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Social classes

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social classes category. Presented with a red border are the Social classes books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social classes books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

What We Mean by the American Dream

What We Mean by the American Dream

Author: Doron Taussig Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/04/2021

Doron Taussig invites us to question the American Dream. Did you earn what you have? Did everyone else? The American Dream is built on the idea that Americans end up roughly where we deserve to be in our working lives based on our efforts and abilities; in other words, the United States is supposed to be a meritocracy. When Americans think and talk about our lives, we grapple with this idea, asking how a person got to where he or she is and whether he or she earned it. In What We Mean by the American Dream, Taussig tries to find out how we answer those questions. Weaving together interviews with Americans from many walks of life-as well as stories told in the US media about prominent figures from politics, sports, and business-What We Mean by the American Dream investigates how we think about whether an individual deserves an opportunity, job, termination, paycheck, or fortune. Taussig looks into the fabric of American life to explore how various people, including dairy farmers, police officers, dancers, teachers, computer technicians, students, store clerks, the unemployed, homemakers, and even drug dealers got to where they are today and whether they earned it or not. Taussig's frank assessment of the state of the US workforce and its dreams allows him to truly and meaningfully ask the question that underpins so many of our political debates and personal frustrations: Did you earn it? By doing so, he sheds new light on what we mean by-and how we can deliver on-the American Dream of today.

Broke in America

Broke in America

Author: Joanne Samuel Goldblum, Colleen Shaddox, Bomani Jones Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/02/2021

Water. Food. Housing. The most basic and crucial needs for survival, yet 40 percent of people in the United States don't have the resources to get them. With key policy changes, we could eradicate poverty in this country within our lifetime-but we need to get started now. Nearly 40 million people in the United States live below the poverty line-about $26,200 for a family of four. Low-income families and individuals are everywhere, from cities to rural communities. While poverty is commonly seen as a personal failure, or a deficiency of character or knowledge, it's actually the result of bad policy. Public policy has purposefully erected barriers that deny access to basic needs, creating a society where people can easily become trapped-not because we lack the resources to lift them out, but because we are actively choosing not to. Poverty is close to inevitable for low-wage workers and their children, and a large percentage of these people, despite qualifying for it, do not receive government aid. From Joanne Samuel Goldblum and Colleen Shaddox, Broke in America offers an eye-opening and galvanizing look at life in poverty in this country: how circumstances and public policy conspire to keep people poor, and the concrete steps we can take to end poverty for good. In clear, accessible prose, Goldblum and Shaddox detail the ways the current system is broken and how it's failing so many of us. They also highlight outdated and ineffective policies that are causing or contributing to this unnecessary problem. Every chapter features action items readers can use to combat poverty-both nationwide and in our local communities, including the most effective public policies you can support and how to work hand-in-hand with representatives to affect change. So far, our attempted solutions have fallen short because they try to fix poor people rather than address the underlying problems. Fortunately, it's much easier to fix policy than people. Essential and timely, Broke in America offers a crucial road map for securing a brighter future.

Japanese Industrialization and Its Social Consequences

Japanese Industrialization and Its Social Consequences

Author: Hugh Patrick Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/02/2021

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1976.

The Africanization of the Labor Market

The Africanization of the Labor Market

Author: Remi Clignet Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/02/2021

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1976.

The Africanization of the Labor Market

The Africanization of the Labor Market

Author: Remi Clignet Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/02/2021

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1976.

Japanese Industrialization and Its Social Consequences

Japanese Industrialization and Its Social Consequences

Author: Hugh Patrick Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/02/2021

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press's mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1976.

Freedom From the Market

Freedom From the Market

Author: Mike Konczal Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/01/2021

The progressive economics writer redefines the national conversation about American freedom Health insurance, student loan debt, retirement security, child care, work-life balance, access to home ownership-these are the issues driving America's current political debates. And they are all linked, as this brilliant and timely book reveals, by a single question: should we allow the free market to determine our lives? In the tradition of Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine, noted economic commentator Mike Konczal answers this question with a resounding no. Freedom from the Market blends passionate political argument and a bold new take on American history to reveal that, from the earliest days of the republic, Americans have defined freedom as what we keep free from the control of the market. With chapters on the history of the Homestead Act and land ownership, the eight-hour work day and free time, social insurance and Social Security, World War II day cares, Medicare and desegregation, free public colleges, intellectual property, and the public corporation, Konczal shows how citizens have fought to ensure that everyone has access to the conditions that make us free. At a time when millions of Americans-and more and more politicians-are questioning the unregulated free market, Freedom from the Market offers a new narrative, and new intellectual ammunition, for the fight that lies ahead.

Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

Mexico's Middle Class in the Neoliberal Era

Author: Dennis Gilbert Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/01/2021

Everybody Else

Everybody Else

Author: Sarah Potter Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/01/2021

In the popular imagination, the twenty years after World War II are associated with simpler, happier, more family-focused living. We think of stereotypical baby boom families like the Cleavers - white, suburban, and well on their way to middle-class affluence. For these couples and their children, a happy, stable family life provided an antidote to the anxieties and uncertainties of the emerging nuclear age. But not everyone looked or lived like the Cleavers. For those who could not have children, or have as many children as they wanted, the postwar baby boom proved a source of social stigma and personal pain. Further, in 1950 roughly one in three Americans made below middle-class incomes, and over fifteen million lived under Jim Crow segregation. For these individuals, home life was not an oasis but a challenge, intimately connected to the era's many political and social upheavals. Everybody Else provides a comparative analysis of diverse postwar families and examines the lives and case records of men and women who applied to adopt or provide pre-adoptive foster care in the 1940s and 1950s. It considers an array of individuals - both black and white, middle and working class - who found themselves on the margins of a social world that privileged family membership. These couples wanted adoptive and foster children in order to achieve a sense of personal mission and meaning, as well as a deeper feeling of belonging to their communities. But their quest for parenthood also highlighted the many inequities of that era. These individuals' experiences seeking children reveal that the baby boom family was about much more than togetherness or a quiet house in the suburbs; it also shaped people's ideas about the promises and perils of getting ahead in postwar America.

Race, Ethnicity, and Power in Ecuador

Race, Ethnicity, and Power in Ecuador

Author: Karem Roitman Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/01/2021

How do today's Latin American elites understand and relate to ideas of power, race, ethnicity, and mestizaje? And what impact does that understanding have on the dynamics of socioeconomic development in ethnically mixed societies? Focusing on the case of Ecuador - a country struggling to recast its mestizo identity in the aftermath of dramatic indigenous uprisings - Karem Roitman reveals how the urban upper classes represent their ethnicity in ways that both hide discriminatory practices and impede social and economic mobility for the 'other'. This book also reveals how Ecuador's urban upper classes represent their mestizo identity in ways that both hide discriminatory practices and impede social and economic mobility for the 'other'.

The Politics of Whiteness

The Politics of Whiteness

Author: Michelle Brattain Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/01/2021

The Politics of Whiteness presents the first sustained analysis of white racial identity among workers in what was the South's largest industry for much of the twentieth century: textiles. Michelle Brattain, who grounds her work in a study of Rome, Georgia, from the Great Depression to the 1970s, adds a significant new dimension to a field that before had focused primarily on anti unionism, paternalism, or mill village culture. Many scholars have argued that racial tensions kept black and white workers from seeing their shared interests. While that may be so, says Brattain, Jim Crow and southern industry also functioned to give white workers very different and racially specific interests. Although southern politics has been traditionally defined in terms of its dominance by white elites, Brattain uncovers a surprising level of white working-class political influence and activism. Owing to the segregated nature of mill work, however, millhands' power was not felt in the form of any challenges to the racial status quo. Rather, workers re-created the local institutions and symbols of racial difference in their unions.

American Indian Intellectuals of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

American Indian Intellectuals of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

Author: Margot Liberty Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/01/2021

Based on papers delivered at the 1976 meeting of the American Ethnological Society, American Indian Intellectuals of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries offers biographical sketches of major American Indian scholars and historians between 1828 and 1975.Edited by Margot Liberty, this book includes important individuals from throughout the United States, including the Northwest Coast (William Beynon), the Great Basin(Sarah Winnemucca), the Southwest(Flora Zuni), the Northeast (Jesse Cornplanter, Alexander General, Arthur Parker, and Ely Parker), and the Plains (George Bushotter, Charles Eastman, Francis La Flesche, John Joseph Mathews, James Murie, and Bill Shakespeare). As liberty notes in her introduction, the biographies of these individuals are marked by the awareness of life-ways precious because they were unique, each in its own way, and more precious because they were rapidly vanishing. Linked to this awareness was dedication to the task of preserving at least something for the future ....There is no more poignant record of the pressures of acculturation than some of the personal vignettes presented here.