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Classical Greek & Roman archaeology

See below for a selection of the latest books from Classical Greek & Roman archaeology category. Presented with a red border are the Classical Greek & Roman archaeology books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Classical Greek & Roman archaeology books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Death in Late Bronze Age Greece Variations on a Theme

Death in Late Bronze Age Greece Variations on a Theme

Author: Joanne M. A. (Drector, Drector, Kea Archaeological Research Survey) Murphy Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/03/2020

Late Bronze Age tombs in Greece and their attendant mortuary practices have been a topic of scholarly debate for over a century, dominated by the idea of a monolithic culture with the same developmental trajectories throughout the region. This book contributes to that body of scholarship by exploring both the level of variety and of similarity that we see in the practices at each site and thereby highlights the differences between communities that otherwise look very similar. The introduction of wealthy burials in the transition from the Middle Helladic period and the building of elaborate tombs during the Late Bronze Age underscores a long-acknowledged change in cultural importance of burials and their locations for contemporary society. Initially archaeologists were interested in these tombs because of the impressive finds that were discovered in them, but as the body of literature on mortuary rituals has grown more recently these tombs have been utilized as lenses through which we can study the related society in novel ways. By bringing together an international group of scholars working on tombs and cemeteries on mainland Greece, Crete, and in the Dodecanese we are afforded a unique view of the development and diversity of these communities. The papers provide a penetrative analysis of the related issues by discussing tombs connected with sites ranging in size from palaces to towns to villages and in date from the start to the end of the Late Bronze Age. Death in Late Bronze Age Greece contextualizes the mortuary studies in recent debates on diversity at the main palatial and secondary sites and between the economic and political strategies and practices throughout Greece. The papers in the volume illustrate the pervasive connection between the mortuary sphere and society through the creation and expression of cultural narratives, and draw attention to the social tensions played out in the mortuary arena.

Cosa The Sculpture and Furnishings in Stone and Marble

Cosa The Sculpture and Furnishings in Stone and Marble

Author: Jacquelyn Collins-Clinton Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Cosa, a small Roman town, has been excavated since 1948 by the American Academy in Rome. This new volume presents the surviving sculpture and furniture in marble and other stones and examines their nature and uses. These artifacts provide an insight into not just life in a small Roman town but also its embellishment mainly from the late Republic and through the early Empire to the time of Hadrian. While public statuary is not well preserved, stone and marble material from the private sphere are well represented; domestic sculpture and furniture from the third century BCE to the first CE form by far the largest category of objects. The presence of these materials in both public and private spheres sheds light on the wealth of the town and individual families. The comparative briefness of Cosa's life means that this material is more easily comprehensible as a whole for the entire town as excavated, compared for instance to the much larger cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Debasement Manipulation of Coin Standards in Pre-Modern Monetary Systems

Debasement Manipulation of Coin Standards in Pre-Modern Monetary Systems

Author: Kevin Butcher Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/02/2020

The debasement of coinage, particularly of silver, was a common feature of pre-modern monetary systems. Most coinages were issued by state authorities and the condition of a coinage is often seen (rightly or wrongly) as an indicator of the broader fiscal health of the state that produced it. While in some cases the motives behind the debasements or reductions in standards are clear, in many cases the intentions of the issuing authorities are uncertain. Various explanations have been advanced: fiscal motives (such as a desire to profit or a to cover a deficit caused by the failure to balance expenditure and revenues); monetary motives (such as changing demand for coined money or a desire to maintain monetary stability in the face of changing values of raw materials or labour costs); pressure from groups within society that would profit from debasement; misconduct at the mint; or the decline of existing monetary standards due to circulation and wear of the coinage in circulation. Certain explanations have tended to gain favour with monetary historians of specific periods, partly reflecting the compartmentalization of scholarship. Thus the study of Roman debasements emphasizes fiscal deficits, whereas medievalists are often more prepared to consider monetary factors as contributing to debasements. To some extent these different approaches are a reflection of discrepancies in the amount of documentary evidence available for the respective periods, but the divide also underlines fundamentally different approaches to the function of coinage: Romanists have preferred to see coins as a medium for state payments; whereas medievalists have often emphasized exchange as an important function of currency. The volume is inter-disciplinary in scope. Apart from bringing together monetary historians of different periods, it also contains contributions from archaeometallurgists who have experience with the chemical and physical composition of coins and technical aspects of production of base alloys.

Roman-Period and Byzantine Nazareth and its Hinterland

Roman-Period and Byzantine Nazareth and its Hinterland

Author: Ken (University of Reading, UK) Dark Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/02/2020

Roman-period and Byzantine Nazareth and its Hinterland presents a new social and economic interpretation of Roman-period and Byzantine Nazareth and its hinterland as a whole, showing the transformation of a Roman-period Jewish village into a major Byzantine Christian pilgrimage centre. Although Nazareth is one of the most famous places in the world, this is the first book on Roman-period and Byzantine Nazareth by a professional archaeologist, the only book to consider the archaeology of Nazareth in the context of its adjacent landscape, and the first to use contemporary archaeological methods and theory to explore Nazareth's archaeology. Taking as his starting point a systematic survey of the valley between Nazareth and the Roman town of Sepphoris, Dark offers an interpretation of communities elsewhere in the Roman world as networks of interlocking cells, with interactions along routeways being more important in cultural and economic terms than the relationship between urban centres and their surrounding countryside. His conclusions have implications for the wider archaeology of the Roman and Byzantine worlds, as well as for archaeological theory, and demonstrate the importance of Nazareth to world archaeology. This unique book will be invaluable to those interested in Nazareth and its surrounds, as well as to archaeologists and scholars of the Roman and Byzantine worlds.

Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II Finds from 1958 to 2017

Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II Finds from 1958 to 2017

Author: Georg Petzl Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/01/2020

Ancient Sardis, the capital of Lydia, was of outstanding importance: in the Lydian period it held the residence of the kings and subsequently, under Persian rule, the satraps. Throughout antiquity it remained an administrative center. Travelers of modern times and archaeological excavations have revealed, from the city site and its surroundings, inscriptions written mostly in Greek, some in Latin. Their texts deal with all kinds of subjects: decrees, public honors, civil and sacred laws, letters, epitaphs, and more. In the corpus Sardis VII 1 (1932) W. H. Buckler and D. M. Robinson published all inscriptions (228 items) known up to 1922, after which year excavation at Sardis came to a halt because of the Greek-Turkish war. Since excavation resumed in 1958, a portion of the Greek and Latin inscriptions has been published in various, widely scattered places; another portion, containing important texts discovered during the last ten years, was until now unpublished. The aim of this monograph is to present in a comprehensive corpus the entire epigraphic harvest (485 items) made in Sardis and its territory since 1958. Each inscription is accompanied by a description of the monument, bibliography, translation, and commentary; indices, concordances, photographs, and maps complement the collection.

Seleukos I and his Empire King and Colonizer

Seleukos I and his Empire King and Colonizer

Author: Lise Hannestad Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/01/2020

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Roman Germany

The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Roman Germany

Germania was one of the most important and complex zones of cultural interaction and conflict between Rome and neighbouring societies. A vast region, it became divided into urbanised provinces with elaborate military frontiers and the northern part of the continental 'Barbaricum'. Recent decades have seen a major effort by German archaeologists, ancient historians, epigraphers, numismatists, and other specialists to explore the Roman era in their own territory, with rich and often surprising new knowledge. This Handbook aims to make the results of this great effort of modern German and overwhelmingly German-language scholarship more widely available to Anglophone scholarship on the empire. Archaeology and ancient history are international enterprises characterised by specific national scholarly traditions; this is notably true of the study of Roman-era Germania. This volume compromises a collection of essays in English by leading scholars working in Germany, presenting the latest developments in current research as well as situating their work within wider international scholarship through a series of critical responses from other, very different, national perspectives. In doing so, this book aims to reveal the riches of the archaeology of Roman Germany, promote the achievements of German scholars in the area, and help facilitate continued English and German language discourses on the Roman era.

Art & Archaeology of the Roman World

Art & Archaeology of the Roman World

Author: Mark D. Fullerton Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/01/2020

Mark D. Fullerton blends the art of the Roman period with its history of political intrigue, military and religious ideologies, and intercultural interaction. The book not only explores the art of Rome itself but also that of the Roman provinces, including Syria, Egypt, Algeria, Greece and the British Isles, showing how Roman art drew from and influenced the wider ancient world. Each of the book's four parts opens with a timeline and historical overview, allowing the reader to better understand how the art relates to the political and social lives of the people of ancient Rome. Individual chapters begin with a map of Rome, illustrating how the city changed over centuries of rebuilding and reimagining. With an introduction, 'What Is Roman about Roman Art?', and 'Materials and Techniques' features on the artistic innovations introduced by the Romans, such as concrete, linear and atmospheric perspective, and mosaic, the book explores how Roman influences still affect the art and architectural world today.

The Civilization of Greece in the Bronze Age (1928) The Rhind Lectures 1923

The Civilization of Greece in the Bronze Age (1928) The Rhind Lectures 1923

Author: H.R. Hall Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2020

First published in 1928, this volume contains six sequential lectures delivered by H.R. Hall in 1923 detailing the archaeological remains of Bronze Age Greece. Hall was keeper of Egyptian and Assyrian antiquities in the British Museum and author of 'The Ancient History of the Near East'. Each of the author's lectures was strictly chronological, with the main feature of each period being described in order. The profuse illustrations recreated here were fundamental to his view, with each Age defined through its art, pottery and stone carvings. These printed lectures follow their spoken counterparts closely and are brought to life with 320 illustrations inserted in places which reflect the original performances.

The Roman Campagna in Classical Times

The Roman Campagna in Classical Times

Author: Thomas Ashby Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/12/2019

Thomas Ashby's enthusiasm for the Roman Campagna was kindled at an early age, when his family settled in Rome and his father began to explore the low-lying area surrounding the Italian capital. After graduating in classics from Oxford, Ashby (1874-1931) became the first student at the newly founded British School of Archaeology at Rome, and became the third director, holding that post from 1906 to 1925. During this period, foreign archaeologists were not permitted to excavate in Italy, so the School's activities focused on topographical and museum studies; this 1927 work was a result. The book is organised around the roads leading out of Rome, 'beginning on the left bank of the Tiber, and moving southwards (clockwise)'. Ashby provides a detailed guide to the visible remains, in particular of the villas of the noble and wealthy families who retreated to the Campagna from the turmoil of the city.

Beyond the Romans Posthuman Perspectives in Roman archaeology

Beyond the Romans Posthuman Perspectives in Roman archaeology

Author: Irene Selsvold Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/12/2019

This latest volume in the TRAC Themes in Theoretical Roman Archaeology series takes up posthuman theoretical perspectives to interpret Roman material culture. These perspectives provide novel and compelling ways of grappling with theoretical problems in Roman archaeology producing new knowledge and questions about the complex relationships and interactions between humans and non-humans in Roman culture and society. Posthumanism constitutes a multitude of theoretical positions characterised by common critiques of anthropocentrism and human exceptionalism. In part, they react to the dominance of the linguistic turn in humanistic sciences. These positions do not exclude the human , but instead stress the mutual relationship between matter and discourse. Moreover, they consider the agency of non-humans , e.g., animals, material culture, landscapes, climate, and ideas, their entanglement with humans, and the situated nature of research. Posthumanism has had substantial impacts in several fields (including critical studies, archaeology, feminist studies, even politics) but have not yet emerged in any fulsome way in Classical Studies and Classical Archaeology. This is the first volume on these themes in Roman Archaeology, aimed at providing valuable perspectives into Roman myth, art and material culture, displacing and complicating notions of human exceptionalism and individualist subjectivity. Contributions consider non-human agencies, particularly animal, material, environmental, and divine agencies, critiques of binary oppositions and gender roles, and the Anthropocene. Ultimately, the papers stress that humans and non-humans are entangled and imbricated in larger systems: we are all post-human.

What did the Sarcophagus of Symmachus Look Like? Late Antique Pagan Sarcophagi

What did the Sarcophagus of Symmachus Look Like? Late Antique Pagan Sarcophagi

Author: Niels Hannestad Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/12/2019

This book concerns the chronology of Roman mythological sarcophagi. The traditional chronology assumes a peak in production during the reign of Gallienus (AD 259-268) to fade away with the reign of Constantine. This chronology has some obvious flaws. The supposed peak under the reign of Gallienus, when the empire was falling apart, can only be described as a mirage. Some very fine sarcophagi were indeed produced in this period, but the number is very limited. With the reign of Constantine (AD 306-337) came wealth with the so-called villa boom that also revived sculpture in the round. At that time, it is believed that production of pagan sarcophagi had ceased to be replaced by Christian sarcophagi. This raises, however, a very simple question: How were pagans buried? No doubt production of pagan sarcophagi continued beyond the turn of the century and Symmachus, who died in AD 402, was buried in such a sarcophagus.