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Social classes

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social classes category. Presented with a red border are the Social classes books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social classes books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Chavs

Chavs

Author: Owen Jones Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/10/2020

In modern Britain, the working class has become an object of fear and ridicule. In this acclaimed investigation, Owen Jones explores how the working class has gone from salt of the earth to scum of the earth. Exposing the ignorance and prejudice at the heart of the chav caricature, he portrays a far more complex reality. The chav stereotype, he argues, is used by governments as a convenient fig leaf to avoid genuine engagement with social and economic problems and to justify widening inequality. This new edition includes a new chapter, reflecting on the overwhelming response to the book and the situation in Britain today.

Manifesto for a Dream

Manifesto for a Dream

Author: Michelle Jackson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/10/2020

A searing critique of our contemporary policy agenda, and a call to implement radical change. Although it is well known that the United States has an inequality problem, the social science community has failed to mobilize in response. Social scientists have instead adopted a strikingly insipid approach to policy reform, an ostensibly science-based approach that offers incremental, narrow-gauge, and evidence-informed interventions. This approach assumes that the best that we can do is to contain the problem. It is largely taken for granted that we will never solve it. In Manifesto for a Dream Michelle Jackson asserts that we will never make strides toward equality if we do not start to think radically. It is the structure of social institutions that generates and maintains social inequality, and it is only by attacking that structure that progress can be made. Jackson makes a scientific case for large-scale institutional reform, drawing on examples from other countries to demonstrate that reforms that have been unthinkable in the United States are considered to be quite unproblematic in other contexts. She persuasively argues that an emboldened social science has an obligation to develop and test the radical policies that would be necessary for equality to be assured for all.

Manifesto for a Dream

Manifesto for a Dream

Author: Michelle Jackson Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/10/2020

A searing critique of our contemporary policy agenda, and a call to implement radical change. Although it is well known that the United States has an inequality problem, the social science community has failed to mobilize in response. Social scientists have instead adopted a strikingly insipid approach to policy reform, an ostensibly science-based approach that offers incremental, narrow-gauge, and evidence-informed interventions. This approach assumes that the best that we can do is to contain the problem. It is largely taken for granted that we will never solve it. In Manifesto for a Dream Michelle Jackson asserts that we will never make strides toward equality if we do not start to think radically. It is the structure of social institutions that generates and maintains social inequality, and it is only by attacking that structure that progress can be made. Jackson makes a scientific case for large-scale institutional reform, drawing on examples from other countries to demonstrate that reforms that have been unthinkable in the United States are considered to be quite unproblematic in other contexts. She persuasively argues that an emboldened social science has an obligation to develop and test the radical policies that would be necessary for equality to be assured for all.

The Vanishing American Dream

The Vanishing American Dream

Author: Gene Ludwig Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/09/2020

The American Dream is perhaps our nation's single common belief. It represents the opportunity to improve our economic standing generation upon generation, whether from poverty to comfort or beyond. From Horatio Alger to Oprah Winfrey, the Dream gives us collective hope. The prevailing economic analysis for 2019 portrays a humming economy, one that should be able to support a path to prosperity for anyone willing to do their part. But in reality, traditional economic measures like the unemployment rate and GDP are masking a crisis for millions of lower- and middle-income families. For them, economic injustice has never been greater. They struggle to afford health care, housing, and education as they work jobs that cannot provide the chances they need to reverse this downward slide. It's easy enough to offer prosaic explanations for the decline of opportunity: Factories closed. Globalization pushed corporations to send the jobs overseas. Racism abounds. But for those who really want to understand what's going on, those more answers only prompt more thoughtful questions. To begin to answer those questions, Gene Ludwig invited some of the most sophisticated minds from across the political spectrum to gather in a closed setting at Yale Law School in the spring of 2019. They included policy makers, journalists, academics, and business leaders--without media or scripts. No matter their affiliation, the participants all agreed: What had once been the American dream has become an elusive myth. But how can the economy report positive growth while so many suffer? And how do we reverse their trajectory? The Vanishing American Dream documents this rare, candid conversation and offers a forum on solutions to revive the Dream for all Americans. With Contributions By: Sarah Bloom Raskin, Glenn Hubbard, Deval Patrick, Robert Shiller, Larry Summers, Luke Bronin, Daryl Byrd, Oren Cass, Jacob Hacker Heather Gerken, Susan Krause Bell, Andrea Levere, Zachary Liscow, Jonathan Macey, Daniel Markovits, Mary Miller, Michael Moskow, David Newville, Steven Pearlstein, Isabel Sawhill, Jay Shambaugh, Anika Singh Lemar, and Andrew Tisch.

Political Economy of Caste in India

Political Economy of Caste in India

Author: K S Chalam Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/09/2020

Political Economy of Caste in India presents the caste mode of production as an important analytical tool to understand the socio-economic and political dynamics of India. The book looks at caste from the economic base and also links it with the superstructure that includes judiciary, untouchability practices, caste atrocities against Dalits, social exclusion and so on. It presents empirical studies to show that the social habits of discrimination and crimes against the marginalized communities prevail even in the 21st century to physically alienate them from mainstream opportunities and ensure involuntary supply of labour at lower wages. It articulates that the economic intensity of caste can be discerned through the caste mode of production. The study brings out the limitations of some of the Marxists' understanding of caste. It also presents a distinct approach for comprehending caste and suggests that the human rights perspective is one of the ways to combat it.

Culture is Bad for You

Culture is Bad for You

Author: Orian Brook, Dave O'Brien, Mark Taylor Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 14/09/2020

Culture will keep you fit and healthy. Culture will bring communities together. Culture will improve your education. This is the message from governments and arts organisations across the country; however, this book explains why we need to be cautious about culture. Offering a powerful call to transform the cultural and creative industries, Culture is bad for you examines the intersections between race, class, and gender in the mechanisms of exclusion in cultural occupations. Exclusion from culture begins at an early age, the authors argue, and despite claims by cultural institutions and businesses to hire talented and hardworking individuals, women, people of colour, and those from working class backgrounds are systematically disbarred. While the inequalities that characterise both workforce and audience remain unaddressed, the positive contribution culture makes to society can never be fully realised. -- .

Political Economy of Caste in India

Political Economy of Caste in India

Author: K S Chalam Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 14/09/2020

Political Economy of Caste in India presents the caste mode of production as an important analytical tool to understand the socio-economic and political dynamics of India. The book looks at caste from the economic base and also links it with the superstructure that includes judiciary, untouchability practices, caste atrocities against Dalits, social exclusion and so on. It presents empirical studies to show that the social habits of discrimination and crimes against the marginalized communities prevail even in the 21st century to physically alienate them from mainstream opportunities and ensure involuntary supply of labour at lower wages. It articulates that the economic intensity of caste can be discerned through the caste mode of production. The study brings out the limitations of some of the Marxists' understanding of caste. It also presents a distinct approach for comprehending caste and suggests that the human rights perspective is one of the ways to combat it.

Hands

Hands

Author: Janet Zandy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/08/2020

What are two hands worth? In linking forms of cultural expression to labor, occupational injuries, and deaths, Hands: Physical Labor, Class, and Cultural Work centers what is usually decentered--the complex culture of working-class people. Janet Zandy begins by examining the literal loss of lives to unsafe jobs and occupational hazards. She asks critical and timely questions about worker representation--who speaks for employees when the mills, mines, factories, and even white-collar cubicles shut down? She presents the voices of working-class writers and artists, and discusses their contribution to knowledge and culture. This innovative study reveals the flesh and bone beneath the abstractions of labor, class, and culture. It is an essential contribution to the emerging field of working-class studies, offering a hybrid model for bridging communities and non-academic workers to scholars and institutions of knowledge.

Dr. Ambedkar and Untouchability

Dr. Ambedkar and Untouchability

Author: Christophe (Directeur du CERI, CERI) Jaffrelot Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/08/2020

Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar (1891-1956) rose from a community of untouchables, to become a major figure in modern Indian history. Christophe Jaffrelot's biography reconsiders Dr. Ambedkar's life and thought and his unique combination of pragmatism and idealism. Establishing himself as a scholar, activist, journalist, and educator, Ambedkar ultimately found himself immersed in Indian politics and helped to draft the nation's constitution as law minister in Nehru's first cabinet. Ambedkar's ideas remain an inspiration to India's Dalit community.

Learning to Labor

Learning to Labor

Author: Paul (Professor, Beijing Normal University) Willis, Stanley Aronowitz Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/08/2020

A landmark work in sociology, cultural studies, and ethnography since its publication in 1977, Paul Willis's Learning to Labor is a provocative and troubling account of how education links culture and class in the reproduction of social hierarchy. Willis observed a working-class friendship group in an English industrial town in the West Midlands in their final years at school. These lads rebelled against the rules and values of the school, creating their own culture of opposition. Yet this resistance to official norms, Willis argues, prepared these students for working-class employment. Rebelling against authority made the lads experience the constraints that held them in subordinate class positions as choices of their own volition. Learning to Labor demonstrates the pervasiveness of class in lived experience. Its detailed and sympathetic ethnography emphasizes subjectivity and the role of working-class people in making their culture. Willis shows how resistance does not simply challenge the social order, but also constitutes it. The lessons of Learning to Labor apply as much to the United States as to the United Kingdom, especially the finding that education, rather than helping overcome hierarchies, can often perpetuate them, which is of renewed relevance at a time when education is trumpeted as meritocratic and a panacea for inequality.

Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

Author: Dennis Gilbert Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2020