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Industrial archaeology

See below for a selection of the latest books from Industrial archaeology category. Presented with a red border are the Industrial archaeology books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Industrial archaeology books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Looking for Work

Looking for Work

Author: Peter H. Stott Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/07/2007

Using 134 sites scattered across the county's 18 towns and the city of Hudson, the author weaves an authoritative and well-documented group of narrative histories linking the evidence of the landscape with the underlying economic and social history of each community. Each town narrative is accompanied by individual site descriptions, which can be used as an on-site guide to local history. The author contends that the economic development of a community is its storyline, which can be read, to a greater or lesser degree, in representative surviving structures. These landmarks give concrete form to the abstract concept of the historical past, linking the written record with the present landscape.

The Industrial Archaeology of Docks & Harbours

The Industrial Archaeology of Docks & Harbours

Author: Michael Stammers Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/07/2007

Michael Stammers tells the history of the British harbour and looks at the industrial archaeology of both harbours and ports. For over 2,000 years, we have built man-made harbours and, as an island nation, they have played a great part in our history. From the smallest harbour to huge 'super ports' like Southampton and Felixstowe, every harbour or port can give a clue to its history and development and Michael Stammers takes us through the history and shows us what remains today to give a clue as to the history of the ports.

Dictionary of Industrial Archaeology

Dictionary of Industrial Archaeology

Author: William Jones, Professor Marilyn Palmer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/12/2006

This dictionary covers the period of the Industrial Revolution, the years between 1750 and 1850, when the major developments and technical advances occurred that are the concern of industrial archaeologists. This is the only book of its kind and designed for students, professionals and academics, railway and canal enthusiasts, and anyone interested in Britain's industrial history.

Understanding the Workplace: : 2005

Understanding the Workplace: : 2005

Author: David Gwyn Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/12/2006

This volume was first delivered at a conference organised by the Association for Industrial Archaeology in Nottingham in June 2004, and formerly constituted a special issue of Industrial Archaeology Review. The papers have the explicit intention of formulating a research framework for industrial archaeology in the 21st century and demonstrating how far industrial archaeology is now a fully recognised element of mainstream archaeology.

Henry's Mill: The Historical Archaeology of a Forest Community

Henry's Mill: The Historical Archaeology of a Forest Community

Author: Peter Davies Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2006

In Defence of Landscape

In Defence of Landscape

Author: David Ride Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/03/2006

In response to German gas attacks 7000 acres of chalk downland were enclosed at Porton Down in 1916 as an experimental ground and artillery range. Consequently many monuments from the Neolithic onwards have been preserved: over 100 Neolithic and Bronze Age barrows, two Neolithic flint mines, miles of banks and ditches, two Bronze Age cremation cemeteries, a Saxon cemetery an eighteenth-century folly site, the foundations of a Victorian mansion, nineteenth-century farms, as well as remains from the first military period of use. This wealth is typical of what has been ploughed out elsewhere -- a microcosm of the archaeology of southern England.

Roads

Roads

Author: Richard Morriss Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/07/2004

The archaeological evidence shows how travel has changed over the centuries. Simple earthworks have developed into modern cuttings and tunnels; fords have been superseded by bridges of all kinds;the buildings associated with road travel are no longer wayside inns and tollhouses, but car plants and service stations; simple milestones have developed into a plethora of modern street furniture; and horse transport have been replaced by trolley buses, trams and buses. This authoritative yet elegantly written survey is the long-awaited companion volume to the author's 'Archaeology of Railways'.

Early Modern Industry and Settlement

Early Modern Industry and Settlement

Author: Barney Sloane, Stewart Hoad Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/12/2003

This richly illustrated volume presents important new evidence for early modern industry and settlement at two sites in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. Taken together, the Richmond and Mortlake sites provide valuable evidence of the great increase in development occurring in small towns on the outskirts of London from the mid 17th century. Excavation at 29-34 George St, Richmond also drew on a historical study of documentary evidence, showing the town's development from the 15th century onwards. Looking at several sites in Mortlake uncovered significant evidence pertaining to the post-medieval industry that arose here, and even included excavation of a First World War shell-filling factory.

South Wales Collieries Volume 3

South Wales Collieries Volume 3

Author: David Owen Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/11/2002

This is part of a series on South Wales Collieries, which illustrates the area's industrial history during the past 200 years, in text and photographs, and gives a glimpse of both working and village life in the valleys.

Corby Iron and Steel Works

Corby Iron and Steel Works

Author: Steve Purcell Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2002

Since Corby became the site of a new iron, steel & tube works in 1933, the village of 1,500 has grown into a new torn of 60,000. Many of the families that arrived came from north of the border and Corby became known as 'Little Scotland'. Almost 30 million tons of steel were produced in the forty-six-year life of what was once the largest plant of its type in Europe. The cost of producing steel from low-grade local ore spelled the end of the works once British Steel Corporation had built large plants with deepwater docking facilities, using high-grade imported ore. Once the shutdown was complete, work soon began on demolishing the plant and changing the face of the town that was, until 1980, totally reliant on one industry. The regeneration of the area, with the help of many millions of pounds from the Government, has been Corby pull itself back from becoming a possible ghost town. This book is a collection of images from inside The Works, showing scenes that could not be generally seen by the public. It provides an inside look into the works and is a record of an industry that is no more in the Northamptonshire countryside.

'The Hotties'

'The Hotties'

Author: Mick Krupa, Richard Heawood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2002

The remains of Pilkingtons' No 9 Tank House represent a unique survival from the 19th century, an period of rapid development within the glass industry characterised by innovative but short-lived design. These remains are now recognised as the most complete known glass furnace structures of their era. Between 1991 and 1997, Lancaster University Archaeological Unit (now Oxford Archaeology North) conducted a programme of standing building survey, excavation, and oral and documentary research, targeted on the remains on the 'Hotties' site, in St Helens, Merseyside. The tank house was purpose-built by Pilkingtons in 1887 for the manufacture of window glass using the blown cylinder method; the cone house element of the complex still stands, and is an impressive Grade II Listed building. The investigations revealed the surviving base-level remains of a continuous tank furnace, with its regenerator chambers and gas supply flues still largely intact. This report on the excavation of the site includes chapters on the historical background to glass making at Pilkingtons, the phases of construction and redevelopment at the 'Hotties' site, working conditions and industrial relations, and a discussion of the role of Pilkingtons in the development of the British glass industry.