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Social classes

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social classes category. Presented with a red border are the Social classes books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social classes books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Culture is Bad for You

Culture is Bad for You

Author: Orian Brook, Dave O'Brien, Mark Taylor Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 14/09/2020

Culture will keep you fit and healthy. Culture will bring communities together. Culture will improve your education. This is the message from governments and arts organisations across the country; however, this book explains why we need to be cautious about culture. Offering a powerful call to transform the cultural and creative industries, Culture is bad for you examines the link between social inequality and who produces, consumes and participates in culture. Exclusion from culture begins at an early age, the authors argue, and despite claims by cultural institutions and businesses to hire talented and hardworking individuals, women, people of colour, and those from working class backgrounds are systematically disbarred. While the inequalities that characterise both workforce and audience remain unaddressed, the positive contribution culture makes to society can never be fully realised. -- .

American Misfits and the Making of Middle-Class Respectability

American Misfits and the Making of Middle-Class Respectability

Author: Robert Wuthnow Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2020

How American respectability has been built by maligning those who don't make the grade How did Americans come to think of themselves as respectable members of the middle class? Was it just by earning a decent living? Or did it require something more? And if it did, what can we learn that may still apply? The quest for middle-class respectability in nineteenth-century America is usually described as a process of inculcating positive values such as honesty, hard work, independence, and cultural refinement. But clergy, educators, and community leaders also defined respectability negatively, by maligning individuals and groups- misfits -who deviated from accepted norms. Robert Wuthnow argues that respectability is constructed by othering people who do not fit into easily recognizable, socially approved categories. He demonstrates this through an in-depth examination of a wide variety of individuals and groups that became objects of derision. We meet a disabled Civil War veteran who worked as a huckster on the edges of the frontier, the wife of a lunatic who raised her family while her husband was institutionalized, an immigrant religious community accused of sedition, and a wealthy scion charged with profiteering. Unlike respected Americans who marched confidently toward worldly and heavenly success, such misfits were usually ignored in paeans about the nation. But they played an important part in the cultural work that made America, and their story is essential for understanding the othering that remains so much a part of American culture and politics today.

Paupers

Paupers

Author: Bill Jordan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2020

Originally published in 1973, Paupers looks at poverty through the lens of class and the Welfare State. The book examines those living in poverty, and the direct effects poverty has. The book follows the basis that the economic factors which gave rise to poverty, have little to do with the Welfare State, and that fragmentary changes, can do little to change them. The book's core argument examines the political and social significance of poverty, and look at the underlying causes and effects of the drift towards a more unequal and unjust society. The book also analyses the factors which bring economically disadvantaged people together, and what happens when they join for collective action.

Caste

Caste

Author: Isabel Wilkerson Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/08/2020

'The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power - which groups have it and which do not' Beyond race or class, our lives are defined by a powerful, unspoken system of divisions. In Caste, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson gives an astounding portrait of this hidden phenomenon. Linking America, India and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson reveals how our world has been shaped by caste - and how its rigid, arbitrary hierarchies still divide us today. With clear-sighted rigour, Wilkerson unearths the eight pillars that connect caste systems across civilizations, and demonstrates how our own era of intensifying conflict and upheaval has arisen as a consequence of caste. Weaving in stories of real people, she shows how its insidious undertow emerges every day; she documents its surprising health costs; and she explores its effects on culture and politics. Finally, Wilkerson points forward to the ways we can - and must - move beyond its artificial divisions, towards our common humanity. Beautifully written and deeply original, Caste is an eye-opening examination of what lies beneath the surface of ordinary lives. No one can afford to ignore the moral clarity of its insights, or its urgent call for a freer, fairer world.

White Bred

White Bred

Author: Eric Kerl Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/08/2020

J. D. Vance's Hillbilly Elegy, published just before the election of Donald Trump, thrust the people of Appalachia into the spotlight. Perplexed by the specter of white poverty and apparent backwardness, liberals and progressives turned to Vance's Elegy to understand Appalachians. Instead, what they found was a blame-the-victim narrative that wouldn't pass the smell test of racism in any other case. White Bred is the antidote to the narrow and myopic characterizations of Appalachians that Vance pushes. Kerl draws on a rich tradition of Appalachian scholars and left-wing writers to illuminate questions of poverty, racism, underdevelopment, and social struggle in the region. White Bred begins with the colonization of America and the use of white bondspeople from England, Ireland, Scotland, and Germany. Not only did the Civil War and Reconstruction periods radically highlight the crimes of Black slavery, they also exposed the chasms of inequality, resentment, and bitter violence that existed within the white population-particularly in the South. Kerl goes on to examine the dispossession, subjugation, racialization, and resistance movements of Appalachian people, from the role of country music in poor white and working-class life to the multiracial movements standing up to resist white supremacy and racism. Eric Kerl is a Kentuckian living, working, organizing, and writing in Chicago. His articles have appeared on ReWire.News, International Socialist Review, 100 Days in Appalachia, Socialist Worker, and elsewhere.

Poverty and Place

Poverty and Place

Author: Anjanette Wells, Vetta L Thompson, Will Ross, Carol Camp Yeakey Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/2020

This book examines ways in which cancer health disparities exist due to class and context inequities even in the most advanced society of the world. This volume, while articulating health disparities in the St. Louis, Missouri metropolitan area, including East St. Louis, Illinois, seeks to move beyond deficit models to focus on health equity. As cancer disparities continue to persist for low-income and women of color, the promotion and attainment of health equity becomes a matter of paramount importance. The volume demonstrates the importance of place and the historical inequity in socio-environmental settings that have contributed to marked health disparities. Through original research, this volume demonstrates that addressing the causes and contributors to women's health disparities is a complex process that requires intervention from a socio-ecological framework, at micro-, meso-, and macro-levels of influence. The book highlights critical aspects of a practical multidimensional model of community engagement with important influences of the various levels of research, policy and practice. More pointedly, the authors support a new model of community engagement that focuses on individuals in their broader ecological context. In so doing, they seek to advance the art and science of community engagement and collaboration, while disavowing the 'parachute' model of research, policy and practice that reinforces and sustains the problems associated with the status quo. The book concludes with broader national policy considerations in the face of the erosion of the social safety net for America's citizenry.

The Other America

The Other America

Author: Harris (Birmingham City University) Beider, Kusminder (Birmingham City University) Chahal Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/07/2020

Widely stereotyped as anti-immigrant, against civil-rights or supporters of Trump and the right, can the white working class of America really be reduced to a singular group with similar views? Based on extensive interviews across five cities at a crucial point in US history, this significant book showcases what the white working class think about many of the defining issues of the age - from race, identity and change to the crucial on-the-ground debates occurring at the time of the 2016 US election. As the 2020 presidential elections draw near, this is an invaluable insight into the complex views on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, and the extent and reach they have to engage in cross-racial connections.

Everybody Else

Everybody Else

Author: Sarah Potter Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/06/2020

In the popular imagination, the twenty years after World War II are associated with simpler, happier, more family-focused living. We think of stereotypical baby boom families like the Cleavers - white, suburban, and well on their way to middle-class affluence. For these couples and their children, a happy, stable family life provided an antidote to the anxieties and uncertainties of the emerging nuclear age. But not everyone looked or lived like the Cleavers. For those who could not have children, or have as many children as they wanted, the postwar baby boom proved a source of social stigma and personal pain. Further, in 1950 roughly one in three Americans made below middle-class incomes, and over fifteen million lived under Jim Crow segregation. For these individuals, home life was not an oasis but a challenge, intimately connected to the era's many political and social upheavals. Everybody Else provides a comparative analysis of diverse postwar families and examines the lives and case records of men and women who applied to adopt or provide pre-adoptive foster care in the 1940s and 1950s. It considers an array of individuals - both black and white, middle and working class - who found themselves on the margins of a social world that privileged family membership. These couples wanted adoptive and foster children in order to achieve a sense of personal mission and meaning, as well as a deeper feeling of belonging to their communities. But their quest for parenthood also highlighted the many inequities of that era. These individuals' experiences seeking children reveal that the baby boom family was about much more than togetherness or a quiet house in the suburbs; it also shaped people's ideas about the promises and perils of getting ahead in postwar America.

Typecasting

Typecasting

Author: Elizabeth Ewen, Stuart Ewen Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/06/2020

Race, Ethnicity, and Power in Ecuador

Race, Ethnicity, and Power in Ecuador

Author: Karem Roitman Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/05/2020

How do today's Latin American elites understand and relate to ideas of power, race, ethnicity, and mestizaje? And what impact does that understanding have on the dynamics of socioeconomic development in ethnically mixed societies? Focusing on the case of Ecuador - a country struggling to recast its mestizo identity in the aftermath of dramatic indigenous uprisings - Karem Roitman reveals how the urban upper classes represent their ethnicity in ways that both hide discriminatory practices and impede social and economic mobility for the 'other'. This book also reveals how Ecuador's urban upper classes represent their mestizo identity in ways that both hide discriminatory practices and impede social and economic mobility for the 'other'.

The Social Analysis of Class Structure

The Social Analysis of Class Structure

Author: Frank Parkin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/05/2020

Originally published in 1974, The Social Analysis of Class Structure is an edited collection addressing class formation and class relations in industrial society. The range and variety of the contributions provide a useful guide to the central concerns of British sociology in the 1970s. Encompassing general theorizing and empirical investigation, the book examines the treatment of crucial issues of the day, such as the relationships between race and class formation, and sexual subordination, as well addressing historical questions such as the Victorian labour aristocracy and the incorporation of the working class.