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Inclusive education / mainstreaming

See below for a selection of the latest books from Inclusive education / mainstreaming category. Presented with a red border are the Inclusive education / mainstreaming books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Inclusive education / mainstreaming books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

A Little Guide for Teachers: Diversity in Schools

A Little Guide for Teachers: Diversity in Schools

Author: Bennie Kara Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/10/2020

A Little Guide for Teachers: Diversity in Schools aims to provide starting points for teachers and leaders in creating a curriculum, either across disciplines or within subjects, that is as deep and diverse as their students. The Little Guide for Teachers series is little in size but BIG on all the support and inspiration you need to navigate your day to day life as a teacher. * Authored by experts in the field * Easy to dip in-and-out of * Interactive activities encourage you to write into the book and make it your own * Fun engaging illustrations throughout * Read in an afternoon or take as long as you like with it!

The Nicaraguan Literacy Campaign

The Nicaraguan Literacy Campaign

Author: Delane A Bender-Slack Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/10/2020

The author argues that modern notions of literacy can and should be informed by past successes in the field of literacy, but that there may be geographic and linguistic obstacles to knowing about them. Consequently, this book offers a view of the 1980 Cruzada Nacional de Alfabetizacion (CNA) or the National Literacy Crusade through the lens of a contemporary literacy professional in the United States. The goals of this book are to critically examine an important moment in the global history of literacy, celebrate the many successes of the crusade, analyze the transformative possibilities of such an endeavor, uncover the implications of the campaign for literacy today, and share an understanding of this historical event with an English-speaking audience. Practicing teachers, preservice teachers, teacher educators, and those interested in transforming education will read this book and engage in critical, collegial dialogue about what we do in schools, why we do what we do, and what might need to change in order to better meet the needs of our students, their teachers, and our democracy.

Whiteness at the Table

Whiteness at the Table

Author: Christina Berchini Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2020

Antiracist work in education has proceeded as if the only social relation at issue is the one between white people and people of color. But what if our antiracist efforts are being undermined by unexamined difficulties and struggles among white people? Whiteness at the Table examines whiteness in the lived experiences of young children, family members, students, teachers, and school administrators. It focuses on racism and antiracism within the context of relationships. Its authors argue that we cannot read or understand whiteness as a phenomenon without attending to the everyday complexities and conflicts of white people's lives. This edited volume is entitled Whiteness at the Table, then, for at least three reasons. First, the title evokes the origins of this book in the ongoing storytelling and theorizing of the Midwest Critical Whiteness Collective--a small collective of antiracist educators, scholars, and activists who have been gathering at its founders' dining room table for almost a decade. Second, the book's authors are theorizing whiteness not just in terms of structural aspects of white power, but in terms of how whiteness is reproduced and challenged in the day-to-day interactions and relationships of white people. In this sense, whiteness is always already at the table, and this book seeks to illuminate how and why this is so. Finally, one of the primary aims of Whiteness at the Table is to persuade white people of their moral and political responsibility to bring whiteness--as an explicit topic, as perhaps the most important problem to be solved at this historical moment--to the table. This responsibility to theorize and combat whiteness cannot and should not fall only to people of color.

Learning to Leave

Learning to Leave

Author: Michael Corbett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2020

Published with a new preface, this innovative case study from Nova Scotia analyzes the relationship between rural communities and contemporary education. Rather than supporting place-sensitive curricula and establishing networks within community populations, the rural school has too often stood apart from local life, with the generally unintended consequence that many educationally successful rural youth come to see their communities and lifestyles as places to be left behind. They face what Michael Corbett calls a mobility imperative, which, he shows, has been central to contemporary schooling. Learning to Leave argues that if education is to be democratic and serve the purpose of economic, social, and cultural development, then it must adapt and respond to the specificity of its locale, the knowledge practices of the people, and the needs of those who struggle to remain in challenged rural places.

Doing Social Justice Education

Doing Social Justice Education

Author: D. Scott Tharp, Roger A. Moreano Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2020

This book is principally written for entry-level student affairs and non-profit staff who develop and facilitate social justice education workshops and structured conversations, as well as for student peer educators who are often employed to assist in the facilitation of such workshops for their peers. It is suitable for anyone starting out to do such work. It provides readers with a practical framework and hands-on tools to craft effective and positive interventions and workshops that are relevant to context and are true to the facilitator's own circumstances. It offers a succinct but comprehensive introduction to the planning, design, and facilitation of social justice experiences, grounding readers in relevant theory, taking into account participants' prior understandings of issues of race and privilege, institutional environment and campus climate, and the facilitator's positionality. It provides guidance on defining outcomes and developing content and exercises to achieve workshop goals. Starting from the premise that the facilitation and delivery of social justice education experiences should be grounded in scholarship and that such experiences can only achieve their ends if crafted to meet the unique characteristics and circumstances of the institution and workshop participants, the authors begin by synthesizing current theory on social justice education and cultural competence, and then guiding readers on analyzing the context and purpose of their workshop. They provide readers with an easy to follow five-part framework to systematically design social justice education workshops and structured conversations and to assess the resulting learning. Particularly valuable for those starting out in this work is guidance on facilitation and on the use and selection of exercises to align with goals and participants' characteristics and social identities.

Doing Social Justice Education

Doing Social Justice Education

Author: D. Scott Tharp, Roger A. Moreano Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/2020

This book is principally written for entry-level student affairs and non-profit staff who develop and facilitate social justice education workshops and structured conversations, as well as for student peer educators who are often employed to assist in the facilitation of such workshops for their peers. It is suitable for anyone starting out to do such work. It provides readers with a practical framework and hands-on tools to craft effective and positive interventions and workshops that are relevant to context and are true to the facilitator's own circumstances. It offers a succinct but comprehensive introduction to the planning, design, and facilitation of social justice experiences, grounding readers in relevant theory, taking into account participants' prior understandings of issues of race and privilege, institutional environment and campus climate, and the facilitator's positionality. It provides guidance on defining outcomes and developing content and exercises to achieve workshop goals. Starting from the premise that the facilitation and delivery of social justice education experiences should be grounded in scholarship and that such experiences can only achieve their ends if crafted to meet the unique characteristics and circumstances of the institution and workshop participants, the authors begin by synthesizing current theory on social justice education and cultural competence, and then guiding readers on analyzing the context and purpose of their workshop. They provide readers with an easy to follow five-part framework to systematically design social justice education workshops and structured conversations and to assess the resulting learning. Particularly valuable for those starting out in this work is guidance on facilitation and on the use and selection of exercises to align with goals and participants' characteristics and social identities.

Towards Inclusive Schools?

Towards Inclusive Schools?

Author: Catherine Clark Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2020

First published in 1995. Notions of 'inclusive schools' and 'schooling for diversity' are rapidly gaining currency across the developed world as alternatives to traditional approaches to special needs education. This book explores the advances in our understanding of how schools can change and develop in order to include a wider range of students. By bringing together some of the foremost international writers and researchers in the field, it makes available to policy makers, practitioners and researchers the experiences from Australia, Europe, New Zealand, the UK and the USA.

Teaching Fairly in an Unfair World

Teaching Fairly in an Unfair World

Author: Kathleen Gould Lundy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2020

This era of fake news demands a deeper curriculum that questions inconsistencies of facts and opinions in various texts and images. This timely revision of a ground-breaking book offers opportunities for students to connect with social justice issues through inventive language exploration and the active examination of all forms of media. It encourages teachers to evaluate their core teaching beliefs and recognize the realities of their students' lives for a richer understanding of our complex world. A glossary of more than fifty strategies, along with reproducible pages for easy classroom use, complement this essential resource.

Ability, Equity & Culture

Ability, Equity & Culture

Author: Elizabeth B. Kozleski Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/07/2020

This comprehensive book is grounded in the authentic experiences of educators who have done, and continue to do, the messy everyday work of transformative school reform. The work of these contributors, in conjunction with research done under the aegis of the National Institute of Urban School Improvement (NIUSI), demonstrates how schools and classrooms can move from a deficit model to a culturally responsive model that works for all learners. To strengthen relationships between research and practise, chapters are coauthored by a practitioner/researcher team and include a case study of an authentic urban reform situation. This volume will help practitioners, reformers, and researchers make use of emerging knowledge and culturally responsive pedagogy to implement reforms that are more congruent with the strengths and needs of urban education contexts.

Challenging Stories

Challenging Stories

Author: Anne Burke Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/07/2020

Despite an increase in efforts to promote equity and social justice in educational settings, researchers have found that teachers at the elementary, middle school, and secondary school levels are both reluctant and unaware of how to present social justice issues in the classroom. Inspired by these findings, a team of literacy scholars gathered qualitative research from eight schools across Canada to reveal what challenges literacy teachers face when incorporating social justice in their curricula. Rich in examples of contemporary Canadian social justice authors, illustrators, and texts, Challenging Stories equips teachers and teacher candidates with strategies for text selection, literacy development, and effective social justice teaching methods. With a foreword by Joyce Bainbridge, this collection is an essential read for students in teacher education programs.

Educators on Diversity, Social Justice, and Schooling

Educators on Diversity, Social Justice, and Schooling

Author: Sonya E. Singer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/07/2020

In their new critical reader, editors Mary Jane Harkins and Sonya E. Singer argue that `sorting' ourselves into identity categories results in sexism, racism, heterosexism, homophobia, classism, ableism, and other `isms'. This book's 19 innovative chapters invite educators, teachers and education students to reflect on schooling practices as a contextualized social process, which requires having and retaining at the forefront of thinking, the intricate inter-weavings of the systemic and cultural impact of race, gender, class, sexuality and ability on the everyday lives of students.

The Blab of the Paved Bad Kids and the School They Called Family

The Blab of the Paved Bad Kids and the School They Called Family

Author: Jeff Spanke Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2020

This narrative ethnography adopts an aesthetic lens to relay the various lived experiences of a non-traditional, Midwestern public high school during its final year in its original building. Extending upon previous research of high school dropouts, I examine how this one particular high school incorporated a self-paced curriculum with a focus on family to address the unique learning needs of students at risk of not graduating. By employing elements of grounded theory, narrative inquiry, and autoethnography, I share the stories of Walgut High School's (a pseudonym) roughly sixty students as they struggle to navigate their respective roles in a dominant cultural narrative to which they've never felt like they belonged. Through the extensive and organic voices of the primary participants-as well as my observations of my own participation in the school culture over the course of a year-this project serves to offer insights not only into the school experiences of marginalized adolescents, but also into Walgut's myriad successes and failures. In particular, this piece highlights the vitality of unconditionally caring or hospitable teachers (Derrida, 2000), while ultimately questioning the presumed utility of a high school diploma. The story concludes not by lauding the alternative mine created for Walgut's canaries, but by questioning the purpose and stability of all scholastic minds. As American schools continue making strides to accommodate and support the complex and oftentimes contradictory needs of their students, what it means to succeed as a teacher in (and prepare teachers for) these diversified, inclusive learning spaces is growing increasingly complicated. Indeed, given the shifting paradigm of American public education, teacher preparation programs must continue to adapt their practices and philosophies in order to equip their teacher candidates with the skills needed not only to thrive but also find purpose and meaning in schools similar to this project's Walgut. While this book doesn't claim to offer any answers to the myriad questions concerning the future of public schools, it does endeavor to offer a springboard from which all education stakeholders can continue engaging in healthy and productive discussions of how best to prepare students (and teachers) for autonomous, democratic, curious, creative, and compassionate citizenship both in and apart from their academic communities. To this end, rather than write from a detached, traditionally academic vantage, I have sought in these pages to compose from a personal (albeit limited), passionate (albeit subjective) and participatory (albeit someone marginalized) perspective. In my pursuit of social justice for the characters of Walgut High School, I begin first by exposing my own privileged role in perpetuating injustice. Only through recognizing and naming our own demons can we ever begin to exorcize the System writ large. Thus, in this book's lack, there is possibility; in its futility, hope.