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Housing & homelessness

See below for a selection of the latest books from Housing & homelessness category. Presented with a red border are the Housing & homelessness books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Housing & homelessness books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Homelessness An Annotated Bibliography

Homelessness An Annotated Bibliography

Author: James M. Henslin Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/03/1993

First published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Gimme Shelter A Social History of Homelessness in Contemporary America

Gimme Shelter A Social History of Homelessness in Contemporary America

Author: Gregg Barak Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/1992

According to current projections, the number of homeless in the United States will continue to swell in the 1990s unless more aggressive efforts to combat the problem are initiated. Based upon a thorough analysis of the underlying social and political causes of homelessness in this country, this study takes a hard look at the realities and misconceptions that surround the victims. Gregg Barak demonstrates how current public service programs inadequately address the issue, and proposes governmental policy changes that could prove beneficial. In an effort to dispel the myths that stereotype the homeless, this study places their plight within the continuing domestic and worldwide economic emergency and defines their demographics according to such factors as age, sex, race, health, and education. Barak's subsequent focus on the violence and criminality associated with the condition and treatment of the homeless uncovers controversial issues of injustice and constitutionality, and aims the discussion toward possible solutions for this burgeoning problem.

Moving to Nowhere Children's Stories of Homelessness

Moving to Nowhere Children's Stories of Homelessness

Author: Mary E. Walsh Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/03/1992

The number of homeless families in the United States continues to increase at an alarming rate. There is little doubt that becoming homeless and living in shelters has had significant effects on the lives of the children in these families. While many empirical studies have documented the effects of homelessness on one or another aspect of children's lives, Moving To Nowhere looks at the experience of losing one's home and living in a shelter from the perspective of the child. Children who are homeless tell their own story. They speak of life in a shelter as they have known it. It is through these stories that human service professionals can come to see homelessness as the children themselves see it and can learn what living in a shelter is like. Children who are homeless tell their own story. They describe how they became homeless, why they think it happened to their family, what their expectations and concerns were as they realized they would be moving to a shelter, and what the shelter was like when they arrived. They speak often of missing their old neighborhoods, their friends, and their extended family. They report their fears, their worries about their family's future, the absence of money and resources, and, for some, the presence of violence or substance abuse in their families. They repeatedly tell of their embarrassment about being homeless; this profoundly colors their relationships to friends, schoolmates, and teachers. And, in each of their stories, these children provide clear and moving examples of how they manage to survive on a day to day basis while they wait for permanent housing. Health care professionals, psychologists, and teachers, as well as students and the general public, will find this work poignant and instructive.

Moving to Nowhere Children's Stories of Homelessness

Moving to Nowhere Children's Stories of Homelessness

Author: Mary E. Walsh Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/03/1992

The number of homeless families in the United States continues to increase at an alarming rate. There is little doubt that becoming homeless and living in shelters has had significant effects on the lives of the children in these families. While many empirical studies have documented the effects of homelessness on one or another aspect of children's lives, Moving To Nowhere looks at the experience of losing one's home and living in a shelter from the perspective of the child. Children who are homeless tell their own story. They speak of life in a shelter as they have known it. It is through these stories that human service professionals can come to see homelessness as the children themselves see it and can learn what living in a shelter is like. Children who are homeless tell their own story. They describe how they became homeless, why they think it happened to their family, what their expectations and concerns were as they realized they would be moving to a shelter, and what the shelter was like when they arrived. They speak often of missing their old neighborhoods, their friends, and their extended family. They report their fears, their worries about their family's future, the absence of money and resources, and, for some, the presence of violence or substance abuse in their families. They repeatedly tell of their embarrassment about being homeless; this profoundly colors their relationships to friends, schoolmates, and teachers. And, in each of their stories, these children provide clear and moving examples of how they manage to survive on a day to day basis while they wait for permanent housing. Health care professionals, psychologists, and teachers, as well as students and the general public, will find this work poignant and instructive.

Over the Edge Growth of Homelessness in the 1980's

Over the Edge Growth of Homelessness in the 1980's

Author: Martha Burt Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/1992

Silent Sisters An Ethnography Of Homeless Women

Silent Sisters An Ethnography Of Homeless Women

Author: Betty G. Russell Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/06/1991

First Published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Gimme Shelter A Social History of Homelessness in Contemporary America

Gimme Shelter A Social History of Homelessness in Contemporary America

Author: Gregg Barak Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/04/1991

According to current projections, the number of homeless in the United States will continue to swell in the 1990s unless more aggressive efforts to combat the problem are initiated. Based upon a thorough analysis of the underlying social and political causes of homelessness in this country, this study takes a hard look at the realities and misconceptions that surround the victims. Gregg Barak demonstrates how current public service programs inadequately address the issue, and proposes governmental policy changes that could prove beneficial. In an effort to dispel the myths that stereotype the homeless, this study places their plight within the continuing domestic and worldwide economic emergency and defines their demographics according to such factors as age, sex, race, health, and education. Barak's subsequent focus on the violence and criminality associated with the condition and treatment of the homeless uncovers controversial issues of injustice and constitutionality, and aims the discussion toward possible solutions for this burgeoning problem.

Persistent Poverty The American Dream Turned Nightmare

Persistent Poverty The American Dream Turned Nightmare

Author: Richard H. Ropers Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/04/1991

Once heralded as the land of opportunity, America has become, for increasing numbers of her inhabitants, a nation of disappointment and hardship. In a land characterized by innumerable economic, environmental and social problems, poverty is escalating to the point where approximately one-third of the population is composed of the poor and the near poor. Persistent Poverty provides a comprehensive and critical analysis of one of America's most disturbing social problems.In a clear, uncompromising style, Richard H. Ropers, Ph.D., a noted authority on the plight of the poverty-stricken, unravels a skein of government inconsistencies in handling the mounting effects of poverty, homelessness, the welfare system, and the gradual polarization of our class system, resulting in the gradual erosion of the middle class. After examining various blame-the-victim and blame the system theories of inequality, Dr. Ropers asserts that such poverty results primarily from long-term economic, social, and political policies and is not necessarily derived from the supposed deviant behavior of the poor.With a staggering 70 million Americans living just above or below the poverty line, the author advises that urgent attention be paid to the structural roots of poverty in light of significant increases in the rate of crime, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse, domestic violence, and unemployment. As an objective focus on the enormous scope of poverty, this groundbreaking work offers keen insights into the argument that despite substantial efforts to alleviate similar plights worldwide, the United States cannot provide sufficient care for her own impoverished citizens.Sociologists, educators, politicians, urbanologists, public officials, and concerned citizens will all benefit from this provocative and thoughtful appraisal.

Down and Out in America Origins of Homelessness

Down and Out in America Origins of Homelessness

Author: Peter H. Rossi Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/02/1991

The most accurate and comprehensive picture of homelessness to date, this study offers a powerful explanation of its causes, proposes short- and long-term solutions, and documents the striking contrasts between the homeless of the 1950s and 1960s and the contemporary homeless population, which is younger and contains more women, children, and blacks.

At Risk of Homelessness The Roles of Income and Rent

At Risk of Homelessness The Roles of Income and Rent

Author: Karin Ringheim Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/1990

This volume represents a new theoretical and empirical approach to the study of homelessness. Rather than focusing on the behavioral characteristics and social deviance of the homeless themselves, the incomes, rents, and demographic characteristics of a population of renters who may be at risk of homelessness are examined. Based on a study in four U.S. metropolitan areas of changes over an eight year period in the stock of low-cost rental housing and the need of low-income households for affordable housing, Karin Ringheim contends that the extent of homelessness in individual areas is not simply related to the extent of poverty in those areas. Rather, she argues, the increase in the number and change in composition of the homeless population is a direct result of the severity of the housing squeeze and the demographic characteristics of those most vulnerable to housing loss. Among the issues the study addresses are the mismatch between available rental housing stock and what would be affordable to the low income population, changes in the cost and quality of rental housing over time, and changes in the demographic characteristics of increasingly vulnerable renters. Following an introductory chapter, Ringheim proposes a theory of structural change and discusses the two most prominent competing theories of homelessness. She develops the criteria used to select the the four metropolitan areas that form the focus of the study: Baltimore, Houston, Chicago, and Seattle. After describing the data and methodology used in the study, the author devotes a chapter to background and analysis of each of the metropolitan areas individually. A separate chapter explores the relationship between the quality and price of rental housing, while the final chapter summarizes the findings and discusses their policy implications. In addition to demonstrating that the increase in the homeless population has been accompanied by a decrease in the supply of low-cost rental housing and an increase in the demand for it, Ringheim shows that both supply and affordability have been adversely affected by changes in federal policy during the 1980s, suggesting that these changes are directly linked to the increase in homelessness. Sociologists, economists, urban planners, and public policy makers involved in seeking solutions to the growing problem of homelessness, as well as those concerned with housing and tenure, will find this volume insightful and informative.

A Street Is Not a Home

A Street Is Not a Home

Author: Robert C. Coates Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/11/1990

Homelessness in the United States Data and Issues

Homelessness in the United States Data and Issues

Author: Jamshid A. Momeni, Lee C., III Barrett, Gerald R. Garrett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/03/1990

This is the second of Momeni's two-volume series on homelessness in the United States. While volume I concentrated on the statewide distribution, variations, trends, and characteristics of the homeless population, the present volume addresses the problem of data collection and specific causes and issues that relate to homelessness. Unique in its attempt to bring systematic data and analysis to bear on the subject, this groundbreaking study focuses upon such critical areas as drug abuse among the homeless, the housing situation that gives rise to homelessness, homeless children, food sources, and problems of employment. Although the contributors approach the topic from a number of different perspectives, they are united in their conclusion that realistic solutions to the problem of homelessness rest not in establishing new and dramatic programs, but rather in forging links between government and private agencies to create a system-wide response to the multiple needs of the homeless population. In addition to exploring the serious and persistent problems homeless people face, the contributors highlight the difficulties inherent in measuring the extent of homelessness accurately, concluding that efforts to do so are likely to produce an undercount. A number of chapters provide a clearer picture of the homeless population in America by examining both the socioeconomic and demographic correlates and the social-psychiatric dimensions of homelessness. Finally, the contributors compare and contrast the characteristics of homelessness and the methods of dealing with the problem in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. Two concluding essays provide an overview of homelessness on the national level and propose public policies likely to be most effective in reducing homelessness. Numerous tables and figures illustrate points made in the text. Students of social sciences, social practitioners, and public policymakers will find Homelessness in America provocative reading, and a reliable source of data and analysis.