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Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography category. Presented with a red border are the Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social & cultural anthropology, ethnography books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Sacrificial Limbs Masculinity, Disability, and Political Violence in Turkey

Sacrificial Limbs Masculinity, Disability, and Political Violence in Turkey

Author: Salih Can Aciksoz Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/12/2019

Sacrificial Limbs chronicles the everyday lives and political activism of disabled veterans of Turkey's Kurdish war, one of the most volatile conflicts in the Middle East. Through nuanced ethnographic portraits, Aciksoez examines how veterans' experiences of war and disability are closely linked to class, gender, and ultimately the embrace of ultranationalist right-wing politics. Bringing the reader into military hospitals, commemorations, political demonstrations, and veterans' everyday spaces of care, intimacy, and activism, Sacrificial Limbs provides a vivid analysis of the multiple and sometimes contradictory forces that fashion veterans' bodies, political subjectivities, and communities. It is essential reading for students and scholars interested in anthropology, masculinity, and disability.

Sacrificial Limbs Masculinity, Disability, and Political Violence in Turkey

Sacrificial Limbs Masculinity, Disability, and Political Violence in Turkey

Author: Salih Can Aciksoz Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/12/2019

Sacrificial Limbs chronicles the everyday lives and political activism of disabled veterans of Turkey's Kurdish war, one of the most volatile conflicts in the Middle East. Through nuanced ethnographic portraits, Aciksoez examines how veterans' experiences of war and disability are closely linked to class, gender, and ultimately the embrace of ultranationalist right-wing politics. Bringing the reader into military hospitals, commemorations, political demonstrations, and veterans' everyday spaces of care, intimacy, and activism, Sacrificial Limbs provides a vivid analysis of the multiple and sometimes contradictory forces that fashion veterans' bodies, political subjectivities, and communities. It is essential reading for students and scholars interested in anthropology, masculinity, and disability.

Making Global MBAs The Culture of Business and the Business of Culture

Making Global MBAs The Culture of Business and the Business of Culture

Author: Andrew Orta Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/12/2019

A generation of aspiring business managers has been taught to see a world of difference as a world of opportunity. In Making Global MBAs, Andrew Orta examines the culture of contemporary business education, and the ways MBA programs participate in the production of global capitalism through the education of the business subjects who will be managing it. Based on extensive field research in several leading US business schools, this groundbreaking ethnography exposes what the culture of MBA training says about contemporary understandings of capitalism in the context of globalization. Orta details the rituals of MBA life and the ways MBA curricula cultivate both habits of fast-paced technical competence and softer qualities and talents thought to be essential to unlocking the value of international cultural difference while managing its risks. Making Global MBAs provides an essential critique of neoliberal thinking for students and professionals in a wide variety of fields.

Making Global MBAs The Culture of Business and the Business of Culture

Making Global MBAs The Culture of Business and the Business of Culture

Author: Andrew Orta Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/12/2019

A generation of aspiring business managers has been taught to see a world of difference as a world of opportunity. In Making Global MBAs, Andrew Orta examines the culture of contemporary business education, and the ways MBA programs participate in the production of global capitalism through the education of the business subjects who will be managing it. Based on extensive field research in several leading US business schools, this groundbreaking ethnography exposes what the culture of MBA training says about contemporary understandings of capitalism in the context of globalization. Orta details the rituals of MBA life and the ways MBA curricula cultivate both habits of fast-paced technical competence and softer qualities and talents thought to be essential to unlocking the value of international cultural difference while managing its risks. Making Global MBAs provides an essential critique of neoliberal thinking for students and professionals in a wide variety of fields.

Waste Siege The Life of Infrastructure in Palestine

Waste Siege The Life of Infrastructure in Palestine

Author: Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/12/2019

Waste Siege offers an analysis unusual in the study of Palestine: it depicts the environmental, infrastructural, and aesthetic context in which Palestinians are obliged to forge their lives. To speak of waste siege is to describe a series of conditions, from smelling wastes to negotiating military infrastructures, from biopolitical forms of colonial rule to experiences of governmental abandonment, from obvious targets of resistance to confusion over responsibility for the burdensome objects of daily life. Within this rubble, debris, and infrastructural fallout, West Bank Palestinians create a life under settler colonial rule. Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins focuses on waste as an experience of everyday life that is continuous with, but not a result only of, occupation. Tracing Palestinians' own experiences of wastes over the past decade, she considers how multiple authorities governing the West Bank-including municipalities, the Palestinian Authority, international aid organizations, NGOs, and Israel-rule by waste siege, whether intentionally or not. Her work challenges both common formulations of waste as matter out of place and as the ontological opposite of the environment, by suggesting instead that waste siege be understood as an ecology of matter with no place to go. Waste siege thus not only describes a stateless Palestine, but also becomes a metaphor for our besieged planet.

Waste Siege The Life of Infrastructure in Palestine

Waste Siege The Life of Infrastructure in Palestine

Author: Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/12/2019

Waste Siege offers an analysis unusual in the study of Palestine: it depicts the environmental, infrastructural, and aesthetic context in which Palestinians are obliged to forge their lives. To speak of waste siege is to describe a series of conditions, from smelling wastes to negotiating military infrastructures, from biopolitical forms of colonial rule to experiences of governmental abandonment, from obvious targets of resistance to confusion over responsibility for the burdensome objects of daily life. Within this rubble, debris, and infrastructural fallout, West Bank Palestinians create a life under settler colonial rule. Sophia Stamatopoulou-Robbins focuses on waste as an experience of everyday life that is continuous with, but not a result only of, occupation. Tracing Palestinians' own experiences of wastes over the past decade, she considers how multiple authorities governing the West Bank-including municipalities, the Palestinian Authority, international aid organizations, NGOs, and Israel-rule by waste siege, whether intentionally or not. Her work challenges both common formulations of waste as matter out of place and as the ontological opposite of the environment, by suggesting instead that waste siege be understood as an ecology of matter with no place to go. Waste siege thus not only describes a stateless Palestine, but also becomes a metaphor for our besieged planet.

Roses from Kenya Labor, Environment, and the Global Trade in Cut Flowers

Roses from Kenya Labor, Environment, and the Global Trade in Cut Flowers

Author: Megan A. Styles, K. Sivaramakrishnan Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/12/2019

Kenya supplies more than 35 percent of the fresh-cut roses and other flowers sold annually in the European Union. This industry-which employs at least 90,000 workers, most of whom are women-is lucrative but enduringly controversial. More than half the flowers are grown near the shores of Lake Naivasha, a freshwater lake northwest of Nairobi recognized as a Ramsar site, a wetland of international importance. Critics decry the environmental side effects of floriculture, and human rights activists demand better wages and living conditions for workers. In this rich portrait of Kenyan floriculture, Megan Styles presents the point of view of local workers and investigates how the industry shapes Kenyan livelihoods, landscapes, and politics. She investigates the experiences and perspectives of low-wage farmworkers and the more elite actors whose lives revolve around floriculture, including farm managers and owners, Kenyan officials, and the human rights and environmental activists advocating for reform. By exploring these perspectives together, Styles reveals the complex and contradictory ways that rose farming shapes contemporary Kenya. She also shows how the rose industry connects Kenya to the world, and how Kenyan actors perceive these connections. As a key space of encounter, Lake Naivasha is a synergistic center where many actors seek to solve broader Kenyan social and environmental problems using the global flows of people, information, and money generated by floriculture.

Roses from Kenya Labor, Environment, and the Global Trade in Cut Flowers

Roses from Kenya Labor, Environment, and the Global Trade in Cut Flowers

Author: Megan A. Styles, K. Sivaramakrishnan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/12/2019

Kenya supplies more than 35 percent of the fresh-cut roses and other flowers sold annually in the European Union. This industry-which employs at least 90,000 workers, most of whom are women-is lucrative but enduringly controversial. More than half the flowers are grown near the shores of Lake Naivasha, a freshwater lake northwest of Nairobi recognized as a Ramsar site, a wetland of international importance. Critics decry the environmental side effects of floriculture, and human rights activists demand better wages and living conditions for workers. In this rich portrait of Kenyan floriculture, Megan Styles presents the point of view of local workers and investigates how the industry shapes Kenyan livelihoods, landscapes, and politics. She investigates the experiences and perspectives of low-wage farmworkers and the more elite actors whose lives revolve around floriculture, including farm managers and owners, Kenyan officials, and the human rights and environmental activists advocating for reform. By exploring these perspectives together, Styles reveals the complex and contradictory ways that rose farming shapes contemporary Kenya. She also shows how the rose industry connects Kenya to the world, and how Kenyan actors perceive these connections. As a key space of encounter, Lake Naivasha is a synergistic center where many actors seek to solve broader Kenyan social and environmental problems using the global flows of people, information, and money generated by floriculture.

Reflections on Life in Ghettos, Camps and Prisons Stuckness and Confinement

Reflections on Life in Ghettos, Camps and Prisons Stuckness and Confinement

Author: Simon (University of Copenhagen) Turner Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/12/2019

Reflections on Life in Ghettos, Camps and Prisons explores the relationship between ghettos, camps, places of detention and prisons with a focus on those people who are confined, encamped, imprisoned, detained, stuck, or forcibly removed through the lens of `stuckness'. From a point of departure in anthropology, with important contributions from criminology, geography and philosophy, the chapters explore how life is lived in and across these sites of confinement by focusing on the tactics of everyday life, while being mindful of how forms of abjection are constitutive elements of these sites. Stuckness, from this inter-disciplinary perspective, is not simply a function of the spatial form it takes; we need to understand how temporality animates stuckness as an important dimension of confinement. Death, the ultimate temporal boundary, emerges as particularly significant in this regard. With case studies from Palestine, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Northern Australia, Rwanda, Ivory Coast and Nicaragua, the contributors focus on the empirical question of how structures of stuckness, confinement and forced mobility impact on the possibilities of `making life'. Suggesting new ways of thinking about how temporality and spatiality intersect and overlap in the lives of people struggling to manage conditions of stuckness, Reflections on Life in Ghettos, Camps and Prisons will be of great interest to scholars of anthropology, geography, criminology and philosophy. The chapters in this book originally published as a special issue of Ethnos.