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Sociology: customs & traditions

See below for a selection of the latest books from Sociology: customs & traditions category. Presented with a red border are the Sociology: customs & traditions books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Sociology: customs & traditions books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The World of the Gift

The World of the Gift

Author: Jacques T. Godbout, Alain C. Caille Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/10/1998

In an age dominated by consumerism and government agencies many people believe that generosity and altruism either no longer exist or are fuelled by self-interest. Gifts are seen as, at best, irrelevant frills. In The World of the Gift Jacques Godbout and Alain Caille show that in reality the gift is all-pervasive in our society. The anthropologist Marcel Mauss, in his famous exploration of the gift in primitive and archaic societies, showed that the essential aspect of the exchange of presents involved the establishment of a social tie that bound the parties together above and beyond any material value of the objects exchanged. He argued that these intangible mutual debts constituted the social fabric. Godbout and Caille show that, contrary to the modern assumption that societies function on the basis of market exchange and the pursuit of self-interest, the gift still constitutes the foundation of our social fabric. The authors describe the gift not as an object but as a social connection, perhaps the most important social connection because it creates a sense of obligation to respond in kind. They examine the gift in a broad range of cases such as blood and organ donation; volunteer work; the bonds between friends, couples, and family; Santa Claus; the interaction between performers and their audience; and the relation of the artist to society. Written in an engaging manner, The World of the Gift will appeal to anyone who is interested in how the world really operates. Jacques T. Godbout is a research professor at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Universite du Quebec. Alain Caille is a professor at the Universite Paris X and director of the Revue du MAUSS.

The American Ritual Tapestry

The American Ritual Tapestry

Author: Mary Jo Deegan Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/09/1998

American rituals are vital to the creation and renewal of cultural meanings and rules for social interaction. These rituals are rooted in tradition yet are rapidly changing: a contradiction of hyper-modern society. This phenomenon was first explored by Professor Deegan in her 1989 study American Ritual Dramas. The theory examines both participatory rituals and mass-media rituals to show how everyday people become attached to and alienated from other rituals. Elaborating on the critical dramaturgy theory, the essays in this collection show how patterns can be changed to create a more emancipatory and celebratory society. The topics covered in the collection include an analysis of Santa Claus, skinheads, hate crimes, and strip dancing, among other topics. Each contributor has participated in these rituals and many examine related cultural artifacts such as music, brochures, and so forth. As the essays show, postmodern theory has gratly underestimated the power and coherence of these events. An important study for scholars and other researchers involved with sociological theory, social psychology, and popular culture.

International Handbook of Funeral Customs

International Handbook of Funeral Customs

Author: Kodo Matsunami Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/1998

This handbook explores the cultural and religious customs concerning death, burial, and mourning in countries throughout the world and covers all the major religions. At present there are more than 190 independent countries in the world, and the funeral practices in each are closely related to the culture, history and geography of the country concerned. Matsunami examines the ways people living around the world deal with the death of a loved one, and what kind of post-mortem arrangements are made. In doing so, he provides a better understanding of the world's cultures by viewing people's individual and collective behavior when it comes to funeral customs. Scholars of comparative religion, cultural anthropology, sociology, and even funeral directors, will value this comprehensive reference.

Selling Tradition

Selling Tradition

Author: Jane S. Becker Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/1998

The first half of the twentieth century witnessed a growing interest in America's folk heritage, as Americans began to enthusiastically collect, present, market, and consume the nation's folk traditions. Examining one of this century's most prominent folk revivals --the reemergence of Southern Appalachian handicraft traditions in the 1930s--Jane Becker unravels the cultural politics that bound together a complex network of producers, reformers, government officials, industries, museums, urban markets, and consumers, all of whom helped to redefine Appalachian craft production in the context of a national cultural identity. Becker uses this craft revival as a way of exploring the construction of the cultural categories folk and tradition. She also addresses the consequences such labels have had on the people to whom they have been assigned. Though the revival of domestic arts in the Southern Appalachians reflected an attempt to aid the people of an impoverished region, she says, as well as a desire to recapture an important part of the nation's folk heritage, in reality the new craft production owed less to tradition than to middle-class tastes and consumer culture--forces that obscured the techniques used by mountain laborers and the conditions in which they worked. |Examines the reemergence of Southern Appalachian handicraft traditions in the late 1930s, discussing the cultural politics involved in adapting tradition to the needs of consumer culture.

Bulgarian Folk Customs

Bulgarian Folk Customs

Author: Mercia MacDermott Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/06/1998

This comprehensive exploration of Bulgarian traditions, beliefs and lifestyles provides a wealth of information available for the first time in English, in one volume. Folk customs sustain a community and promote the welfare of the individual within it, and in Bulgarian these customs have for centuries fulfilled many social and personal needs, strengthening the family, comforting the bereaved, educating and celebrating. Part One includes an introductory overview of Bulgarian history and looks at the background to traditional Bulgarian society, costumes, music and dance. Part Two and Three detail the various festivals and customs that are related to almost every aspect of Bulgarian life, dividing them into two groups: customs relating to the family and individual, and calendar customs and festivals. The book includes general information on human behaviour and beliefs, as well as more specialized information on subjects such as the ritual use of plants or the significance of, for example, the colour red. It will be a valuable source of reference for anthropologists, ethnographers and historians.

A Hut of One's Own

A Hut of One's Own

Author: Ann Cline Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/04/1998

An exploration of the smallest and simplest of dwellings offers answers to some of the largest and oldest questions about architecture. This small book on small dwellings explores some of the largest questions that can be posed about architecture. What begins where architecture ends? What was before architecture? The ostensible subject of Ann Cline's inquiry is the primitive hut, a one-room structure built of common or rustic materials. Does the proliferation of these structures in recent times represent escapist architectural fantasy, or deeper cultural impulses? As she addresses this question, Cline gracefully weaves together two stories: one of primitive huts in times of cultural transition, and the other of diminutive structures in our own time of architectural transition. From these narrative strands emerges a deeper inquiry: what are the limits of architecture? What ghosts inhabit its edges? What does it mean to dwell outside it? Cline's project began twenty-five years ago, when she set out to translate the Japanese tea ritual into an American idiom. First researching the traditional tea practices of Japan, then building and designing huts in the United States, she attempted to make the translation from one culture to another through the use of common American building materials and technology. But her investigation eventually led her to look at many nonarchitectural ideas and sources, for the hut exists both at the beginning of and at the farthest edge of architecture, in the margins between what architecture is and what it is not. In the resulting narrative, she blends autobiography, historical research, and cultural criticism to consider the place that such structures as shacks, teahouses, follies, casitas, and diners-simple, undesigned places valued for their timelessness and authenticity-occupy from both a historical and contemporary perspective. This book is an original and imaginative attempt to rethink architecture by studying its boundary conditions and formative structures.

Blue Ridge Folklife

Blue Ridge Folklife

Author: Ted Olson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/02/1998

In the years immediately preceding the founding of the American nation the Blue Ridge region, which stretches through large sections of Virginia and North Carolina and parts of surrounding states along the Appalachian chain, was the American frontier. In colonial times, it was settled by hardy, independent people from several cultural backgrounds that did not fit with the English-dominated society. The landless, the restless, and the rootless followed Daniel Boone, the most famous of the settlers, and pushed the frontier westward. The settlers who did not migrate to new lands became geographically isolated and politically and economically marginalized. Yet they created fulfilling lives for themselves by forging effective and oftentimes sophisticated folklife traditions, many of which endure in the region today. In 1772 the Blue Ridge was the site of the Watauga Association, often cited as the first free and democratic non-native government on the American continent. In 1780 Blue Ridge pioneers helped win the Revolutionary War for the patriots by defeating Patrick Ferguson's army of British loyalists at the Battle of Kings Mountain. When gold was discovered in the southernmost section of the Blue Ridge, America experienced its first gold rush and the subsequent tragic displacement of the region's aboriginal people. Having been spared by the coincidence of geology and topography from the more environmentally damaging manifestations of industrialization, coal mining, and dam building, the Blue Ridge region still harbors scenic natural beauty as well as vestiges of the earliest cultures of southern Appalachia. As it describes the most characteristic and significant verbal, customary, and material traditions, this fascinating, fact-filled book traces the historical development of the region's distinct folklife. Ted Olson is a college instructor, folklorist, freelance writer, and former Blue Ridge Parkway ranger.

Blue Ridge Folklife

Blue Ridge Folklife

Author: Ted Olson Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/1998

In the years immediately preceding the founding of the American nation the Blue Ridge region, which stretches through large sections of Virginia and North Carolina and parts of surrounding states along the Appalachian chain, was the American frontier. In colonial times, it was settled by hardy, independent people from several cultural backgrounds that did not fit with the English-dominated society. The landless, the restless, and the rootless followed Daniel Boone, the most famous of the settlers, and pushed the frontier westward. The settlers who did not migrate to new lands became geographically isolated and politically and economically marginalized. Yet they created fulfilling lives for themselves by forging effective and oftentimes sophisticated folklife traditions, many of which endure in the region today. In 1772 the Blue Ridge was the site of the Watauga Association, often cited as the first free and democratic non-native government on the American continent. In 1780 Blue Ridge pioneers helped win the Revolutionary War for the patriots by defeating Patrick Ferguson's army of British loyalists at the Battle of Kings Mountain. When gold was discovered in the southernmost section of the Blue Ridge, America experienced its first gold rush and the subsequent tragic displacement of the region's aboriginal people. Having been spared by the coincidence of geology and topography from the more environmentally damaging manifestations of industrialization, coal mining, and dam building, the Blue Ridge region still harbors scenic natural beauty as well as vestiges of the earliest cultures of southern Appalachia. As it describes the most characteristic and significant verbal, customary, and material traditions, this fascinating, fact-filled book traces the historical development of the region's distinct folklife. Ted Olson is a college instructor, folklorist, freelance writer, and former Blue Ridge Parkway ranger.

Day Kadi Lost Part of Her Life

Day Kadi Lost Part of Her Life

Author: Kim Manresa, Isabel Ramos Rioja Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/1998

La Fiesta de los Tastoanes

La Fiesta de los Tastoanes

Author: Olga Najera-Ramirez Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/1997

Each year, for three days in September, the citizens of Jocotan, an ancient indigenous community near Guadalajara, Mexico, symbolically reenact the Spanish conquest of Mexico in mock battles between Santiago, the patron saint of Spain, and the Tastoanes, the leaders of the indigenous resistance. Paradoxically, the Jocotenos honor Santiago, their special protector, and incorporate both Christian and indigenous practices and beliefs in their fiesta. Employing the concept of hegemony, the author explores what the festival means culturally to the community and shows how it enables Jocotenos to adapt to Christianity and to resist the social order it symbolizes. Through the festival, Jocotenos address their collective identity, the preservation of their folk culture, and their relationship to the social-political power structure of Jocotan. Students of Mexican culture and of syncretic religions worldwide will find this study stimulating and informative.

Haunted House Halloween Book

Haunted House Halloween Book

Author: Jerry R. Chavez Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/1997

Every October, schools, civic clubs, scout troops, little leagues and charity groups of all kinds sponsor Halloween haunted houses as fundraisers. But where do they go for good information on how to do it? How to make the rotting corpse that scares the bejeebers out of everyone or the demonic knife-wielding doll or the living, beating heart that visitors swear is real? And what about the mundane details (e.g., permits and insurance) that make the haunted house a profitable and safe venture? Where does one find out about that? All aspects of the successful haunted house are covered here. There is good information on site selection, logistics, design, security, budgeting, sponsorship and volunteer management. This is followed by detailed, descriptions of many inexpensive illusions for your haunted house; each is accompanied by illustrations that further explain how to make the effect successful. Floor plans, advertising flyers and design worksheets are some of the sample materials included.

The Theatre of Death - The Ritual Management of Royal Funerals in Renaissance England, 1570-1625

The Theatre of Death - The Ritual Management of Royal Funerals in Renaissance England, 1570-1625

Author: Jennifer Woodward Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/11/1997

This book represents the first detailed study into English royal funeral ceremonies of the period, building on earlier scholarship dealing with the French royal funeral and with the social history of death and burial in early modern England. Funeral rituals are approached as performances, and placed in their political, religious and broader cultural contexts, showing them to be a microcosm of cultural change. The impact of the Reformation, with its strong iconophobic strain, on a ritual process which was centred on the display of a life-sized image of the dead monarch, is explored. Later, the counter influence of the Arminianism and Continental art is considered in relation to the apotheosis of the theatre of death under the early Stuarts, with particular reference to the funeral of James I. Earlier individual funeral occasions are also addressed, with varied focus. The author shows how the obsequies of Elizabeth I were used to help establish the new Stuart dynasty; the sudden death of the young Henry Stuart, heir to the throne, led to a funeral quite different in atmosphere and political purpose. The death rituals of Mary, Queen of Scots (both the ceremonies staged in the wake of her execution, and the monuments and funeral performances created years later by her son, James) are analysed in depth: the emergent picture of the deliberate manipulation of the Scottish Queen's posthumous image provides a fascinating insight into the relationship between power and ritual at the renaissance court. Dr JENNIFER WOODWARD gained her Ph.D. from the University of Warwick. __________________