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Social discrimination & inequality

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social discrimination & inequality category. Presented with a red border are the Social discrimination & inequality books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social discrimination & inequality books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work European Countries' Perspectives

Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work European Countries' Perspectives

Author: Joana Vassilopoulou Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/08/2019

The sixth volume of International Perspectives on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion addresses workplace discrimination of ethnic minority people and migrants in Europe. Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work analyses perspectives from nine countries: France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Italy, Cyprus and Greece. Each country-focused chapter examines the historical context surrounding diversity, equality, racism and discrimination, along with facts and statistics about ethnicity in society and at work. Chapters then investigate the discourse and measures deployed at the national and organisational levels to combat race discrimination and their effects, and each provides a country-specific case study. The book concludes with a reflection on the development of equality legislation in the EU and its impact on racial equality at the workplace. This volume constitutes a cooperative effort to shed light on the management of ethnicity, diversity and migration within the workplace, emphasising the opportunity for improvement within this area. It is an illuminating book for researchers of equality and diversity within organisations, along with stakeholders involved in finding solutions to race and ethnic discrimination at work.

A Terrible Thing to Waste Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind

A Terrible Thing to Waste Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind

Author: Harriet A. Washington Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/08/2019

The 1994 publication of the The Bell Curve and its controversial thesis catapulted the topic of genetic racial differences in IQ to the forefront of renewed and heated debate. Now, in A Terrible Thing to Waste, award-winning science writer Harriet A. Washington adds her incisive analysis to the fray. She takes apart the spurious notion of intelligence as an inherited trait, pointing instead to environmental racism -- a confluence of institutional factors that relegate marginalized communities to living and working near sites of toxic waste, pollution, and urban decay -- as the prime cause of the reported black-white IQ gap. Investigating heavy metals, neurotoxins, deficient prenatal care, bad nutrition, and pathogens as the main factors influencing intelligence, Washington explains why certain communities are so disproportionally affected and what can be done to remedy the problem. Featuring extensive scientific research and Washington's sharp, lively reporting, A Terrible Thing to Waste is sure to outrage, transform the conversation and inspire debate.

A Leftist Critique of the Principles of Identity, Diversity, and Multiculturalism

A Leftist Critique of the Principles of Identity, Diversity, and Multiculturalism

Author: Richard Anderson-Connolly Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/08/2019

Identity politics is a lightning rod in American society. To both its progressive supporters and conservative critics, it is seen as defining the agenda of the Left. Both sides are wrong. Identity politics is not a leftist project. Instead it enables the neoliberal political economy that has caused historic levels of inequality and triggered repression and mass incarceration to deal with the social wreckage. Identity politics is a form of biological essentialism, impeding morality built upon universal humanism and politics built upon solidarity. Unlike the conservative assaults, this book avoids the trivial and silly pronouncements of identity politics (a term generally avoided in the work as loaded and pejorative). It challenges the following key elements of the Identity, Diversity, and Multiculturalism Program: Diversity as Justice-the most important struggle for justice today is increasing the representation throughout society of individuals from historically marginalized groups by ending discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, sexual orientation, and similar characteristics; Colorblindness as Racism-race-neutral solutions to the problems caused by racism are harmful to blacks; Race as Culture-members of different races, specifically blacks and whites in the United States, belong to different cultures; Culture as Virtue-cultures should be respected and celebrated. This book forcefully argues that none of these tenets is-or rather should be-a leftist commitment. For progressives already suspicious of those principles, this work offers a cogent set of responses to the unfounded accusations of racism, sexism, and so on that frequently restrict critical discussion of the topic. For progressives who accept the principles, it poses a challenge: How do you defend them from a leftist critique, one that does not deny the continuing significance of discrimination, rather than from the weaker attacks of the Right? For those on the Right, it represents a threat. The liberal focus on identity allows conservatives to define politics as largely a symbolic project. Once leftists return to their core commitments they will form a powerful movement for political and economic change.

Rethinking Who We Are Critical Reflections on Human Diversity in Canada

Rethinking Who We Are Critical Reflections on Human Diversity in Canada

Author: Jessica Pulis Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/2019

Rethinking Who We Are takes a non-conventional approach to understanding human difference in Canada. Contributors to this volume critically re-examine Canadian identity by rethinking who we are and what we are becoming by scrutinizing the totality of difference. Included are analyses on the macro differences among Canadians, such as the disparities produced from unequal treatment under Canadian law, human rights legislation and health care. Contributors also explore the diversities that are often treated in a non-traditional manner on the bases of gender, class, sexuality, disAbility and Indigeniety. Finally, the ways in which difference is treated in Canada's legal system, literature and the media are explored with an aim to challenge existing orthodoxy and push readers to critically examine their beliefs and ideas, particularly in an age where divisive, racist and xenophobic politics and attitudes are resurfacing.

Cultural Critique 101

Cultural Critique 101

Author: Cesare Casarino Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/07/2019

Reproductive Injustice Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth

Reproductive Injustice Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth

Author: Dana-Ain Davis Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/06/2019

A troubling study of the role that medical racism plays in the lives of black women who have given birth to premature and low birth weight infants Black women have higher rates of premature birth than other women in America. This cannot be simply explained by economic factors, with poorer women lacking resources or access to care. Even professional, middle-class black women are at a much higher risk of premature birth than low-income white women in the United States. Dana-Ain Davis looks into this phenomenon, placing racial differences in birth outcomes into a historical context, revealing that ideas about reproduction and race today have been influenced by the legacy of ideas which developed during the era of slavery. While poor and low-income black women are often the mascots of premature birth outcomes, this book focuses on professional black women, who are just as likely to give birth prematurely. Drawing on an impressive array of interviews with nearly fifty mothers, fathers, neonatologists, nurses, midwives, and reproductive justice advocates, Dana-Ain Davis argues that events leading up to an infant's arrival in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and the parents' experiences while they are in the NICU, reveal subtle but pernicious forms of racism that confound the perceived class dynamics that are frequently understood to be a central factor of premature birth. The book argues not only that medical racism persists and must be considered when examining adverse outcomes-as well as upsetting experiences for parents-but also that NICUs and life-saving technologies should not be the only strategies for improving the outcomes for black pregnant women and their babies. Davis makes the case for other avenues, such as community-based birthing projects, doulas, and midwives, that support women during pregnancy and labor are just as important and effective in avoiding premature births and mortality.

Reproductive Injustice Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth

Reproductive Injustice Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth

Author: Dana-Ain Davis Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/06/2019

A troubling study of the role that medical racism plays in the lives of black women who have given birth to premature and low birth weight infants Black women have higher rates of premature birth than other women in America. This cannot be simply explained by economic factors, with poorer women lacking resources or access to care. Even professional, middle-class black women are at a much higher risk of premature birth than low-income white women in the United States. Dana-Ain Davis looks into this phenomenon, placing racial differences in birth outcomes into a historical context, revealing that ideas about reproduction and race today have been influenced by the legacy of ideas which developed during the era of slavery. While poor and low-income black women are often the mascots of premature birth outcomes, this book focuses on professional black women, who are just as likely to give birth prematurely. Drawing on an impressive array of interviews with nearly fifty mothers, fathers, neonatologists, nurses, midwives, and reproductive justice advocates, Dana-Ain Davis argues that events leading up to an infant's arrival in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and the parents' experiences while they are in the NICU, reveal subtle but pernicious forms of racism that confound the perceived class dynamics that are frequently understood to be a central factor of premature birth. The book argues not only that medical racism persists and must be considered when examining adverse outcomes-as well as upsetting experiences for parents-but also that NICUs and life-saving technologies should not be the only strategies for improving the outcomes for black pregnant women and their babies. Davis makes the case for other avenues, such as community-based birthing projects, doulas, and midwives, that support women during pregnancy and labor are just as important and effective in avoiding premature births and mortality.

What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Inequality?

What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Inequality?

Author: Mike Brewer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 17/06/2019

What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Inequality? is part of a new book series offering short, up-to-date overviews of key issues often misrepresented or simplified in the mainstream media. In this book, Professor Mike Brewer discusses What We Know about economic inequalities in the UK, presenting new analysis of the top 1% and 0.1% in the UK, and summarising the causes and consequences of high levels of inequality. Brewer answers the following questions: Why is curbing inequality now regarded as a global challenge? Why did the UK become more unequal during the 1980s? What has happened to incomes since the financial crash in 2008 and the government austerity that followed? How relevant is Thomas Piketty's prediction that growing wealth inequalities will return us to levels of inequality last seen at the dawn of the twentieth century? The author concludes by suggesting What We Should Do to move the UK off its high-inequality path, including further taxation, wealth redistribution and welfare reform. Intended for anyone seeking a quick and authoritative understanding of inequality in the modern era. Series Editor: Professor Chris Grey, Royal Holloway, University of London

What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Inequality?

What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Inequality?

Author: Mike Brewer Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/06/2019

What Do We Know and What Should We Do About Inequality? is part of a new book series offering short, up-to-date overviews of key issues often misrepresented or simplified in the mainstream media. In this book, Professor Mike Brewer discusses What We Know about economic inequalities in the UK, presenting new analysis of the top 1% and 0.1% in the UK, and summarising the causes and consequences of high levels of inequality. Brewer answers the following questions: Why is curbing inequality now regarded as a global challenge? Why did the UK become more unequal during the 1980s? What has happened to incomes since the financial crash in 2008 and the government austerity that followed? How relevant is Thomas Piketty's prediction that growing wealth inequalities will return us to levels of inequality last seen at the dawn of the twentieth century? The author concludes by suggesting What We Should Do to move the UK off its high-inequality path, including further taxation, wealth redistribution and welfare reform. Intended for anyone seeking a quick and authoritative understanding of inequality in the modern era. Series Editor: Professor Chris Grey, Royal Holloway, University of London

When Stereotype Meets Prejudice - Antiziganism in European Societies

When Stereotype Meets Prejudice - Antiziganism in European Societies

Author: Timofey Agarin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/06/2019

Antiziganism is a widespread phenomenon in all European societies. Poor or rich, 'postcommunist' or 'traditional', North or South, with 'lean' or 'thick' welfare systems?all European societies demonstrate antiziganist prejudice. All across Europe Romanis are among the poorest, most destitute, and most excluded communities. Widespread prejudice and stereotypical representations of Romani individuals limit their chances for participation in democratic decision making processes and their access to services. Unable to counteract majority stereotypes systematically, more often than not they remain on the fringes of society. This edited volume asks where these stereotypes and prejudices come from, why they are ubiquitous to all societies, and how pertinent their impact on antiziganist attitudes found in European societies really is.

African Nationalism from Apartheid to Post-Apart - A Critical Analysis of ANC Party Political Discourse

African Nationalism from Apartheid to Post-Apart - A Critical Analysis of ANC Party Political Discourse

Author: Ellen Wesemuller Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/06/2019

With the help of discourse analysis and ideology critique, Ellen Wesemuller establishes a theoretical framework to analyze African nationalism in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. Following the constructivist school of thought, the study adopts the assumption that nations are imagined communities which are built on invented traditions . It shows that historically and analytically, there are two distinct concepts of nationalism: constitutional and ethnic nationalism. These concepts can be retraced in South Africa where they form the central antagonism of black political thought. The study of post-apartheid African nationalism is placed in its historical perspective by focusing on the major milestones of African National Congress' discourse before and during apartheid. It demonstrates that throughout its history, the ANC was characterized by the rivalry between concepts of constitutional and ethnic nationalism. While the former concept found its counterpart in Charterism, the latter was adopted by African nationalism. Though the ANC in its majority embraced Charterism, it continually played with the appeal of an exclusive, racial nationalism. The theoretical and historical contextualization of the book allows for the investigation of the various dimensions of current ANC discourse on African nationalism. Wesemuller analyses different concepts of nationalism employed by the ANC and compares these models to those discussed in academic literature. She concludes that in post-apartheid South Africa, the historical dichotomy of Africanist and Charterist nationalism persists within the ANC. While early concepts of nationalism like Mandela's rainbow nation and Mbeki's I am an African paid tribute to Charterism, the discourses on the African Renaissance and Mbeki's two-nation address at least leave openings for Africanist interpretations. Furthermore, the analysis shows that nationalism is not only a product of discourse but also one of material conditions. The study provides evidence that it is not only the ANC that hijacks African nationalism in order to mobilize their electorate and push through unpopular policy choices. Also, there are compelling material reasons for some South Africans to adopt a nationalist agenda. This is demonstrated by the new black bourgeoisie that mediates the gap between rich and poor as well as black and white. African nationalism in this regard serves to legitimate domination and existing relations of inequality. It affirms an African elite while neither uplifting the majority of African poor nor threatening the material privileges of white South Africans. Lastly, Ellen Wesemuller gives an outlook on the political implications of a resurrected nationalism. The effects can be analyzed according to the two promises of nationalism: superiority over outsiders and equality between insiders . Superiority in post-apartheid South Africa is established over other African countries, immigrants and inner South African groups that are considered foreign .