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Social discrimination & inequality

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social discrimination & inequality category. Presented with a red border are the Social discrimination & inequality books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social discrimination & inequality books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Like Wildfire

Like Wildfire

Author: Sean Patrick O'Rourke Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2020

The sit-ins of the American civil rights movement were extraordinary acts of dissent in an age marked by protest. By sitting in at whites only lunch counters, libraries, beaches, swimming pools, skating rinks, and churches, young African Americans and their allies put their lives on the line, fully aware that their actions would almost inevitably incite hateful, violent responses from entrenched and increasingly desperate white segregationists. And yet they did so in great numbers: most estimates suggest that in 1960 alone more than seventy thousand young people participated in sit-ins across the American South and more than three thousand were arrested. The simplicity and purity of the act of sitting in, coupled with the dignity and grace exhibited by participants, lent to the sit-in movement's sanctity and peaceful power. In Like Wildfire, editors Sean Patrick O'Rourke and Lesli K. Pace seek to clarify and analyze the power of civil rights sit-ins as rhetorical acts--persuasive campaigns designed to alter perceptions of apartheid social structures and to change the attitudes, laws, and policies that supported those structures. These cohesive essays from leading scholars offer a new appraisal of the origins, growth, and legacy of the sit-ins, which has gone largely ignored in scholarly literature. The authors examine different forms of sitting-in and the evolution of the rhetorical dynamics of sit-in protests, detailing the organizational strategies they employed and connecting them to later protests. By focusing on the persuasive power of demanding space, the contributors articulate the ways in which the protestors' battle for basic civil rights shaped social practices, laws, and the national dialogue. O'Rourke and Pace maintain that the legacies of the civil rights sit-ins have been many, complicated, and at times undervalued.

White Balance

White Balance

Author: Justin Gomer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2020

The racial ideology of colorblindness has a long history. In 1963, Martin Luther King famously stated, I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. However, in the decades after the civil rights movement, the ideology of colorblindness co-opted the language of the civil rights era in order to reinvent white supremacy and dismantle the civil rights movement's legal victories without offending political decorum. Yet, the spread of colorblindness could not merely happen through political speeches, newspapers, or books. The key, Justin Gomer contends, was film--as race-conscious language was expelled from public discourse, Hollywood provided the visual medium necessary to dramatize an anti-civil rights agenda over the course of the 70s, 80s, and 90s. In blockbusters like Dirty Harry, Rocky, and Dangerous Minds, filmmakers capitalized upon the volatile racial, social, and economic struggles in the decades after the civil rights movement, shoring up a powerful, bipartisan ideology that would be wielded against race-conscious policy, the memory of black freedom struggles, and core aspects of the liberal state itself.

When Stereotype Meets Prejudice - Antiziganism in European Societies

When Stereotype Meets Prejudice - Antiziganism in European Societies

Author: Timofey Agarin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/06/2020

My White Best Friend

My White Best Friend

Author: Rachel (Author) De-Lahay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/06/2020

Could you put your white best friend on stage and remind them that they're part of the problem? Even if you love them? Even if you never want anyone to feel for even a moment how you feel living in this world every day? Would - could - a white person finally hear what you have to say? _x000D_ Originally commissioned by The Bunker Theatre as a critically-acclaimed festival that ran in 2019, My White Best Friend collects 23 letters that engage with a range of topics, from racial tensions, microaggressions and emotional labour, to queer desire, prejudice and otherness. Expressing feelings and thoughts often stifled or ignored, the pieces here transform letter writing into a provocative act of candour. _x000D_ Funny, heartfelt, wry and heart-breaking, whether a letter to their younger self or an ode to the writer's tongue, this anthology of exceptional writing is always engaging and thought-provoking. _x000D_ Featuring different letters from some of the most exciting voices in the UK and beyond, My White Best Friend (And Other Letters Left Unsaid) includes work from: Zia Ahmed, Travis Alabanza, Fatimah Asghar, Nathan Bryon, Matilda Ibini, Jammz, Iman Qureshi, Anya Reiss, Somalia Seaton, Nina Segal, Tolani Shoneye, Lena Dunham, Inua Ellams, Rabiah Hussain, Mika Johnson, Jasmine Lee-Jones, Suhaiymah Manzoor-Khan, Shireen Mula, Ash Sarkar, Jack Thorne and Joel Tan.

Me and White Supremacy

Me and White Supremacy

Author: Layla Saad, Robin DiAngelo Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/06/2020

'White supremacy is a violent system of oppression that harms Black, Indigenous and People of Colour. And if you are a person who holds white privilege, then you are complicit in upholding that harm, whether you realise it or not. This is not my opinion. This is fact. And if you are person who holds white privilege, the question you should be asking isn't whether or not this is true, but rather, what are you going to do about it?' Between June and July 2018, Layla Saad ran a 28-day Instagram challenge under the hashtag #MeAndWhiteSupremacy, for people with white privilege to unflinchingly examine the ways that they are complicit in upholding the oppressive system of white supremacy. The challenge quickly went viral, with thousands of people from all over the world (including USA, Canada, UK, Italy, Germany, The Netherlands, Russia, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Thailand and Qatar, among others) diving deep for 28 consecutive days to examine and take responsibility for the ways in which they uphold white supremacy. The challenge catalyzed a worldwide awakening for thousands of white-privileged people to begin to take ownership of their personal anti-racism work. This workbook was born out of that challenge.

Working Relationships

Working Relationships

Author: Richard G. Luecking, Ellen S. Fabian, George P. Tilson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/06/2020

This work covers securing satisfying jobs for people with disabilities by fostering partnerships between employment specialists and businesses. It helps readers to: understand the theoretical framework for improving career development practices through relationship building; understand what employers want and expect from employment service providers; learn about the building blocks of strong partnerships with employers; find practical guidelines for getting to know both job seekers and employers, marketing proactively to businesses, matching job seeker characteristics with employer needs; consider the possibility of non-traditional employment through customized job consultation; and explore specific ways to make employment service programmes more customer-oriented and understandable to employers.

Race and the Construction of the Dispensable Other

Race and the Construction of the Dispensable Other

Author: Bernard Magubane Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/06/2020

The book brings together a formidable array of primary sources to present an exposition of the foundations and proliferation of racism. The author examines the way in which black people came to be enslaved, denigrated, likened to wild animals, and regarded as an inferior, dispensable 'other'. He also questions why philosophers, political theorists and intellectuals, who were supposedly committed to the ideals of the enlightenment, were seduced by settler colonialism to the extent that they closed their eyes to its ravaging effects upon indigenous people.It explores the deployment of race in the work of such respected thinkers as Edward Long, the Evangelicals, Robert Knox and James Hunt. It exposes eugenics and the doctrine of class and racial supremacy, as espoused by men of science such as Francis Galton and Karl Pearson. The virtual extinction of the Tasmanians, one of the most chilling examples of the use of race as an imperial weapon, is the forerunner of what will be a compelling chapter for many readers: the political economy of scientific racism in South Africa.

Who Gets The Good Jobs?

Who Gets The Good Jobs?

Author: Robert Cherry Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/06/2020

Racial and gender employment inequalities are alive and well today. In 2000, the U.S. government offered $508 million to settle more than one thousand lawsuits brought against the federally funded Voice of America by female workers. At the same time, African American employees of Coca-Cola sued their employer, citing the large number of minorities in low-paying jobs, with just a handful at top levels. Even Alan Greenspan has urged firms to eliminate the distortions that arise as a result of discrimination. The political agenda regarding this issue is polarized. Many conservative economists claim that financial considerations have led businesses to hire minorities because such practices increase profits. In opposition, many liberal economists believe businesses will hire minorities only if forced to do so by equal employment opportunity policies. Robert Cherry bridges these two positions, arguing that there is some truth to the positive effect of the profit motive, but that market forces alone are not enough to eliminate employment and earnings disparities. Cherry surveys the political and economic forces that influenced labor market practices in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on the employment barriers African Americans, women, and immigrants encounter. He then assesses the effects of 1960s civil rights legislation and finds that improvements have been substantial, primarily for college-educated African Americans and women; therefore, he recommends that equal employment opportunity policies be strengthened. Cherry demonstrates how the promotion of full employment can further the advancement of working-class African Americans and women.

Race Relations

Race Relations

Author: Jitsuichi Masuoka Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/06/2020

This is a collection of nineteen essays on race relations at mid-century, written in honor of the late Robert E. Park. Park left import sociological concepts that still stand the test of time--folk or sacred versus modern or secular society, racial frontiers, social distance, the marginal man, racial conflict, and racial movement. The contributors came directly under Park's influence either as students or colleagues. Originally published in 1961. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Race Against Time

Race Against Time

Author: Jack E. Davis Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/06/2020

While many studies of race relations have focused on the black experience, Race against Time strives to unravel the emotional and cultural foundations of race in the white mind. Jack E. Davis combed primary documents in Natchez, Mississippi, and absorbed the town's oral history to understand white racial attitudes there over the past seven decades, a period rich in social change, strife, and reconciliation. What he found in this community that cultivates for profit a romantic view of the Old South challenges conventional assumptions about racial prejudice. Davis engagingly and effortlessly weaves between nineteenth and twentieth centuries, white observations and black, to describe patterns of social interaction in Natchez in the workplace, education, politics, religion, and daily life. It was not, he discovers, false notions of biological differences reinforced by class and economic conflict that lay at the heart of the town's racial divide but rather the perception of a black/white cultural divergence -- in values in education, work, and family. White culture was deemed superior, a presumption manifested through a hierarchy of old-family elite and other white citizens. Since 1930, Natchez has developed a major tourist industry, downsized sharecropping, expanded its manufacturing sector, and participated in the struggles for civil rights, school desegregation, and black political empowerment. Yet the collective white perception of a mythic past has continued, reinforced through the sum of Natchez's public history -- social memory, school textbooks, breathtaking antebellum mansions, and world-famous Pilgrimage. In Race against Time, Davis sensitively lays bare the need for shared control of the town's history and the acknowledgment of intercultural dependence to effect true racial equality. Building upon the 1941 classic Deep South: A Social Anthropological Study of Caste and Class, Davis brings tremendous passion and insight to the demanding issue of race as he fathoms the contours of Natchez's distinctive racial dynamics in recent decades.

John Lafarge and the Limits of Catholic Interracialism, 1911-1963

John Lafarge and the Limits of Catholic Interracialism, 1911-1963

Author: David W. Southern Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/06/2020

Before Vatican II, before the race riots of the 1940s, the white Jesuit priest John Lafarge decried America's treatment of blacks. In the first scholarly biography of Lafarge, David W. Southern paints a portrait of a man ahead of his church on the race issue who nevertheless did not press hard enough in ridding it of an institutional bias against African-Americans. Southern follows Lafarge from his birth into the Social Register in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1880, to his death in 1963, just months after his participation in the March on Washington. According to Southern, Lafarge was the foremost Catholic spokesman on black-white relations in America for more than thirty years. In a series of books and articles, he served on the staff of the influential Jesuit weekly America from 1926 until his death, he significantly improved the image of the Church in the eyes of black, Jewish, and Protestant leaders. In 1934 he founded the Catholic Interracial Council of New York, the most important Catholic civil rights organisation in the pre-Brown era. His declaration in 1937 that racism is a sin and a heresy so impressed the pope that he employed Lafarge to write an encyclical on the subject. Although lauded in his time for his achievements in race relations, Lafarge, Southern contends, espoused too gradualist an approach. Southern maintains that Lafarge was fettered by a fierce loyalty to the Church, a staunch clericalism, an intense concern with the image of Catholicism in Protestant America, an aristocratic background, and Eurocentric thinking, producing in him an abiding paternalism and lingering ambivalence about black culture, and a tendency to conceal the Church's discriminatory practices rather than reveal them. Moreover, he was too slow to condemn segregation and approve the nonviolent direct action of Martin Luther King, Jr. Still, Southern sees in Lafarge a redeeming capacity for liberal growth, citing his inspiration of a younger, more militant generation of Catholics and his joining in the 1963 march. Based on extensive archival research, John LaFarge and the Limits of Catholic Interracialism fills a serious gap in Catholic social history and race-relations history. An impressive, engrossing biography, it also casts light on the broader historical issues of the Church's attitudes and practices toward African-Americans since the Civil War, Catholic liberalism before Vatican II, and the seeds of unrest that manifest themselves today in the rapidly growing black Catholic community.