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Sociology: family & relationships

See below for a selection of the latest books from Sociology: family & relationships category. Presented with a red border are the Sociology: family & relationships books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Sociology: family & relationships books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Mothers of Incest Survivors

Mothers of Incest Survivors

Author: Janis Tyler Johnson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/11/1992

. . . an intellectually stimulating discussion of important theories and an enthrallingly personal reading experience. -Elizabeth L. Navarre\ . . . the one book we've been waiting for. . . . The book succeeds admirably in exploring six women's stories with a great deal of respect. -Changes: An International Journal of Psychology and Psychotherapy . . . poignant revelations . . . Johnson is able to paint an individualized portrait of each woman and avoids twisting their stories to fit some theory. -Publishers Weekly . . . a gritty glimpse of a painful struggle, and a framework for rethinking our perspectives and prejudices. -The Women's Review of Books Janis Tyler Johnson has collected the stories of six mothers who relate, in their own words, their experiences as mothers of incest victims. Their accounts challenge the collusive, mother-blaming theory of incest families. Mothers tell how they discovered the incest secret, the ways they responded, and the meanings that incest held for themselves, their daughters, husbands, and families.

Cruelty and Companionship

Cruelty and Companionship

Author: A. James Hammerton Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/11/1992

Cruelty and Companionship is an account of the intimate but darker sides of marriage in Victorian and Edwardian England. Hammerton draws upon previously unpublished material from the records of the divorce court and magistrates' courts to challenge many popular views about changing family patterns. His findings open a rare window onto the sexual politics of everyday life and the routine tensions which conditioned marriage in middle and working class families. Using contemporary evidence ranging from prescriptive texts and public debate to autobiography and fiction, Hammerton examines the intense public scrutiny which accompanied the routine exposure of marital breakdown, and charts a growing critique of men's behaviour in marriage which increasingly demanded regulation and reform. The critical discourse which resulted, ranging from paternalist to feminist, casts new light on the origins and trajectory of nineteenth century feminism, legal change and our understanding of the changing expression of masculinity.

The New American Grandparent

The New American Grandparent

Author: Andrew J. Cherlin, Frank Furstenberg Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/11/1992

Family, Self, and Society

Family, Self, and Society

Author: Philip A. Cowan Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/11/1992

Any agenda for family research in the 1990s must take seriously a contextual approach to the study of family relationships. The editors and contributors to this volume believe that the richness in family studies over the next decade will come from considering the diversity of family forms -- different ethnic groups and cultures, different stages of family life, as well as different historical cohorts. Their goal is to make more explicit how we think about families in order to study them and understand them. To illustrate the need for diversity in family studies, examples are presented from new and old families, majority and minority families, American and Japanese families, and intact and divorcing families. This variety is intended to push the limits of current thinking, not only for researchers but also for all who are struggling to live with and work with families in a time when family life is valued but fragmented and relatively unsupported by society's institutions. Students and researchers interested in family development from the viewpoint of any of the social sciences will find this book of value.

Trauma-Organized Systems

Trauma-Organized Systems

Author: Arnon Bentovim Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/11/1992

This book is about the experience of individuals who have been abused or who have abused others, but it also traces the way an abusive experience can organize a family or professional system so that changes are difficult to achieve. The author has been in the forefront of the child abuse field for many years, and he discusses in this volume the way his thinking has changed to incorporate the ideas from the feminist movement and the constructionist family therapists. He looks at the way victimizing actions and the traumatic effects of abuse combine to create a trauma-organized system, which includes the individual, the family, the professional helpers, the community, and the cultural values. The author describes the characteristics of these systems and a diagnostic procedure to help the workers plan the treatment.

Contemporary Families

Contemporary Families

Author: Mary E. Procidano Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/1992

Recent studies have shown that as many as a third of all school children show some signs of school dysfunction, and an increasing body of evidence strongly indicates that aspects of family life are basic determinants of children's school adjustment. In Contemporary Families: A Handbook for School Professionals , 21 contributors examine the changing nature of American families, discuss the relationship of home life to school and the critical role of familial experiences, and develop and recommend interventions. In Part 1, family configurations are discussed - dual wage, single-parent, and step-families. Such families have become far more prevalent in recent years, and are more vulnerable to other social strains. The authors of Part II examine the dimension of ethnic and cultural diversity. Hispanic, African-American, and Korean families are considered, the ways in which cultural behaviours influence school-related behaviours, the effects of language socialisation and discrimination. Parts III and IV examine families facing the highly stressful situations of poverty, death and divorce, and the long-term stressors of learning disability, chronic illness and psychological disturbances in both children and parents. Part V is devoted to varying personal and social resources among families. Contemporary Families attempts to provide a theoretical framework from which school professionals can develop an understanding of each child's unique family circumstances on school adaptation, and from there begin to take remedial steps. Truancy, drug and alcohol abuse, fighting, illiteracy, school phobia, low academic performance, dropping out - Contemporary Families aims to show how preventive efforts directed toward the family can stem these maladaptions before they reach critical levels in children.

The Minimal Family

The Minimal Family

Author: Jan E. Dizard, Howard Gadlin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/10/1992

The Minimal Family arose from an argument that began between the two authors over fifteen years ago. While both agreed that the family was being steadily weakened, principally by the ways the economy erodes family solidarity, they disagreed about the significance of the change. Neither people's private lives nor the state will ever be fully satisfactory or adequately responsive to the full range of individual and collective needs, if only because these needs will invariable change over time. As a result, we can expect continued, albeit intermittent, conflict and flux as people strive to forge decent lives for themselves.

Negotiating Family Responsibilities

Negotiating Family Responsibilities

Author: Jennifer Mason, Professor Janet V. Finch Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/10/1992

Negotiating Family Responsibilities provides a major new insight into contemporary family life, particularly kin relationships outside the nuclear family. While many people believe that the real meaning of 'family' has shrunk to the nuclear family household, there is considerable evidence to suggest that relationships with the wider kin group remain an important part of most people's lives. Based on the findings of a major study of kinship, and including lively verbatim accounts of conversations with family members concepts of responsibility and obligation within family life are examined and the authors expand theories on the nature of assistance within families and argue that it is negotiated over time rather than given automatically.

Divorce

Divorce

Author: David A. Chiriboga Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/1992

Not since William Goode's Women in Divorce in the 1950's have we had such a comprehensive study of adjustment to divorce. This longitudinal work views divorce as a transition process which may have positive or negative outcomes over time. In addition to statistical analysis, the book includes very interesting case studies to demonstrate the dynamic events occurring as individuals refashion their lives after the breakup of their marriages. Researchers on divorce and the interested public will find this book very valuable for years to come. Colleen L. Johnson, Ph.D.Professor Medical Anthropology, University of California, San Francisco We are witnessing a steady increase in the overall number of older adults who are divorced, yet the majority of divorce research has concerned itself with persons in the younger adult years. This unique, groundbreaking book addresses the critical need for information on the impact of divorce on individuals in all age groups, and pays special attention to age as a factor in the effects of divorce on both men and women. Written by an interdisciplinary team of social and behavioral scientists, Divorce: Crisis, Challenge or Relief? provides the invaluable results gained from their life span study of divorced adults. Divorce is the product of hundreds of interviews containing a host of very specific questions conducted with divorced adults between the ages of 20 and 79, both just after their divorce and again several years later.

Fathers Who Fail

Fathers Who Fail

Author: Melvin R. Lansky Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/10/1992

Despite the burgeoning literature on the role of the father in child development and on fathering as a developmental stage, surprisingly little has been written about the psychiatrically impaired father. In Fathers Who Fail, Melvin Lansky remedies this glaring lacuna in the literature. Drawing on contemporary psychoanalysis, family systems theory, and the sociology of conflict, he delineates the spectrum of psychopathological predicaments that undermine the ability of the father to be a father. Out of his sensitive integration of the intrapsychic and intrafamilial contexts of paternal failure emerges a richly textured portrait of psychiatrically impaired fathers, of fathers who fail. Lansky's probing discussion of narcissistic equilibrium in the family system enables him to chart the natural history common to the symptomatic impulsive actions of impaired fathers. He then considers specific manifestations of paternal dysfunction within this shared framework of heightened familial conflict and the failure of intrafamilial defenses to common shame. Domestic violence, suicide, the intensification of trauma, posttraumatic nightmares, catastrophic reactions in organic brain syndrome, and the murder of a spouse are among the major symptoms that he explores. In each instance, Lansky carefully sketches the progression of vulnerability and turbulence from the father's personality, to the family system, and thence to the symptomatic eruption in question. In his concluding chapter, he comments tellingly on the unconscious obstacles - on the part of both patients and therapists - to treating impaired fathers. The obstacles cut across different clinical modalities, underscoring the need for multimodal responses to fathers who fail.

Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America

Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America

Author: Asuncion Lavrin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/1992

This fascinating book presents the work of nine social historians who seek to reconstruct the elusive and highly personal private lives of colonial Latin Americans. The essays analyze a range of issues from sexuality marriage, divorce, and illegitimacy to sexual witch-craft, conceptions of sin, and confession...Uniformly engaging, provocative, and well-written, these essays represent some of the most interesting contemporary work on colonial Latin American society' - Hispanic American Historical Review .'A very welcome contribution to the study of the hitherto little explored personal dimensions of the formation and reproduction of colonial society. The essays uncover a rich set of illuminating but until now largely neglected archival sources, throwing light not only on the shifting sexual politics of church and state, the evolution of sexual constraints, and the contradictions between institutional norms and individual practice but also on the private, personal aspects of relations between the sexes with special attention to the experience of women' - Journal of the History of Sexuality .' Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America presents the best work on the subject so far' - The Village Voice . Asuncion Lavrin is a professor of history at Arizona State University at Tempe. Her 1995 book, Women, Feminism, and Social Change in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay, 189-194 , won the Arthur P. Whitaker Prize from the Middle Atlantic Council on Latin American Studies.

Distant Parents

Distant Parents

Author: Jacob J. Climo Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/1992

Jacob Climo writes about the relationship between adult children and their parents, when they live at a distance from each other. In the United States today, twenty million adult children live too far from their parents for frequent face-to-face contacts. Despite geographical separation, most of these children and their parents maintain intense family feelings and make great efforts to keep in touch. Until now, gerontologists and social scientists have ignored distant parent-child relationships. Climo focuses attention on the special problems of distant relationships by looking at the efforts of forty university professors, men and women, to maintain bonds with their parents, to provide assistance, and to communicate through visits and phone calls. The adult children he interviewed live at least 200 miles from their parents. In most ways they are similar to the millions of other professionals whose careers have led them to move away from their parents. We hear their voices, as they speak frankly about the advantages, pains, and challenges of separation. Climo considers distant relationships to be different from other relationships and to be a growing social problem. Distant living complicates communications by shaping and restricting both phone calls and visits. His description of the typical phone call and typical seasonal visit, with their patterns and limitations, will sound familiar to many of us. In addition to affecting communications, distance affects memories of past parent-child relationships in ways that influence present relationships. Memories, which take on great weight, tend to determine current behavior. Most seriously, distance limits the kinds of assistance children can provide when their parents become ill, resulting in frustration, anger, guilt, and a sense of powerlessness. Climo urges us to be more aware of distant living as a growing social problem. The percentage of children who move away from their parents will continue to increase. Once adult children acknowledge the challenges distance creates, they can learn to develop better communications and to deal with their feelings of ambivalence.