LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Moral & social purpose of education

See below for a selection of the latest books from Moral & social purpose of education category. Presented with a red border are the Moral & social purpose of education books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Moral & social purpose of education books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Race, Equality and Schools

Race, Equality and Schools

Author: Richard Willey Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2020

Originally published in 1984. How to respond to ethnic diversity is a question of major importance for teachers. The multi-ethnic school is only one aspect of a multi-ethnic society, and the problems and complexities teachers face have far-reaching implications. Attention has turned from fitting minority ethnic groups into existing education systems to achieving equality in a multi-ethnic society, with consequent questions about and changes in the practice of teaching. This book guides the reader through the complexities of changes in the field of race and education, examining developments in both policy and practice. It looks at the radical answers which were developing within a number of national education systems - in Britain, Australia, Canada, the US and elsewhere, and at the teachers' practical responses to the pressing problems.

Racism in Children's Lives A Study of Mainly-white Primary Schools

Racism in Children's Lives A Study of Mainly-white Primary Schools

Author: Barry Troyna, Richard Hatcher Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2020

Originally published in 1992. Both teachers and the general public have traditionally been unwilling to acknowledge that concepts of 'race' might play a part in the lives of primary school children. For this book the authors spent a term in each of three mainly white primary schools. They talked to black and white pupils individually and in small groups about issues, not necessarily of 'race', which the children themselves saw as important. From these conversations they present a fascinating study of how 'race' emerges for young children as a plausible explanatory framework for incidents in their everyday lives. The final picture is both disturbing in its demonstration of how significant racism is and hopeful in showing how frequently anti-racist attitudes exist even in the thinking of children who engage in racist behaviour. A final chapter looks at how school policy can combat racism and build on these positive elements.

Race Relations in the Primary School

Race Relations in the Primary School

Author: Cecile (University of Nottingham, UK) Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2020

Originally published in 1992. This book presents research carried out by the author in four inner-city primary schools. It documents the experiences of black and Asian children, particularly in interaction with their white peers, and with their teachers, from both observation and interviews with parents, teachers and the children. It presents cases both inside and outside the classroom. The children's academic progress is also examined, and the book considers the link between home and school. The concluding chapter is concerned with measures for promoting 'good practice' in the primary school context.

History and Citizenship Education in Post-Mao China Politics, Policy, Praxis

History and Citizenship Education in Post-Mao China Politics, Policy, Praxis

Author: Alisa (Stanford University, USA) Jones Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/02/2020

This book examines the development of education in China over the past three decades, exploring the ways in which the manifold 'contradictions' both within and between policy prescriptions, pedagogical theory and classroom implementation have been handled where issues of political socialisation, national identification and public morality are at stake.

: Teachers (1994) Constructing the Future

: Teachers (1994) Constructing the Future

Author: Kevin Harris Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Originally published in 1994, Teachers: Constructing a Future is designed for teachers, as well as those interested in the future of schooling and education. The book draws on sociological analysis, philosophical insights and aspects of political economy to examine the changing and developing role of teachers in the context of the current transformation of western capitalism. It considers the historical growth of teaching as a profession and as a political force, and indicates that economic rationalism has been effectively employed to elevate the instrumental role of schooling in society, and consequentially to devalue the professional and political nature of teaching.

Why Teaching Matters A Philosophical Guide to the Elements of Practice

Why Teaching Matters A Philosophical Guide to the Elements of Practice

Cultural and technological developments are changing the way we see and value teaching today. For many, what matters now are certain results teachers achieve, the instrumental utility of teaching. Why Teaching Matters takes a broader view. Teaching is as old as culture and will persist in some form as long as diverse cultural traditions, practices, and ways of life are preserved and renewed with each new generation. As an essential and problematic human activity imbued with both risk and promise, the work of teachers matters in more ways than we typically recognize. That is why teaching warrants special attention for its own sake and not only for the immediate purposes being served. As a philosophical guide, Why Teaching Matters provides a basic framework for understanding the elemental kinds of engagement that make teaching possible and also problematic. These elements of engagement include: * Conveying Care * Enacting Authority * Cultivating Virtue * Interpreting Subject Matter * Rendering Judgment * Articulating Purpose * Establishing a Sense of Place * Engaging Presence Each element is complicated, contentious, and impactful in its own way, and when combined in practice, contributes to the complexity and significance of teaching. Both those who teach, and those who care about, manage, or strive to influence the work of teachers, have a stake in better understanding teaching as the essential, problematic, and impactful form of human activity that it is, and the many ways it matters to us all.

Why Teaching Matters A Philosophical Guide to the Elements of Practice

Why Teaching Matters A Philosophical Guide to the Elements of Practice

Why Teaching Matters is an introductory guide to the core 'elements' of teaching, getting to the heart of what teaching is, and why it matters. Paul Farber and Dini Metro-Roland introduce the following 8 'elements' which encompass the many issues, themes and social complexities of teaching: - Authority - Virtue - Care - Subject matter - Judgement - Purpose - Place - Presence The elements are used to frame discussions of practical issues teachers face such as testing, technology and stress. It also provides an accessible introduction to philosophical theories from a range of thinkers including Nel Noddings, John Dewey and bel hooks that can inform a deeper understanding of teaching. The theoretical discussions are grounded with examples, case studies and anecdotes from the classroom so that theory is always connected with practice. The book also includes sample questions at the end of each chapter as well as a glossary of terms. Why Teaching Matters brings out and celebrates the inherent complexity of teaching, offering a full and practical understanding to students of education and new and experienced teachers alike.

Lad Culture in Higher Education Sexism, Sexual Harassment and Violence

Lad Culture in Higher Education Sexism, Sexual Harassment and Violence

Author: Carolyn Jackson, Vanita Sundaram Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/01/2020

Responding to increasing concerns about the harmful effects of so-called lad culture in British universities, and related bro and frat cultures in US colleges, this book is the first to explore and analyse the perspectives of university staff on these cultures, which students suggest foster the normalisation of sexism, homophobia, racism, sexual harassment and violence. Drawing on in-depth interviews with a broad range of staff and faculty across different types of universities in England, the book explores the following key questions: What is lad culture? How and where is it manifest in higher education and what are the effects on students and staff? How can laddish behaviour be explained? How can we theorise lad culture to enable us to better understand and challenge it? How do dynamics in the UK compare to so-called bro and frat cultures in US colleges? By examining the ways in which lad culture is understood and explained, the authors illustrate that current understandings of lad culture obscure the broader processes through which problematic attitudes, practices and educational climates are fostered. This enables a theorisation of lad culture that makes visible the gendered norms and intersecting structural inequalities that underpin it. This timely and accessible volume will be of great interest to anyone looking to understand and tackle sexism, sexual harassment and violence in and beyond university contexts. It will be of particular significance to researchers, undergraduate and postgraduate students, academics and policy makers in the fields of gender and sexuality in education, higher education, and sociology of education.

Old Schools Modernism, Education, and the Critique of Progress

Old Schools Modernism, Education, and the Critique of Progress

Author: Ramsey McGlazer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/01/2020

Old Schools marks out a modernist countertradition. The book makes sense of an apparent anachronism in twentieth-century literature and cinema: a fascination with outmoded, paradigmatically pre-modern educational forms that persists long after they are displaced in progressive pedagogical theories. Advocates of progressive education turned against Latin in particular. The dead language-taught through time-tested means including memorization, recitation, copying out, and other forms of repetition and recall-needed to be updated or eliminated, reformers argued, so that students could breathe free and become modern, achieving a break with convention and constraint. Yet McGlazer's remarkable book reminds us that progressive education was championed not only by political progressives, but also by Fascists in Italy, where it was an object of Gramsci's critique. Building on Gramsci's pages on the Latin class, McGlazer shows how figures in various cultural vanguards, from Victorian Britain to 1970s Brazil, returned to and reimagined the old school. Strikingly, the works that McGlazer considers valorize this school's outmoded techniques even at their most cumbersome and conventional. Like the Latin class to which they return, these works produce constraints that feel limiting but that, by virtue of that limitation, invite valuable resistance. As they turn grammar drills into verse and repetitious lectures into voiceovers, they find unlikely resources for critique in the very practices that progressive reformers sought to clear away. Registering the past's persistence even while they respond to the mounting pressures of modernization, writers and filmmakers from Pater to Joyce to Pasolini retain what might look like retrograde attachments-to tradition, transmission, scholastic rites, and repetitive forms. But the counter-progressive pedagogies that they devise repeat the past to increasingly radical effect. Old Schools teaches us that this kind of repetition can enable the change that it might seem to impede.

Old Schools Modernism, Education, and the Critique of Progress

Old Schools Modernism, Education, and the Critique of Progress

Author: Ramsey McGlazer Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/01/2020

Old Schools marks out a modernist countertradition. The book makes sense of an apparent anachronism in twentieth-century literature and cinema: a fascination with outmoded, paradigmatically pre-modern educational forms that persists long after they are displaced in progressive pedagogical theories. Advocates of progressive education turned against Latin in particular. The dead language-taught through time-tested means including memorization, recitation, copying out, and other forms of repetition and recall-needed to be updated or eliminated, reformers argued, so that students could breathe free and become modern, achieving a break with convention and constraint. Yet McGlazer's remarkable book reminds us that progressive education was championed not only by political progressives, but also by Fascists in Italy, where it was an object of Gramsci's critique. Building on Gramsci's pages on the Latin class, McGlazer shows how figures in various cultural vanguards, from Victorian Britain to 1970s Brazil, returned to and reimagined the old school. Strikingly, the works that McGlazer considers valorize this school's outmoded techniques even at their most cumbersome and conventional. Like the Latin class to which they return, these works produce constraints that feel limiting but that, by virtue of that limitation, invite valuable resistance. As they turn grammar drills into verse and repetitious lectures into voiceovers, they find unlikely resources for critique in the very practices that progressive reformers sought to clear away. Registering the past's persistence even while they respond to the mounting pressures of modernization, writers and filmmakers from Pater to Joyce to Pasolini retain what might look like retrograde attachments-to tradition, transmission, scholastic rites, and repetitive forms. But the counter-progressive pedagogies that they devise repeat the past to increasingly radical effect. Old Schools teaches us that this kind of repetition can enable the change that it might seem to impede.

Campus Diversity The Hidden Consensus

Campus Diversity The Hidden Consensus

Media, politicians, and the courts portray college campuses as divided over diversity and affirmative action. But what do students and faculty really think? This book uses a novel technique to elicit honest opinions from students and faculty and measure preferences for diversity in undergraduate admissions and faculty recruitment at seven major universities, breaking out attitudes by participants' race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, and political partisanship. Scholarly excellence is a top priority everywhere, but the authors show that when students consider individual candidates, they favor members of all traditionally underrepresented groups - by race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic background. Moreover, there is little evidence of polarization in the attitudes of different student groups. The book reveals that campus communities are less deeply divided than they are often portrayed to be; although affirmative action remains controversial in the abstract, there is broad support for prioritizing diversity in practice.

Campus Diversity The Hidden Consensus

Campus Diversity The Hidden Consensus

Media, politicians, and the courts portray college campuses as divided over diversity and affirmative action. But what do students and faculty really think? This book uses a novel technique to elicit honest opinions from students and faculty and measure preferences for diversity in undergraduate admissions and faculty recruitment at seven major universities, breaking out attitudes by participants' race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, and political partisanship. Scholarly excellence is a top priority everywhere, but the authors show that when students consider individual candidates, they favor members of all traditionally underrepresented groups - by race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic background. Moreover, there is little evidence of polarization in the attitudes of different student groups. The book reveals that campus communities are less deeply divided than they are often portrayed to be; although affirmative action remains controversial in the abstract, there is broad support for prioritizing diversity in practice.