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Biblical studies & exegesis

See below for a selection of the latest books from Biblical studies & exegesis category. Presented with a red border are the Biblical studies & exegesis books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Biblical studies & exegesis books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

In the Beginning An Economist Reads the Book of Genesis

In the Beginning An Economist Reads the Book of Genesis

Author: Luigino Bruni Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/09/2019

This unique book offers an in-depth commentary on the Book of Genesis from an economic and anthropological point of view. Whilst the text appears to follow the Jewish and Christian tradition of bible commentary, it uniquely intertwines theological vision with explorations of the ethical, economics and social experiences depicted within the bible's stories. The book follows the characteristic attitude of Jewish and Christian practices in commenting on the Bible from the original standpoint of economics. From the creation of Adam and Eve, to Joseph's arrival in the house of Potiphar in Egypt, the chapters systematically examine well-known stories and parables to illuminate new parallels with our own time. Through this economist's interpretation, readers will see how money and profit can be presented as being synonymous with love and life; that the first angel of the Bible was sent to console a servant; and that the word `profit' made its debut when Joseph was sold into slavery. This highly informative and thought-provoking work will appeal to theologians, philosophers, professional economists and those interested in religious studies.

Scribes and Their Remains

Scribes and Their Remains

Author: Craig A. (Acadia Divinity College, Canada) Evans Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

Scribes and Their Remains begins with an introductory essay by Stanley Porter which addresses the principal theme of the book: the text as artifact. The rest of the volume is then split into two major sections. In the first, five studies appear on the theme of `Scribes, Letters, and Literacy.' In the first of these Craig A. Evans offers a lengthy piece that argues that the archaeological, artifactual, and historical evidence suggests that New Testament autographs and first copies may well have remained in circulation for one century or more, having the effect of stabilizing the text. Other pieces in the section address literacy, orality and paleography of early Christian papyri. In the second section there are five pieces on `Writing, Reading, and Abbreviating Christian Scripture.' These range across numerous topics, including an examination of the stauros (cross) as a nomen sacrum. The volume concludes with reflections by co-editor Peter Arzt-Grabner incorporating his longstanding expertise in the study of documentary papyri, especially as these ancient documents relate to New Testament research. From the perspective of a papyrologist, Arzt-Grabner discusses how New Testament scholars use documentary papyri today and recommends some future directions.

Hidden Criticism of the Angry Tyrant in Early Judaism and the Acts of the Apostles

Hidden Criticism of the Angry Tyrant in Early Judaism and the Acts of the Apostles

Author: Drew J. Strait, David P. Moessner Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2019

Hidden Criticism of the Angry Tyrant in Early Judaism and the Acts of the Apostles adds to the current literature of imperial-critical New Testament readings with an examination of Luke's hidden criticism of imperial Rome in the Acts of the Apostles and in Paul's speech on the Areopagus in Acts 17. Focusing on discursive resistance in the Hellenistic world, Strait examines the relationship between hidden criticism and persuasion and between subordinates and the powerful, and he explores the challenge to the dissident voice to communicate criticism while under surveillance. Strait argues that Luke confronts the idolatrous power and iconic spectacle of gods and kings with the Gospel of the Lord of all-a worldview that is incompatible with the religions of Rome, including emperor worship.

Signs, Wonders, and Gifts Divination in the Letters of Paul

Signs, Wonders, and Gifts Divination in the Letters of Paul

Author: Jennifer (Assistant Professor of Religion, Tufts University) Eyl Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/08/2019

In much of the scholarship on Paul, activities such as speaking in tongues, prophecy, and miracle healings are either ignored or treated as singular occurrences. Typically, these practices are categorized in such a way that shields Paul and his followers from the influence of so-called paganism. In Signs, Wonders, and Gifts, Jennifer Eyl masterfully argues that Paul did, in fact, engage in range of divinatory and wonder-working practices that were widely recognized and accepted across the ancient Mediterranean. Eyl redescribes, reclassifies, and recontextualizes Paul's repertoire vis-a-vis such widespread, similar practices. Situating these activities within the larger framework of reciprocity that dominated human-divine relationships in antiquity, she demonstrates that divine powers and divine communication were bestowed as benefactions toward Paul and his gentile followers in proportion to their faithfulness and loyalty.

Opening Israel's Scriptures

Opening Israel's Scriptures

Opening Israel's Scriptures is a collection of thirty-six essays on the Hebrew Bible, from Genesis to Chronicles, which gives powerful insight into the complexity and inexhaustibility of the Hebrew Scriptures as a theological resource. Based on more than two decades of lectures on Old Testament interpretation, Ellen F. Davis offers a selective yet comprehensive guide to the core concepts, literary patterns, storylines, and theological perspectives that are central to Israel's Scriptures. Underlying the whole study is the primary assumption that each book of the canon has literary and theological coherence, though not uniformity. In both her close readings of individual texts and in her broad demonstrations of the coherence of whole books, Davis models the best practices of contemporary exegesis, integrating the insights of contemporary scholars with those of classical theological resources in Jewish and Christian traditions. Throughout, she keeps an eye to the experiences and concerns of contemporary readers, showing through multiple examples that the critical interpretation of texts is provisional, open-ended work-a collaboration across generations and cultures. Ultimately what she offers is an invitation into the more spacious world that the Bible discloses, which challenges ordinary conceptions of how things really are.

The Bible and Feminism Remapping the Field

The Bible and Feminism Remapping the Field

Author: Yvonne (Professor of Biblical Cultures and Politics, University of Kent) Sherwood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/08/2019

This groundbreaking book breaks with established canons and resists some of the stereotypes of feminist biblical studies. It features a wide range of contributors who showcase new methodological and theoretical movements such as feminist materialisms, intersectionality, postidentitarian 'nomadic' politics, gender archaeology, and lived religion, and theories of the human and the posthuman. The Bible and Feminism: Remapping the Field engages a range of social and political issues, including migration and xenophobia, divorce and family law, abortion, 'pinkwashing', the neoliberal university, the second amendment, AIDS and sexual trafficking, and the politics of 'the veil'. Foundational figures in feminist biblical studies work alongside new voices and contributors from a multitude of disciplines in conversations with the Bible that go well beyond the expected canon-within-the-canon assumed to be of interest to feminist biblical scholars. Moving beyond the limits of a text-orientated model of reading, this collection looks at how biblical texts were actualized in the lives of religious revolutionaries, such as Joanna Southcott or Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. It charts the politics of the Pauline veil in the self-understanding of Europe and reads the 'genealogical halls' in the book of Chronicles alongside acts of commemoration and forgetting in 9/11 and Tiananmen Square.

Opening Israel's Scriptures

Opening Israel's Scriptures

Opening Israel's Scriptures is a collection of thirty-six essays on the Hebrew Bible, from Genesis to Chronicles, which gives powerful insight into the complexity and inexhaustibility of the Hebrew Scriptures as a theological resource. Based on more than two decades of lectures on Old Testament interpretation, Ellen F. Davis offers a selective yet comprehensive guide to the core concepts, literary patterns, storylines, and theological perspectives that are central to Israel's Scriptures. Underlying the whole study is the primary assumption that each book of the canon has literary and theological coherence, though not uniformity. In both her close readings of individual texts and in her broad demonstrations of the coherence of whole books, Davis models the best practices of contemporary exegesis, integrating the insights of contemporary scholars with those of classical theological resources in Jewish and Christian traditions. Throughout, she keeps an eye to the experiences and concerns of contemporary readers, showing through multiple examples that the critical interpretation of texts is provisional, open-ended work-a collaboration across generations and cultures. Ultimately what she offers is an invitation into the more spacious world that the Bible discloses, which challenges ordinary conceptions of how things really are.

The Gentile Mission in Old Testament Citations in Acts Text, Hermeneutic, and Purpose

The Gentile Mission in Old Testament Citations in Acts Text, Hermeneutic, and Purpose

Author: James A. Meek Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

Scholarship on the uses of the Old Testament in Luke-Acts has tended to focus upon the role played by the Old Testament in the development of the author's Christology. James Meek, however, draws out the theme of the Gentile mission in Acts as it relates to the Old Testament, and gives particular attention to four texts:13:47 (Isa 49:6); 15:16-18 (Amos 9:11-12); 2:17-21 (Joel 3:1-5 MT); 3:25 (Gen 22:18). The quotations in Acts 13 and 15 receive greater attention because they explicitly address the issue of the Gentile mission (the two earlier texts anticipate it) and because of particular interpretive questions raised by these texts. Meek argues that while there are similarities in the quotations in Acts with the Old Greek form of the cited texts, the argument never depends on distinctive readings of the Old Greek. He therefore rejects claims that the author's use of Old Testament texts is dependent entirely on the Old Greek. He also maintains that all four quotations are used in a manner consistent with their sense in their original contexts, contrary to the common assertion that the New Testament commonly cites Old Testament texts without regard for original sense or context. His third principal argument is that these Old Testament quotations function as proof from prophecy, contrary to the argument of some. In particular, they are cited to demonstrate the legitimacy of the Gentile mission as conducted by the early church and of the Gentiles' place among the people of God, showing these ideas to be central to the author's purpose.

Saint Thomas the Apostle: New Testament, Apocrypha, and Historical Traditions

Saint Thomas the Apostle: New Testament, Apocrypha, and Historical Traditions

Author: Johnson (Union Biblical Seminary, India) Thomaskutty Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

Are the Thomas references in the Gospel of John, the Thomas compositions, and the early Thomas traditions in northwestern and southern India purely legendary as biblical scholars have assumed or do they preserve unexamined historical traditions intermittently as the Thomas Christians in India have believed? Didymus Judas Thomas is one of the most misunderstood characters from the beginning of the New Testament history and interpretation. In this study, Thomaskutty addresses the following questions: whether Thomas was merely a `doubting Thomas' or a `genuine Thomas'? Can we understand Thomas comprehensively by bringing the New Testament, apocrypha, and historical traditions together? How was Thomas connected to eastern Christianity and how does the Thomas literature support/not support this connectivity? Can we understand the Thomas traditions related to Judea, Syria, and India with the help of canonical, extra canonical, and traditio-historical documents? Thomaskutty investigates the development of the Thomas literature right from the beginning, examining and questioning the approaches and methodologies that have been employed in interpreting these documents, and analyzes the Thomas literature closely in order to understand the character, his mission involvements, and the possible implications this may have for understanding early Christianity in the east.

Jesus' Cry From the Cross Towards a First-Century Understanding of the Intertextual Relationship between Psalm 22 and the Narrative of Mark's Gospel

Jesus' Cry From the Cross Towards a First-Century Understanding of the Intertextual Relationship between Psalm 22 and the Narrative of Mark's Gospel

Author: Holly J. Carey Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

Using a multi-level approach to Mark 15:34, and contra to the opinion of the majority of Markan scholarship, a contextual reading of Ps 22:2 does not serve to negate or dilute the presentation of Jesus as one in distress. Rather, such a reading enhances this aspect of his death by underscoring his identity as a Righteous Sufferer who experiences suffering but has the promise of vindication. The evidence that supports a contextual reading of the citation in the Markan narrative includes: (a) the importance of Jesus' impending resurrection/vindication and its foreshadowing; (b) the relatively consistent contextual use of the scriptures in the narrative prior to Mark 15:34; (c) the patterns of the textual and liturgical use of the psalms and the presence of the motif of the Righteous Sufferer in Mark's socio-cultural milieu; (d) the presentation of Jesus as the Righteous Sufferer throughout the narrative; and (e) an exegesis of Mark 15:34 and the surrounding Markan passion-resurrection narrative with regard to the function of Ps 22 in the story of Jesus' death and resurrection. A test case of this argument is undertaken at the close of the book, when both Matthew and Luke's treatment of Ps 22 and other Righteous Sufferer language is considered, regarding their readings of Ps 22 in Mark as the earliest tangible evidence of the interpretation of this passage in his gospel.

'The Sufferings of Christ Are Abundant In Us' A Narrative Dynamics Investigation of Paul's Sufferings in 2 Corinthians

'The Sufferings of Christ Are Abundant In Us' A Narrative Dynamics Investigation of Paul's Sufferings in 2 Corinthians

Author: Kar Yong Lim Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

This study investigates why Paul makes the theme of suffering so central to his argument in 2 Corinthians. It is pursued through an exegetical analysis of passages where Paul's suffering is described, namely 1:3-11; 2:14-116; 4:7-12; 6:1-10 and 11:23-12:10. By employing a narrative approach, this study argues that Paul's apostolic suffering is grounded in the story of Jesus. There are several implications arising from this approach. First, Paul understands his suffering as necessary and integral to his apostolic mission. Second, Paul claims that his suffering has positive missiological benefits, resulting in giving birth to the Christ-believing community in Corinth. Third, for Paul, the story of Jesus does not end at the event of the cross, and so he extends the invitation to the Corinthians to participate in the story of Jesus. Fourth, Paul's understanding of his suffering also finds its roots in the Hebrew Scriptures as seen in the allusion to and citations of Isaiah and Jeremiah/1 Kingdoms. Finally, Paul expresses his deep concern for the Corinthians in this letter. In essence, Paul sees his own suffering as a reflection of his embodying the ongoing story of Jesus - a story of suffering and death leading to life - and calls the Corinthians also to this cruciform pattern of living. Taking all the above implications together, it is suggested that 2 Corinthians should be read as primarily parenaetic in nature and that Paul's apology for his apostleship only plays a secondary role.