knowledgeable account of the growth of this unique city, the impact of politics and of wars, and the city's struggle to establish diversified economy. Here are the larger-than-life characters who shaped the city, as well as the business and civic decisions. The authors' scope extends chronologically from the first Paiute people who settled around the artesian springs that gave the city its name, right up to the construction of the latest megaresort, and geographically far beyond the original township to include the several municipalities that make up the metropolitan Las Vegas area. They consider various aspects of city building such as the role of developers; the creation of infrastructure, services, and transportation; the struggle to obtain a reliable source of water; the function of cultural, civic, educational, and religious institutions; and of ethnic minorities. Las Vegas: A Centennial History celebrates the city's unparalleled growth in the brief century of its existence. It also offers fresh insight into the process of city building in the American West, where urban needs and aspirations must contend with water scarcity, isolation, erratic economies, highly diverse populations, and the rocky relationship between the need for civic order and the Western spirit of independence. That Las Vegas has become one of the nation's major cities in so brief a time reflects the prodigious energies of its people and a happy convergence of events and circumstances. Its story will engage residents and visitors alike, as well as all readers interested in the history and workings of an American city.

A Conflict of Principles The Battle Over Affirmative Action at the University of Michigan

A Conflict of Principles The Battle Over Affirmative Action at the University of Michigan

Author: Carl Cohen Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/05/2019

No state . . . shall deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. So says the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution, a document held dear by Carl Cohen, a professor of philosophy and longtime champion of civil liberties who has devoted most of his adult life to the University of Michigan. So when Cohen discovered, after encountering some resistance, how his school, in its admirable wish to increase minority enrollment, was actually practicing a form of racial discrimination--calling it affirmative action --he found himself at odds with his longtime allies and colleagues in an effort to defend the equal treatment of the races at his university. In A Conflict of Principles Cohen tells the story of what happened at Michigan, how racial preferences were devised and implemented there, and what was at stake in the heated and divisive controversy that ensued. He gives voice to the judicious and seldom heard liberal argument against affirmative action in college admission policies. In the early 1970s, as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Civil Liberties Union, Cohen vigorously supported programs devised to encourage the recruitment of minorities in colleges, and in private employment. But some of these efforts gave deliberate preference to blacks and Hispanics seeking university admission, and this Cohen recognized as a form of racism, however well-meaning. In his book he recounts the fortunes of contested affirmative action programs as they made their way through the legal system to the Supreme Court, beginning with DeFunis v. Odegaard (1974) at the University of Washington Law School, then Bakke v. Regents of the University of California (1978) at the Medical School on the UC Davis campus, and culminating at the University of Michigan in the landmark cases of Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger (2003). He recounts his role in the initiation of the Michigan cases, explaining the many arguments against racial preferences in college admissions. He presents a principled case for the resultant amendment to the Michigan constitution, of which he was a prominent advocate, which prohibited preference by race in public employment and public contracting, as well as in public education. An eminently readable personal, consistently fair-minded account of the principles and politics that come into play in the struggles over affirmative action, A Conflict of Principles is a deeply thoughtful and thought-provoking contribution to our national conversation about race.