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Sociology: family & relationships

See below for a selection of the latest books from Sociology: family & relationships category. Presented with a red border are the Sociology: family & relationships books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Sociology: family & relationships books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Home Care Fault Lines Understanding Tensions and Creating Alliances

Home Care Fault Lines Understanding Tensions and Creating Alliances

Author: Cynthia J. Cranford Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/06/2020

In this revealing look at home care, Cynthia J. Cranford illustrates how elderly and disabled people and the immigrant women workers who assist them in daily activities develop meaningful relationships even when their different ages, abilities, races, nationalities, and socioeconomic backgrounds generate tension. As Cranford shows, workers can experience devaluation within racialized and gendered class hierarchies, which shapes their pursuit of security. Cranford analyzes the tensions, alliances, and compromises between security for workers and flexibility for elderly and disabled people, and she argues that workers and recipients negotiate flexibility and security within intersecting inequalities in varying ways depending on multiple interacting dynamics. What comes through from Cranford's analysis is the need for deeply democratic alliances across multiple axes of inequality. To support both flexible care and secure work, she argues for an intimate community unionism that advocates for universal state funding, designs culturally sensitive labor market intermediaries run by workers and recipients to help people find jobs or workers, and addresses everyday tensions in home workplaces.

Home Care Fault Lines Understanding Tensions and Creating Alliances

Home Care Fault Lines Understanding Tensions and Creating Alliances

Author: Cynthia J. Cranford Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/06/2020

In this revealing look at home care, Cynthia J. Cranford illustrates how elderly and disabled people and the immigrant women workers who assist them in daily activities develop meaningful relationships even when their different ages, abilities, races, nationalities, and socioeconomic backgrounds generate tension. As Cranford shows, workers can experience devaluation within racialized and gendered class hierarchies, which shapes their pursuit of security. Cranford analyzes the tensions, alliances, and compromises between security for workers and flexibility for elderly and disabled people, and she argues that workers and recipients negotiate flexibility and security within intersecting inequalities in varying ways depending on multiple interacting dynamics. What comes through from Cranford's analysis is the need for deeply democratic alliances across multiple axes of inequality. To support both flexible care and secure work, she argues for an intimate community unionism that advocates for universal state funding, designs culturally sensitive labor market intermediaries run by workers and recipients to help people find jobs or workers, and addresses everyday tensions in home workplaces.

Love Across Borders Asian Americans and the Politics of Intermarriage and Family-Making

Love Across Borders Asian Americans and the Politics of Intermarriage and Family-Making

Author: Kelly H. (University of Kansas, USA) Chong Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/06/2020

High rates of intermarriage, especially with whites, have been viewed as an indicator that Asian-Americans are successfully assimilating, signaling acceptance by the white majority and their own desire to become part of the white mainstream. Comparing two types of Asian-American intermarriage, interracial and interethnic, Kelly H. Chong disrupts these assumptions by showing that both types of intermarriages, in differing ways, are sites of complex struggles around racial/ethnic identity and cultural formations that reveal the salience of race in the lives of Asian-Americans. Drawing upon extensive qualitative data, Chong explores how interracial marriages, far from being an endpoint of assimilation, are a terrain of life-long negotiations over racial and ethnic identities, while interethnic (intra-Asian) unions and family-making illuminate Asian-Americans' ongoing efforts to co-construct and sustain a common racial identity and panethnic culture despite interethnic differences and tensions. Chong also examines the pivotal role race and gender play in shaping both the romantic desires and desirability of Asian-Americans, spotlighting the social construction of love and marital choices. Through the lens of intermarriage, Love Across Borders offers critical insights into the often invisible racial struggles of this racially in-between model minority group -- particularly its ambivalent negotiations with whiteness and white privilege -- and on the group's social incorporation process and its implications for the redrawing of color boundaries in the U.S.

Love Across Borders Asian Americans and the Politics of Intermarriage and Family-Making

Love Across Borders Asian Americans and the Politics of Intermarriage and Family-Making

Author: Kelly H. (University of Kansas, USA) Chong Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/06/2020

High rates of intermarriage, especially with whites, have been viewed as an indicator that Asian-Americans are successfully assimilating, signaling acceptance by the white majority and their own desire to become part of the white mainstream. Comparing two types of Asian-American intermarriage, interracial and interethnic, Kelly H. Chong disrupts these assumptions by showing that both types of intermarriages, in differing ways, are sites of complex struggles around racial/ethnic identity and cultural formations that reveal the salience of race in the lives of Asian-Americans. Drawing upon extensive qualitative data, Chong explores how interracial marriages, far from being an endpoint of assimilation, are a terrain of life-long negotiations over racial and ethnic identities, while interethnic (intra-Asian) unions and family-making illuminate Asian-Americans' ongoing efforts to co-construct and sustain a common racial identity and panethnic culture despite interethnic differences and tensions. Chong also examines the pivotal role race and gender play in shaping both the romantic desires and desirability of Asian-Americans, spotlighting the social construction of love and marital choices. Through the lens of intermarriage, Love Across Borders offers critical insights into the often invisible racial struggles of this racially in-between model minority group -- particularly its ambivalent negotiations with whiteness and white privilege -- and on the group's social incorporation process and its implications for the redrawing of color boundaries in the U.S.

Making Motherhood Work How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving

Making Motherhood Work How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving

Author: Caitlyn Collins Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/06/2020

A moving account of working mothers' daily lives-and the revolution in public policy and culture needed to improve them The work-family conflict that mothers experience today is a national crisis. Women struggle to balance breadwinning with the bulk of parenting, and social policies aren't helping. Of all Western industrialized countries, the United States ranks dead last for supportive work-family policies. Can American women look to Europe for solutions? Making Motherhood Work draws on interviews that Caitlyn Collins conducted over five years with 135 middle-class working mothers in Sweden, Germany, Italy, and the United States. She explores how women navigate work and family given the different policy supports available in each country. Taking readers into women's homes, neighborhoods, and workplaces, Collins shows that mothers' expectations depend on context and that policies alone cannot solve women's struggles. With women held to unrealistic standards, the best solutions demand that we redefine motherhood, work, and family. This edition includes discussion questions for reading groups.

Stating the Family New Directions in the Study of American Politics

Stating the Family New Directions in the Study of American Politics

Author: Julie Novkov Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/05/2020

Glance at a political party's platform, catch a politician's speech, sample the news, and you will find the family-not as a mere group of people living together in the private sphere, but as a contentious entity at the center of political disputes and policy debates over everything from marriage equality and gender identity to immigration and welfare reform. The key role of the family in politics and public policy, so often relegated to the outer margins of political science and theory, comes in for long overdue consideration in this volume. Bringing together political scientists and legal scholars of wide-ranging interests and perspectives, Stating the Family explores the role of the family in American political development: as a focus of political struggle, a place where policy happens, a means of distributing governmental goods, and a way of relating individuals to the state and to each other in legal terms. While the authors gathered here examine important policy questions that relate to the family - including immigration, welfare, citizenship, partisanship, and ideology - they pay particular attention to changes in family structures and responsibilities in light of the rise of neoliberalism. Illustrated with case studies - some contemporary, some historical - their essays provide individual takes on different links between family and politics, creating a nuanced conversation on this complex topic. The result is a multifaceted view of the family's place in the development of American political institutions and a unique understanding of the work that family does to structure politics - and that politics does to structure families.

Stating the Family New Directions in the Study of American Politics

Stating the Family New Directions in the Study of American Politics

Author: Julie Novkov Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/05/2020

Glance at a political party's platform, catch a politician's speech, sample the news, and you will find the family - not as a mere group of people living together in the private sphere, but as a contentious entity at the center of political disputes and policy debates over everything from marriage equality and gender identity to immigration and welfare reform. The key role of the family in politics and public policy, so often relegated to the outer margins of political science and theory, comes in for long overdue consideration in this volume. Bringing together political scientists and legal scholars of wide-ranging interests and perspectives, Stating the Family explores the role of the family in American political development: as a focus of political struggle, a place where policy happens, a means of distributing governmental goods, and a way of relating individuals to the state and to each other in legal terms. While the authors gathered here examine important policy questions that relate to the family - including immigration, welfare, citizenship, partisanship, and ideology - they pay particular attention to changes in family structures and responsibilities in light of the rise of neoliberalism. Illustrated with case studies - some contemporary, some historical - their essays provide individual takes on different links between family and politics, creating a nuanced conversation on this complex topic. The result is a multifaceted view of the family's place in the development of American political institutions and a unique understanding of the work that family does to structure politics - and that politics does to structure families.

Survey of African Marriage and Family Life

Survey of African Marriage and Family Life

Author: Arthur Phillips Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/05/2020

Originally published in 1953, this study examines the effect of social change on African domestic organization and marriage. Changes to African social organization due to increased contact with the West are analyzed and accounts given as to how these changes were handled by various administrations and missionaries. The volume is contributed to by lawyers, missionaries, anthropologists and sociologists from Africa, Europe and the USA.

Divorce in South Korea Doing Gender and the Dynamics of Relationship Breakdown

Divorce in South Korea Doing Gender and the Dynamics of Relationship Breakdown

Author: Yean-Ju Lee Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2020

It may sound logical that individualistic attitudes boost divorce. This book argues otherwise. Conservative norms of specialized gender roles serve as the root cause of marital dissolution. Those expectations that prescribe what men should do and what women should do help break down marital relationships. Data from South Korea suggest that lingering norms of gendered roles can threaten married persons' self-identity and hence their marriages during the period of rapid structural changes. The existing literature predicting divorce does not conceptually distinguish between the process of relationship breakdown and the act of ending a marriage, implicitly but heavily focusing on the latter while obscuring the former. In contemporary societies, however, the social and economic cost of divorce is sufficiently low, i.e., stigma against divorce is minimal and economic survival after divorce is a nonissue, and leaving a marriage is no longer dictated by one's being liberal or conservative or any particular characteristics. Thus, the right question to ask is not who leaves a marriage but why a marriage goes sour to begin with. Practically no previous study on divorce has exclusively theorized the process of relationship breakdown. Not conceptually separating the act of leaving a marriage, previous studies addressing the risk factors of divorce have been rather ambiguous about how marital relationships deteriorate enough to result in dissolution. In Korea, a majority of divorces occur through mutual consent of the two spouses without any court procedure, but when one spouse files for divorce, the fault-based divorce litigation rules require the court to lay out the entire chronicle of relevant events occurring up to the legal action, often with the help of court investigators. As such, court rulings provide glimpses into the entire marital dynamics, including verbatim exchanges between the spouses. Lee argues that the typical process of relationship breakdown is related to married persons' daily practices of verifying their gendered role identity.

The Third Job Employed Couples' Management of Household Work Contradictions

The Third Job Employed Couples' Management of Household Work Contradictions

Author: Gurjeet K. Gill Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/04/2020

Published in 1998. This text focuses on three-job (two paid and one unpaid housework job) families. It investigates the way in which partners experience and handle the contradictions in the daily running of the household - contradictions which result from the conflicting features within and between society and the family. An equal division of household labour remains at the heart of these contradictions as women take on the responsibility of running the family home in addition to paid employment.