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Social classes

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social classes category. Presented with a red border are the Social classes books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social classes books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Remaking a Life How Women Living with HIV/AIDS Confront Inequality

Remaking a Life How Women Living with HIV/AIDS Confront Inequality

Author: Celeste Watkins-Hayes Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2019

In the face of life-threatening news, how does our view of life change-and what do we do it transform it? Remaking a Life uses the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a lens to understand how women generate radical improvements in their social well being in the face of social stigma and economic disadvantage. Drawing on interviews with nationally recognized AIDS activists as well as over one hundred Chicago-based women living with HIV/AIDS, Celeste Watkins-Hayes takes readers on an uplifting journey through women's transformative projects, a multidimensional process in which women shift their approach to their physical, social, economic, and political survival, thereby changing their viewpoint of dying from AIDS to living with it. With an eye towards improving the lives of women, Remaking a Life provides techniques to encourage private, nonprofit, and government agencies to successfully collaborate, and shares policy ideas with the hope of alleviating the injuries of inequality faced by those living with HIV/AIDS everyday.

Remaking a Life How Women Living with HIV/AIDS Confront Inequality

Remaking a Life How Women Living with HIV/AIDS Confront Inequality

Author: Celeste Watkins-Hayes Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/2019

In the face of life-threatening news, how does our view of life change-and what do we do it transform it? Remaking a Life uses the HIV/AIDS epidemic as a lens to understand how women generate radical improvements in their social well being in the face of social stigma and economic disadvantage. Drawing on interviews with nationally recognized AIDS activists as well as over one hundred Chicago-based women living with HIV/AIDS, Celeste Watkins-Hayes takes readers on an uplifting journey through women's transformative projects, a multidimensional process in which women shift their approach to their physical, social, economic, and political survival, thereby changing their viewpoint of dying from AIDS to living with it. With an eye towards improving the lives of women, Remaking a Life provides techniques to encourage private, nonprofit, and government agencies to successfully collaborate, and shares policy ideas with the hope of alleviating the injuries of inequality faced by those living with HIV/AIDS everyday.

Reformed American Dreams Welfare Mothers, Higher Education, and Activism

Reformed American Dreams Welfare Mothers, Higher Education, and Activism

Author: Sheila M. Katz Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/2019

Reformed American Dreams explores the experiences of low-income single mothers who pursued higher education while on welfare after the 1996 welfare reforms. This research occurred in an area where grassroots activism by and for mothers on welfare in higher education was directly able to affect the implementation of public policy. Half of the participants in Sheila M. Katz's research were activists with the grassroots welfare rights organization, LIFETIME, trying to change welfare policy and to advocate for better access to higher education. Reformed American Dreams takes up their struggle to raise families, attend school, and become student activists, all while trying to escape poverty. Katz highlights mothers' experiences as they pursued higher education on welfare and became grassroots activists during the Great Recession.

Inequality and the 1%

Inequality and the 1%

Author: Danny Dorling Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/08/2019

Since the Great Recession hit in 2008, the 1% has only grown richer while the rest find life increasingly tough. The gap between the haves and the have-nots has turned into a chasm. While the rich have found new ways of protecting their wealth, everyone else has suffered the penalties of austerity. But inequality is more than just economics. Being born outside the 1% has a dramatic impact on a person's potential: reducing life expectancy, limiting educational and work prospects, and even affecting mental health. What is to be done? In Inequality and the 1% leading social thinker Danny Dorling lays bare the extent and true cost of the division in our society and asks what have the super-rich ever done for us? He shows that it is the 1% that threatens us with the most harm and why we must urgently redress the balance

The Conspiracy of Capital Law, Violence, and American Popular Radicalism in the Age of Monopoly

The Conspiracy of Capital Law, Violence, and American Popular Radicalism in the Age of Monopoly

Author: Michael Mark Cohen Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/07/2019

Between the 1880s and 1920s, a broad coalition of American dissidents, which included rabble-rousing cartoonists, civil liberties lawyers, socialist detectives, union organizers, and revolutionary martyrs, forged a culture of popular radicalism that directly challenged an emergent corporate capitalism. Monopoly capitalists and their allies in government responded by expanding conspiracy laws and promoting conspiracy theories in an effort to destroy this anti-capitalist movement. The result was an escalating class conflict in which each side came to view the other as a criminal conspiracy. In this detailed cultural history, Michael Mark Cohen argues that a legal, ideological, and representational politics of conspiracy contributed to the formation of a genuinely revolutionary mass culture in the United States, starting with the 1886 Haymarket bombing. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, The Conspiracy of Capital offers a new history of American radicalism and the alliance between the modern business corporation and national security state through a comprehensive reassessment of the role of conspiracy laws and conspiracy theories in American social movements.

The Conspiracy of Capital Law, Violence, and American Popular Radicalism in the Age of Monopoly

The Conspiracy of Capital Law, Violence, and American Popular Radicalism in the Age of Monopoly

Author: Michael Mark Cohen Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2019

Between the 1880s and 1920s, a broad coalition of American dissidents, which included rabble-rousing cartoonists, civil liberties lawyers, socialist detectives, union organizers, and revolutionary martyrs, forged a culture of popular radicalism that directly challenged an emergent corporate capitalism. Monopoly capitalists and their allies in government responded by expanding conspiracy laws and promoting conspiracy theories in an effort to destroy this anti-capitalist movement. The result was an escalating class conflict in which each side came to view the other as a criminal conspiracy. In this detailed cultural history, Michael Mark Cohen argues that a legal, ideological, and representational politics of conspiracy contributed to the formation of a genuinely revolutionary mass culture in the United States, starting with the 1886 Haymarket bombing. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, The Conspiracy of Capital offers a new history of American radicalism and the alliance between the modern business corporation and national security state through a comprehensive reassessment of the role of conspiracy laws and conspiracy theories in American social movements.

Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

Author: Dennis Gilbert Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/07/2019

Flatlining Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

Flatlining Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

Author: Adia Harvey Wingfield Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/07/2019

What happens to black health care professionals in the new economy, where work is insecure and organizational resources are scarce? In Flatlining, Adia Harvey Wingfield exposes how hospitals, clinics, and other institutions participate in racial outsourcing, relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians, and physician assistants to do equity work -extra labor that makes organizations and their services more accessible to communities of color. Wingfield argues that as these organizations become more profit driven, they come to depend on black health care professionals to perform equity work to serve increasingly diverse constituencies. Yet black workers often do this labor without recognition, compensation, or support. Operating at the intersection of work, race, gender, and class, Wingfield makes plain the challenges that black employees must overcome and reveals the complicated issues of inequality in today's workplaces and communities.

Flatlining Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

Flatlining Race, Work, and Health Care in the New Economy

Author: Adia Harvey Wingfield Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/07/2019

What happens to black health care professionals in the new economy, where work is insecure and organizational resources are scarce? In Flatlining, Adia Harvey Wingfield exposes how hospitals, clinics, and other institutions participate in racial outsourcing, relying heavily on black doctors, nurses, technicians, and physician assistants to do equity work -extra labor that makes organizations and their services more accessible to communities of color. Wingfield argues that as these organizations become more profit driven, they come to depend on black health care professionals to perform equity work to serve increasingly diverse constituencies. Yet black workers often do this labor without recognition, compensation, or support. Operating at the intersection of work, race, gender, and class, Wingfield makes plain the challenges that black employees must overcome and reveals the complicated issues of inequality in today's workplaces and communities.

Reproducing Class Education, Neoliberalism, and the Rise of the New Middle Class in Istanbul

Reproducing Class Education, Neoliberalism, and the Rise of the New Middle Class in Istanbul

Author: Henry J. Rutz, Erol M. Balkan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/07/2019

Middle classes are by definition ambiguous, raising all sorts of paradoxical questions, perceived and real, about their power and place relative to those above and below them in a class-structured society. Focusing on families of the new middle class in Istanbul, the authors of this study address questions about the social construction of middle-class reality in the context of the rapid changes that have come about through recent economic growth in global markets and the global diffusion of information technology. After 1980, Turkey saw a structural transformation from state-owned and managed industry, banking, and media and communications to privatization and open markets. The idea of being middle class and the reality of middle-class practices became open for negotiation and interpretation. This study therefore offers a particularly interesting case study of an emergent global phenomenon known as the transnational middle class, characterized by their location of work in globalizing cities, development of transnational social networks, sumptuary consumption habits, and residences in gated communities. As the authors show, this new middle class associates quality education, followed by property and lifestyle issues, with the concept of a comfortable life.

The Politics of Whiteness Race, Workers, and Culture in the Modern South

The Politics of Whiteness Race, Workers, and Culture in the Modern South

Author: Michelle Brattain Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/07/2019

The Politics of Whiteness presents the first sustained analysis of white racial identity among workers in what was the South's largest industry for much of the twentieth century: textiles. Michelle Brattain, who grounds her work in a study of Rome, Georgia, from the Great Depression to the 1970s, adds a significant new dimension to a field that before had focused primarily on anti unionism, paternalism, or mill village culture. Many scholars have argued that racial tensions kept black and white workers from seeing their shared interests. While that may be so, says Brattain, Jim Crow and southern industry also functioned to give white workers very different and racially specific interests. Although southern politics has been traditionally defined in terms of its dominance by white elites, Brattain uncovers a surprising level of white working-class political influence and activism. Owing to the segregated nature of mill work, however, millhands' power was not felt in the form of any challenges to the racial status quo. Rather, workers re-created the local institutions and symbols of racial difference in their unions.

In All Fairness Equality, Liberty, and the Quest for Human Dignity

In All Fairness Equality, Liberty, and the Quest for Human Dignity

Author: Chris J. Coyne Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2019

Inequality is an exceptionally beautiful thing. Or maybe it's a terribly ugly thing. It depends on what is unequal and why it is unequal. Love it or loathe it, this collection is full of insights about the connections among fairness, liberty, equality and the quest for human dignity. With egalitarian sentiments and concerns about inequality on the rise, In All Fairness proves to be incredibly timely. In this collection of essays, authors challenge recent misbegotten egalitarian ideas, exposing the quicksand on which they rest and the self-serving interests they often promote. While each chapter offers unique insights, the overriding theme is that fairness must rest on a conception of humanity that recognizes the dignity of each person-a dignity that requires everyone to respect individual choices and voluntary transactions.