LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Social discrimination & inequality

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social discrimination & inequality category. Presented with a red border are the Social discrimination & inequality books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social discrimination & inequality books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Realising the Dream

Realising the Dream

Author: Crain Soudien Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/08/2020

Realising the Dream: Unlearning the Logic of Race in the South African School is an intellectual and practical response to the dangers that come with the ubiquity of race, race-thinking and its attendant propensity to subsume the nuances of all other social complexity. Beginning with a comprehensive scoping of the theoretical literature on race and social difference, the book delivers a meticulous examination of how the 'logic of race' is played out in the lives of post-apartheid South African school students. Based in two decades of empirical research, this compelling and insightful analysis reveals how the ongoing preoccupation with race not only obscures but also prevents the evolution of new ways of understanding privilege and subordination. We dream of a better world. The fundamental promise of education, the author argues, is to develop the capacity to make real, in our will and desire, this possibility. However, the dream can be fully realised only when the learnt prejudices and false certainties of race, gender and indeed all our unproblematised conceits about who and what we are, are unlearnt. Written by one of South Africa's foremost theorists of school education, this book is as brave as it is challenging - an inspiring, essential read for education practitioners and students in particular, and social theorists more broadly.

Commemorating Brown

Commemorating Brown

Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/08/2020

Brown v. Board of Education was the landmark 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision that declared racial segregation illegal in the United States. Commemorating Brown offers a critical retrospective on the role of psychological research in the fight against racism and discrimination and an up-to-date review of the psychology of racism and its implications for schools, the workplace, and public policy. The chapters provide a historical perspective on the Brown decision, including its promise as a mechanism for social justice, the reasons why its promise remains unfulfilled, and its ongoing relevance in a contemporary context of increasing resegregation.Equally important, chapter authors identify emerging directions for action in the continuing struggle against racism and oppression, including multicultural and international perspectives on racism that highlight the role of identity processes and collectively constructed realities (e.g., social representations of fairness, integration, merit, and American history). Finally, the editors describe a sociocultural approach to the psychology of racism and oppression that integrates diverse programs of theory and research in social psychology.This book critiques the role of social psychology in the study of racism. It emphasizes present-day challenges in overcoming racism and discrimination. It sketches a sociocultural approach to racism and oppression. It also considers diverse perspectives on racism (e.g., with respect to Latino and Asian immigrants, Native peoples, and the South African context).It presents collected research on a particular subject. It provides a practical analysis of research results. It links psychology to societal currents. It also highlights directions for future action.

The Borders of Race Patrolling Multiracial Identities

The Borders of Race Patrolling Multiracial Identities

Author: Melinda Mills Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 04/08/2020

Who is multiracial ? And who decides? Addressing these two fundamental questions, Melinda Mills builds on the work of Heather Dalmage to explore the phenomenon - and consequences - of racial border patrolling by strangers, family members, friends, and even multiracial people themselves.

Why Men Win at Work

Why Men Win at Work

Author: Gill Whitty-Collins Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/08/2020

'And then I saw it. And once I had seen it, I saw it everywhere. Why are men still winning at work? If women have equal leadership ability, why are they so under-represented at the top in business and society? Why are we still living in a man's world? And why do we accept it? In this provocative book, Gill Whitty-Collins looks beyond the facts and figures on gender bias and uncovers the invisible discrimination that continues to sabotage us in the workplace and limits our shared success. Addressing both men and women and pulling no punches, she sets out the psychology of gender diversity from the perspective of real personal experience and shares her powerful insights on how to tackle gender equality.

Like Wildfire

Like Wildfire

Author: Sean Patrick O'Rourke Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/07/2020

The sit-ins of the American civil rights movement were extraordinary acts of dissent in an age marked by protest. By sitting in at whites only lunch counters, libraries, beaches, swimming pools, skating rinks, and churches, young African Americans and their allies put their lives on the line, fully aware that their actions would almost inevitably incite hateful, violent responses from entrenched and increasingly desperate white segregationists. And yet they did so in great numbers: most estimates suggest that in 1960 alone more than seventy thousand young people participated in sit-ins across the American South and more than three thousand were arrested. The simplicity and purity of the act of sitting in, coupled with the dignity and grace exhibited by participants, lent to the sit-in movement's sanctity and peaceful power. In Like Wildfire, editors Sean Patrick O'Rourke and Lesli K. Pace seek to clarify and analyze the power of civil rights sit-ins as rhetorical acts--persuasive campaigns designed to alter perceptions of apartheid social structures and to change the attitudes, laws, and policies that supported those structures. These cohesive essays from leading scholars offer a new appraisal of the origins, growth, and legacy of the sit-ins, which has gone largely ignored in scholarly literature. The authors examine different forms of sitting-in and the evolution of the rhetorical dynamics of sit-in protests, detailing the organizational strategies they employed and connecting them to later protests. By focusing on the persuasive power of demanding space, the contributors articulate the ways in which the protestors' battle for basic civil rights shaped social practices, laws, and the national dialogue. O'Rourke and Pace maintain that the legacies of the civil rights sit-ins have been many, complicated, and at times undervalued.

Everyday Bias

Everyday Bias

Author: Howard J. Ross Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/07/2020

To be human is to be biased. From this simple truth, nationally recognized diversity expert Howard J. Ross explores the biases we each carry within us. Incorporating anecdotes from today's headlines alongside case studies from over 30 years of diversity consulting, Ross helps readers understand how unconscious bias impacts our day-to-day lives and, particularly, our daily work lives. And, he answers the question: Is there anything we can do about it? by providing examples of behaviors that the reader can engage in to disengage the impact of their own biases. Originally published in 2014, the updated edition draws new examples from today's headlines such as the #me too Movement, police shootings, and bias in the ever more partisan Trump era.

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country

Author: Roy DeBerry, Aviva Futorian, Stephen Klein, John Lyons Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/07/2020

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country is a collection of interviews with residents of Benton County, Mississippi - an area with a long and fascinating civil rights history. The product of more than twenty-five years of work by the Hill Country Project, this volume examines a revolutionary period in American history through the voices of farmers, teachers, sharecroppers, and students. No other rural farming county in the American South has yet been afforded such a deep dive into its civil rights experiences and their legacies. These accumulated stories truly capture life before, during, and after the movement. The authors' approach places the region's history in context and reveals everyday struggles. African American residents of Benton County had been organizing since the 1930s. Citizens formed a local chapter of the NAACP in the 1940s and '50s. One of the first Mississippi counties to get a federal registrar under the 1965 Voting Rights Act, Benton achieved the highest per capita total of African American registered voters in Mississippi. Locals produced a regular, clandestinely distributed newsletter, the Benton County Freedom Train. In addition to documenting this previously unrecorded history, personal narratives capture pivotal moments of individual lives and lend insight into the human cost and the long-term effects of social movements. Benton County residents explain the events that shaped their lives and ultimately, in their own humble way, helped shape the trajectory of America. Through these first-person stories and with dozens of captivating photos covering more than a century's worth of history, the volume presents a vivid picture of a people and a region still striving for the prize of equality and justice.

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country

Author: Roy DeBerry, Aviva Futorian, Stephen Klein, John Lyons Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2020

Voices from the Mississippi Hill Country is a collection of interviews with residents of Benton County, Mississippi - an area with a long and fascinating civil rights history. The product of more than twenty-five years of work by the Hill Country Project, this volume examines a revolutionary period in American history through the voices of farmers, teachers, sharecroppers, and students. No other rural farming county in the American South has yet been afforded such a deep dive into its civil rights experiences and their legacies. These accumulated stories truly capture life before, during, and after the movement. The authors' approach places the region's history in context and reveals everyday struggles. African American residents of Benton County had been organizing since the 1930s. Citizens formed a local chapter of the NAACP in the 1940s and '50s. One of the first Mississippi counties to get a federal registrar under the 1965 Voting Rights Act, Benton achieved the highest per capita total of African American registered voters in Mississippi. Locals produced a regular, clandestinely distributed newsletter, the Benton County Freedom Train. In addition to documenting this previously unrecorded history, personal narratives capture pivotal moments of individual lives and lend insight into the human cost and the long-term effects of social movements. Benton County residents explain the events that shaped their lives and ultimately, in their own humble way, helped shape the trajectory of America. Through these first-person stories and with dozens of captivating photos covering more than a century's worth of history, the volume presents a vivid picture of a people and a region still striving for the prize of equality and justice.

But Now I See

But Now I See

Author: Fred Hobson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/07/2020

The term conversion narrative usually refers to a particular form of expression that arose in Puritan New England in the seventeenth century. In that sense, the purely religious, the conversion narrative belongs to a rather remote history. But in this lucid, pathbreaking work, Fred Hobson uses the expression in another sense, in the realm of the secular, to describe a much more recent phenomenon, one originating in the American South and marking a new mode of southern self-expression not seen until the 1940s. Hobson applies the term racial conversion narrative to several autobiographies or works of highly personal social commentary by Lillian Smith, James McBride Dabbs, Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin, Sarah Patton Boyle, Will Campbell, Larry L. King, Willie Morris, Pat Watters, and other southerners, books written between the mid-1940s and the late 1970s in which the authors, all products of and willing participants in a harsh, segregated society, confess racial wrongdoings and are converted, in varying degrees, from racism to something approaching racial enlightenment. Indeed, the language of many of these works is, Hobson points out, the language of religious conversion, sin, guilt, blindness, seeing the light, repentance, redemption, and so forth. Hobson also looks at recent autobiographical volumes by Ellen Douglas, Elizabeth Spencer, and Rick Bragg to show how the medium persists, if in a somewhat different form, even at the very end of the twentieth century. But Now I See is a study both of this particular variety of the southern impulse to self-examination and of those who seem to have retained the habit of seeking redemption, even if of a secular variety. Departing from the old vertical southern religion, salvation-centered with heaven as its goal, these racial converts embrace a horizontal religion which holds that getting right with man is at least as important as getting right with God. A refreshingly original treatment of racial change in the South, Hobson's provocative work introduces a new subgenre in the field of southern literature. Anyone interested in the history and literature of the American South will be fascinated by this searching volume.

The Costa Rican Catholic Church, Social Justice, and the Rights of Workers, 1979-1996

The Costa Rican Catholic Church, Social Justice, and the Rights of Workers, 1979-1996

Author: Dana Sawchuk Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/07/2020

Provides a new understanding of the relationship between Church and State in 20th-century Costa Rica. Understanding the relationship between religion and social justice in Costa Rica involves piecing together the complex interrelationships between Church and State a between priests, popes, politics, and the people. This book does just that. Dana Sawchuk chronicles the fortunes of the country's two competing forms of labour organizations during the 1980s and demonstrates how different factions within the Church came to support either the union movement or Costa Rica's home-grown Solidarity movement. Challenging the conventional understanding of Costa Rica as a wholly peaceful and prosperous nation, and traditional interpretations of Catholic Social Teaching, this book introduces readers to a Church largely unknown outside Costa Rica. Sawchuk has carefully analyzed material from a multitude of sources a interviews, newspapers, books, and articles, as well as official Church documents, editorials, and statements by Church representativesto provide a firmly rooted socio-economic history of the experiences of workers, and the Catholic Church's responses to workers in Costa Rica.

Measuring the Effects of Racism

Measuring the Effects of Racism

Author: Robert T. Carter, Alex L. Pieterse Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/07/2020

A large body of research has established a causal relationship between experiences of racial discrimination and adverse effects on mental and physical health. In Measuring the Effects of Racism, Robert T. Carter and Alex L. Pieterse offer a manual for mental health professionals on how to understand, assess, and treat the effects of racism as a psychological injury. Carter and Pieterse provide guidance on how to recognize the psychological effects of racism and racial discrimination. They propose an approach to understanding racism that connects particular experiences and incidents with a person's individual psychological and emotional response. They detail how to evaluate the specific effects of race-based encounters that produce psychological distress and possibly impairment or trauma. Carter and Pieterse outline therapeutic interventions for use with individuals and groups who have experienced racial trauma, and they draw attention to the importance of racial awareness for practitioners. The book features a racial-trauma assessment toolkit, including a race-based traumatic-stress symptoms scale and interview schedule. Useful for both scholars and practitioners, including social workers, educators, and counselors, Measuring the Effects of Racism offers a new framework of race-based traumatic stress that helps legitimize psychological reactions to experiences of racism.