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Ethics & moral philosophy

See below for a selection of the latest books from Ethics & moral philosophy category. Presented with a red border are the Ethics & moral philosophy books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Ethics & moral philosophy books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Birth of Ethics Reconstructing the Role and Nature of Morality

The Birth of Ethics Reconstructing the Role and Nature of Morality

Imagine a human society, perhaps in pre-history, in which people were generally of a psychological kind with us, had the use of natural language to communicate with one another, but did not have any properly moral concepts in which to exhort one another to meet certain standards and to lodge related claims and complaints. According to The Birth of Ethics, the members of that society would have faced a set of pressures, and made a series of adjustments in response, sufficient to put them within reach of ethical concepts. Without any planning, they would have more or less inevitably evolved a way of using such concepts to articulate desirable patterns of behavior and to hold themselves and one another responsible to those standards. Sooner or later, they would have entered ethical space. While this central claim is developed as a thesis in conjectural history or genealogy, the aim of the exercise is philosophical. Assuming that it explains the emergence of concepts and practices that are more or less equivalent to ours, the story offers us an account of the nature and role of morality. It directs us to the function that ethics plays in human life and alerts us to the character in virtue of which it can serve that function. The emerging view of morality has implications for the standard range of questions in meta-ethics and moral psychology, and enables us to understand why there are divisions in normative ethics like that between consequentialist and Kantian approaches.

Moral Neuroeducation for a Democratic and Pluralistic Society

Moral Neuroeducation for a Democratic and Pluralistic Society

Author: Patrici Calvo Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/12/2019

This book brings together a group of top scholars on ethics and moral neuroeducation to cover the specific field of moral learning. Although there are many studies on neural bases of human learning and the application processes in different fields of human activity, such as education, economics or politics, very few of them have delved into the specific field of moral learning. This book brings forward a discursive and cordial ethical concept suitable for the theoretical-practical development of moral neuroeducation, as well as a set of guidelines for the design of an educational model that, based on moral neuroeducation, contributes to the resolution of social problems and the eradication of undesirable patterns and behaviors such as hate speech, corruption, intolerance, nepotism, aporophobia or xenophobia. Furthermore it contains a management approach for the application of this educational model to the different areas of activity involved in social and human development. A must read for students, educators and researchers in the field of moral philosophy, (applied) ethics ethics and any other discipline working with reciprocity (economics, politics, health, etc.).

Thought Work Thinking, Action, and the Fate of the World

Thought Work Thinking, Action, and the Fate of the World

Author: Elizabeth K. Minnich Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/12/2019

Thinking has, for many of us, become as passive as breathing. While it's essential to our very existence, we devote little energy or time to cultivating it. Thought Work: Thinking, Action, and the Fate of the World challenges us to reinstate the restless, complicated activity of thinking as the heart of all education and professional work. Distinguished philosopher Elizabeth Minnich and evaluation studies pioneer Michael Patton gather a diverse cast of thought leaders to respond to the dilemma presented by Minnich's book The Evil of Banality: On the Life and Death Importance of Thinking. Our underappreciation of careful thought has crippled our ability to sustain a moral, conscience-driven society. It now falls to each of us to examine the underlying thought processes that guide our every action. From systems and strategic thinking, entrepreneurial thinking, and critical and evaluative thinking, to ethical and philosophical thinking and thinking grounded in and informed by the humanities and community organizing, this volume unpacks vital creative processes and develops schema to support increased thought-training in and across individual professions. Together, the contributed thought works of this volume will empower students, scholars, and professionals in any field to reignite their dedicated, thoughtful progress towards long-term conscience-driven goals. This book is a call to practice the arts of thinking in daily, professional, imaginative, logical, and above all reflective ways so we are able to evaluate, to judge, and to make choices responsively and responsibly. Such thinking is not only life enhancing-it is life preserving.

Social Work Ethics From the Classroom to the Field

Social Work Ethics From the Classroom to the Field

Author: James A. Marley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/11/2019

Minding the Gap Moral Ideals and Moral Improvement

Minding the Gap Moral Ideals and Moral Improvement

Most of us care about being a good person. Most of us also recognize that we fall far short of our morals aspirations, that there is a gap between what we are like and what we think we should be like. The aim of moral improvement is to narrow that gap. And yet as a practical undertaking, moral improvement is beset by difficulties. We are not very good judges of what we are like and we are often unclear about what it would mean to be better. This book aims to give an honest account of moral improvement that takes seriously the challenges that we encounter-the practical and philosophical-in trying to make ourselves morally better. Ethical theories routinely present us with accounts of ideal moral agents that we are supposed to emulate. These accounts, however, often lack normative authority for us and they may also fail to provide us with adequate guidance about how to live in our flawed moral reality. Stohr presents moral improvement as a project for non-ideal persons living in non-ideal circumstances. An adequate account of moral improvement must have psychologically plausible starting points and rely on ideals that are normatively authoritative and regulatively efficacious for the person trying to emulate them. Moral improvement should be understood as the project of articulating and inhabiting an aspirational moral identity. That identity is cultivated through existing practical identities and standpoints, which are fundamentally social and which generate practical conflicts about how to live. The success of moral improvement depends on it taking place within what she calls good moral neighborhoods. Moral neighborhoods are collaborative normative spaces, constructed from networks of social practices and conventions, in which we can articulate and act as better versions of ourselves. The book concludes with a discussion of three social practices that contribute to good moral neighborhoods, and so to moral improvement.

Debating Education Is There a Role for Markets?

Debating Education Is There a Role for Markets?

Debating Education puts two leading scholars in conversation with each other on the subject of education-specifically, what role, if any, markets should play in policy reform. David Schmidtz and Harry Brighouse each advance nuanced arguments and respond to each other, presenting contrasting views on education as a public good. Schmidtz argues on behalf of a market-driven approach, making the case that educational opportunities do not need to be equal in order to be good. The ideal of education is not equally preparing students to win a race but maximally preparing each student to make a contribution. Harry Brighouse instead focuses on inequality, particularly the unequal distribution of rewards. He argues that justice requires prioritizing the prospects of the bottom 30% of the population, whose life prospects are much worse than justice would demand, given the current wealth of society. The moral imperative of education should be to improve this group's range of opportunities. Brighouse expresses serious skepticism that market mechanisms are capable of this task, due to imperfections in educational markets, a lack of appropriate regulations, political influence, and other systemic obstacles. At its heart, Debating Education is concerned with the nature, function, and legitimate scope of voluntary exchange as a form of social relation, and how education raises concerns that are not at issue when it comes to trading relationships between consenting adults. It will appeal to scholars and students of ethics alike, specifically those who study political philosophy, philosophy of education, as well as individuals interested in educational and public policy.

Debating Education Is There a Role for Markets?

Debating Education Is There a Role for Markets?

Debating Education puts two leading scholars in conversation with each other on the subject of education-specifically, what role, if any, markets should play in policy reform. David Schmidtz and Harry Brighouse each advance nuanced arguments and respond to each other, presenting contrasting views on education as a public good. Schmidtz argues on behalf of a market-driven approach, making the case that educational opportunities do not need to be equal in order to be good. The ideal of education is not equally preparing students to win a race but maximally preparing each student to make a contribution. Harry Brighouse instead focuses on inequality, particularly the unequal distribution of rewards. He argues that justice requires prioritizing the prospects of the bottom 30% of the population, whose life prospects are much worse than justice would demand, given the current wealth of society. The moral imperative of education should be to improve this group's range of opportunities. Brighouse expresses serious skepticism that market mechanisms are capable of this task, due to imperfections in educational markets, a lack of appropriate regulations, political influence, and other systemic obstacles. At its heart, Debating Education is concerned with the nature, function, and legitimate scope of voluntary exchange as a form of social relation, and how education raises concerns that are not at issue when it comes to trading relationships between consenting adults. It will appeal to scholars and students of ethics alike, specifically those who study political philosophy, philosophy of education, as well as individuals interested in educational and public policy.

Magic and the Dignity of Man Pico della Mirandola and His <i>Oration</i> in Modern Memory

Magic and the Dignity of Man Pico della Mirandola and His Oration in Modern Memory

Author: Brian P. Copenhaver Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/11/2019

This book is nothing less than the definitive study of a text long considered central to understanding the Renaissance and its place in Western culture. -James Hankins, Harvard University Pico della Mirandola died in 1494 at the age of thirty-one. During his brief and extraordinary life, he invented Christian Kabbalah in a book that was banned by the Catholic Church after he offered to debate his ideas on religion and philosophy with anyone who challenged him. Today he is best known for a short speech, The Oration on the Dignity of Man, written in 1486 but never delivered. Sometimes called a Manifesto of the Renaissance, this text has been regarded as the foundation of humanism and a triumph of secular rationality over medieval mysticism. Brian Copenhaver upends our understanding of Pico's masterwork by re-examining this key document of modernity. An eminent historian of philosophy, Copenhaver shows that the Oration is not about human dignity. In fact, Pico never wrote an Oration on the Dignity of Man and never heard of that title. Instead he promoted ascetic mysticism, insisting that Christians need help from Jews to find the path to heaven-a journey whose final stages are magic and Kabbalah. Through a rigorous philological reading of this much-studied text, Copenhaver transforms the history of the idea of dignity and reveals how Pico came to be misunderstood over the course of five centuries. Magic and the Dignity of Man is a seismic shift in the study of one of the most remarkable thinkers of the Renaissance.

Home in America On Loss and Retrieval

Home in America On Loss and Retrieval

Author: Thomas Dumm Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/11/2019

An extraordinary inquiry into the meaning of home, through explorations literary and political, philosophical and deeply personal, by the acclaimed author of Loneliness as a Way of Life. Home as an imagined refuge. Home as a place of mastery and domination. Home as a destination and the place we try to escape from. Thomas Dumm explores these distinctively American understandings of home. He takes us from Thomas Jefferson's Monticello and Henry David Thoreau's Walden to Laura Ingalls Wilder's little house on the prairie and Emily Dickinson's homestead, and finally to the house Herman Wallace imagined and that sustained him during his forty-one years of solitary confinement at Angola State Penitentiary. Dumm argues that it is impossible to separate the comforting and haunting aspects of home. Each chapter reveals a different dimension of the American experience of home: slavery at Monticello, radical individuality at Walden, Indian-hating in the pioneer experience, and the power of remembering and imagining home in extreme confinement as a means of escape. Hidden in these homes are ghosts-enslaved and imprisoned African Americans, displaced and massacred Native Americans, subordinated homemakers, all struggling to compose their lives in a place called home. Framed by a prologue, Dad, and an epilogue, Mom, in which the author reflects on his own experiences growing up in western Pennsylvania with young parents in a family of nine children, Home in America is a masterful meditation on the richness and poverty of an idea that endures in the world we have made.

War and Algorithm

War and Algorithm

Author: Max Liljefors, Gregor Noll, Daniel Steuer Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/11/2019

Traditional concepts of social, political, and legal theory are increasingly at odds with current practices of warfare, while more recent poststructuralist theories tend to mimic their form. A conceptual framework for capturing the real-world phenomena is missing. In robotics and artificial intelligence, particularly in weapon systems that are constituted as man-machine ensembles, there are no longer `agents' to whom `responsibility' could be ascribed, making fundamental legal concepts inapplicable. These technologies become self-validating, morally blind practices. And yet, the visual systems employed in warfare, and the rhetoric surrounding them, follow the paradigm and dream of omnivoyance, a God's eye view of the world. This idea of perfect accuracy and completeness of vision (and hence knowledge) seemingly affords objectivity to the acts carried out by the systems. It is forgotten that any form of vision produces its own forms of invisibilities (and therefore ignorance). Together the three chapters and their respondents demonstrate that it is less and less possible to articulate the oppositions between knowledge and ignorance, lawfulness and lawlessness, and visibility and invisibility, leading to a stasis in which acts of war, and war-like acts continue to spread, while their precise nature becomes increasingly difficult to pin down. Closing on a manifesto, jointly authored by Liljefors, Noll and Steuer, the book draws further conclusions regarding the changing forms of violence and likely consequences of a fully digitalized world.

Steps toward a Philosophy of Engineering Historico-Philosophical and Critical Essays

Steps toward a Philosophy of Engineering Historico-Philosophical and Critical Essays

Author: Carl Mitcham Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/11/2019

The rise of classic Euro-American philosophy of technology in the 1950s originally emphasized the importance of technologies as material entities and their mediating influence within human experience. Recent decades, however, have witnessed a subtle shift toward reflection on the activity from which these distinctly modern artifacts emerge and through which they are engaged and managed, that is, on engineering. What is engineering? What is the meaning of engineering? How is engineering related to other aspects of human existence? Such basic questions readily engage all major branches of philosophy --- ontology, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics --- although not always to the same degree. The historico-philosophical and critical reflections collected here record a series of halting steps to think through engineering and the engineered way of life that we all increasingly live in what has been called the Anthropocene. The aim is not to promote an ideology for engineering but to stimulate deeper reflection among engineers and non-engineers alike about some basic challenges of our engineered and engineering lifeworld.