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Military history: post WW2 conflicts

See below for a selection of the latest books from Military history: post WW2 conflicts category. Presented with a red border are the Military history: post WW2 conflicts books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Military history: post WW2 conflicts books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Soldier in the Sand

Soldier in the Sand

Author: Sir Simon Mayall KBE CB Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/09/2020

With the Middle East in a state of persistent change and upheaval, there has long been a need for a comprehensive, yet readable, study that can give the intelligent and interested lay-person' a greater understanding of this diverse, complex region. The Author, whose links with the area are deep and long-standing, successfully does just that in Soldier in the Sand. As well as analysing its history and religions, which strongly influence people's actions, attitudes and relationships, he draws on his own experiences and impressions based on his many years spent in key military and diplomatic appointments in numerous countries. In addition to knowing many of the key players personally, he has studied, at leading universities, British policy and engagement in the area and he understands the effects of this long-term engagement. This invaluable book's unique mixture of history, politics, academic study and first-hand experience affords the reader an invaluable insight into a fascinating, fractured and frustrating area of the world. General Mayall explains complex situations in a thoroughly accessible and human manner. This will come as no surprise to those who have listened to his lectures worldwide, but this important and entertaining book now brings his knowledge and common-sense approach to a far wider audience.

Ripe for Rebellion

Ripe for Rebellion

Author: Stephen Rookes Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/09/2020

After many years of political struggle, the Belgian Congo was finally granted its independence in June 1960. Becoming the Republic of the Congo and later the Democratic Republic of the Congo, what was supposed to be a momentous occasion in the country's history was rapidly transformed into a bitter internecine political battle which would tear the Congo apart. Within weeks, two Congolese provinces had declared their own independence putting the Congo's economic future in jeopardy. Recruiting hundreds of white mercenaries to sustain its secession, mineral-rich Katanga then attempted to fight off all attempts to bring it back into the fold. By early 1963 the mercenaries had been forced to leave by the UN, but other major outbreaks of armed protest against the Congolese government were taking place. The most significant of these were the Stanleyville, Kindu and Kivu Rebellions led by supporters of Patrice Lumumba, the former Prime Minister assassinated in January 1961. With the Soviet Union, the Republic of China and radical African governments all aiding rebel movements, what was a series of localised conflicts became a proxy war between the East and the West. Not wishing to see the Congo fall under what it perceived as 'communist domination', the United States then began to provide its own form of military assistance to government forces. Ripe for Rebellion is the first of two volumes examining the so-called 'Congo Crisis'. Based on extensive research in multiple official archives, it throws entirely new light upon developments in a country which many US citizens of the time believed would become the next major battlefield. Richly illustrated, it provides a detailed account of the global political dynamics which led to civil war and encouraged so many to take up arms, and an intricate reconstruction of the military role played by the United States from 1964. The story told in Ripe for Rebellion will be continued in For God and the CIA, though each volume stands alone.

Operation Danube

Operation Danube

Author: David Francois Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/09/2020

On 20 August 1968, hundreds of thousands of soldiers, dozens of thousands of tanks and armoured vehicles, and hundreds of military aircraft of the Warsaw Pact armed forces invaded Czechoslovakia in an operation code-named Danube. It was the largest military undertaking in Europe since 1945. Starting with a description of the history of Czechoslovakia, especially after the communist takeover of power in 1948, this volume describes the birth and development of the Prague Spring in 1968 and an attempt to reform the communist system from within. It recounts the hostility this process encountered on the part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR/Soviet Union), and its allies within the Warsaw Pact, and provoked a split in the Kremlin about solutions for the resulting 'Czechoslovak problem'. The crisis that developed throughout the spring and summer of 1968 led to the military intervention. While paying special attention to the military and strategic aspects of the Czechoslovak crisis, this volume also provides a blow-by-blow account of its impacts upon the Czechoslovak armed forces and the Warsaw Pact. The subsequent military operation - codenamed Operation Danube - is described in all of its components, including the airborne and ground aspects, and the political operation that supported it. Within only 24 hours, the Soviet and Warsaw Pact forces secured the entire territory of Czechoslovakia, de-facto overrunning the local armed forces in the process. The Czechoslovak population organised non-violent resistance, thus highlighting the political aspects of the intervention. However, it was hopelessly out of condition to prevent the ultimate downfall of the so-called 'Prague Spring', and the related hopes. Nevertheless, the application of military power against a popularly-supported political reform marked a turning point in the Cold War, and forever changed the balance of power in Central Europe. Guiding the reader meticulously through the details of the forces involved, their organisation and equipment, Operation Danube offers a uniquely in-depth account of the invasion of Czechoslovakia and is profusely illustrated with more than 100 photos, maps, and exclusive colour artworks.

Into Helmand with the Walking Dead

Into Helmand with the Walking Dead

Author: Miles Venning, Kevin Schranz Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/2020

The Marines of First Battalion, Ninth Marines earned their macabre moniker 'The Walking Dead' in the Vietnam War. _Into Helmand with the Walking Dead_ follows the experiences of two Marine infantrymen from 1/9 fighting in Afghanistan. Following the 11 September attacks in 2001, Operation Enduring Freedom catalysed the longest war in United States history. The lives of thousands of Afghans, Americans, and many others were forever altered due to the ensuing war. The book is a brutally honest portrayal of life and death in the Marine infantry both at war in Afghanistan and upon returning to the home front, where issues of reintegration and suicide become a reality. This is the tale of the young Americans who became infantrymen and conducted America's foreign policy in its most ruthless and straight-forward manner. But war, in and of itself, is only playing a small part. The culture and environment from which they re-entered civil society would leave them uncertain, and confused as to the cataclysm they had just left. This book is a testimony to their experience and the legacy of war on their generation.

Paradise Afire Volume 3

Paradise Afire Volume 3

Author: Adrien Fontanellaz Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2020

In June 1990, a mere three months after the Indian Peace Keeping Force withdrawal from Sri Lanka, the war between the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) and the Sri Lankan government resumed and was to continue unabated until another cease-fire in early 1995. This period of the protracted Sri Lankan civil war, known as Eelam War II, saw not only the LTTE evolve into a fully-fledged semi-conventional force, but also gained the reputation of being one of the most innovative and professional armed groups ever. This volume covers in detail the coming into being and the tactics of the Sea Tigers, the movement's naval wing infamous for its swarm tactics, but also the developments related to its intelligence wings and ground forces. The Sri Lankan armed forces were however no underdog either. To the contrary, and despite numerous flaws that plagued their efforts, they were anything but passive, launching multiple offensives which were part of a cohesive and well thought-out strategy, all the while benefiting from the leadership of several extremely gifted officers, foremost Brig.Gen. Denzil Kobbekaduwa. The two warring parties thus repeatedly fought each other in battles and campaigns of unheard off size and intensity so far, inflicting telling blows upon one another, but with both failing to gain the upper hand in the long run - until the two sides entered into a new round of negotiations which halted the conflict - for a mere few months. Illustrated with over 100 photographs, maps and colour profiles, Paradise Afire Volume 3 continues the story of the internal strife that plagued Sri Lanka in the late 20th Century.

War of Intervention in Angola, Volume 3

War of Intervention in Angola, Volume 3

Author: Adrien Fontanellaz, Jose Matos, Tom Cooper Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2020

War of Intervention in Angola, Volume 3 covers the air warfare during the II Angolan War - fought 1975-1992 - through narrating the emergence and operational history of the Angolan Air Force and Air Defence Force (FAPA/DAA) as told by Angolan and Cuban sources. Most accounts of this conflict - better known in the West as the 'Border War' or the 'Bush War', as named by its South African participants - tend to find the operations by the FAPA/DAA barely worth mentioning. A handful of published histories mention two of its MiG-21s claimed as shot down by Dassault Mirage F.1 interceptors of the South African Air Force (SAAF) in 1981 and 1982, and at least something about the activities of its MiG-23 interceptors during the battles of the 1987-1988 period. On the contrary, the story told by Angolan and Cuban sources not only reveals an entirely different image of the air war over Angola of the 1980s: indeed, it reveals to what degree this conflict was dictated by the availability - or the lack of - air power and shows that precisely this issue dictated the way that the commanders of the Cuban contingents deployed to the country - whether as advisors or as combat troops - planned and conducted their operations. It is thus little surprising that the first contingent of Cuban troops deployed to Angola during Operation Carlota, in late 1975, included a sizeable group of pilots and ground personnel who subsequently helped build-up the FAPA/DAA from virtually nothing. They continued that work over the following 14 years - sometimes in cooperation of Soviet advisors and others from East European countries - eventually establishing an air force that by 1988 maintained what South African military intelligence and the media subsequently described as the 'most advanced air defence system in Africa'. Not only the air defence system in question, but also the aircraft serving as its extended arms, ultimately managed a unique feat in contemporary military history: they enabled an air force equipped with Soviet-made aircraft and trained along the Soviet doctrine to establish at least a semblance of aerial superiority over an air force equipped with Western-made aircraft and operating under a Western doctrine. Based on extensive research with help of Angolan and Cuban sources, the 'War of Intervention in Angola, Volume 3', traces the military build-up of the FAPA/DAA in the period 1975-1992, its capabilities and its intentions. Moreover, it provides a unique, blow-by-blow account of its combat operations and experiences. The volume is illustrated with 100 rare photographs, half a dozen maps and 15 colour profiles, thus providing a unique source of reference on this topic.

South African Armoured Fighting Vehicles

South African Armoured Fighting Vehicles

Author: Dewald Venter Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2020

During the Cold War, Africa became a prime location for proxy wars between the East and the West. Against the backdrop of a steep rise in liberation movements backed by Eastern Bloc communist countries such as Cuba and the Soviet Union, southern Africa saw one of the most intense wars ever fought on the continent. Subjected to international sanctions due to its policies of racial segregation, known as Apartheid, South Africa was cut off from sources of major arms systems from 1977. Over the following years, the country became involved in the war in Angola, which gradually grew in ferocity and converted into a conventional war. With the available equipment being ill-suited to the local, hot, dry and dusty climate, and confronted with the omnipresent threat of land mines, the South Africans began researching and developing their own, often ground-breaking and innovative weapon systems. The results were designs for some of the most robust armoured vehicles produced anywhere in the world for their time, and highly influential for further development in multiple fields ever since. Decades later, the lineage of some of the vehicles in question can still be seen on many of battlefields around the world, especially those riddled by land mines and so-called improvised explosive devices. South African Armour: A History of Necessity and Excellence, takes an in-depth look at 13 iconic South African armoured vehicles. The development of each vehicle is rolled out in the form of a breakdown of their main features, layout and design, equipment, capabilities, variants and service experiences. Illustrated by over 100 authentic photographs and more than two dozen custom-drawn colour profiles, this volume provides an exclusive and indispensable source of reference.

Trinidad 1990

Trinidad 1990

Author: Sanjay Badri-Mahara Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2020

Trinidad has the distinction of contributing the highest number of recruits per capita to the cause of notorious 'Islamic State'. The case of Trinidad and Tobago (usually abbreviated 'Trinidad') makes for an interesting study as on the face of it, a well-integrated Muslim population, a strong welfare state and an absence of political persecution on any religious or racial basis should not provide fertile recruiting ground for Jihadist ideology. However, the converse is most certainly the case as not only is attraction to such extremist causes growing but the numbers of Trinidadian nationals willing to fight for IS is also increasing. What is happening in Trinidad is symptomatic of a broader problem as Jihadi groups have widened their reach where apparently unconnected groups can now ally with the ideology and resource bases of better known groups without formally being part of them. The flirtation with Islamist ideology on Trinidad dates back many years and through a combination of incompetence, political naivete and unfortunate compromises. Indeed, the country faced the only Islamist coup in the entire Latin America - Caribbean region and the hemisphere. On 27 July 1990, a radical Afro-Trinidadian Islamist group, the Jamaat-al-Muslimeen, led by Imam Yasin Abu Bakr - an Afro-Trinidadian convert to Islam previously known as Lennox Philip, and a former policeman - launched an armed insurrection with 113 of his followers. Their attack quickly sacked the entire leadership of the local government: the then Prime Minister of Trinidad, Arthur N.R. Robinson, most of his cabinet and several opposition Members of Parliament, plus the staff of the government-owned television and radio networks were held hostage for six dramatic days. The Parliament Building, the television and radio studios were occupied by armed insurgents and were severely damaged during the standoff with security forces that ensued. The Trinidad and Tobago Police Service collapsed within the first hour of the insurrection, abandoning the capital city, Port of Spain, and the military took hours to assemble a viable fighting force. This book details the background to the dramatic events of July 1990 as well as the insurrection itself and the highly successfully military operation that quelled it. It was a coming of age for the Trinidad and Tobago Defence Force which, without requiring external intervention, contained and then defeated an Islamist uprising. Trinidad 1990 is illustrated by more than 100 authentic photographs from local archives, maps and colour profiles, all of which serve to illustrate what became a little-known, yet highly-successful operation against international jihadism.

Silver Birds Over the Estuary

Silver Birds Over the Estuary

Author: Bojan Dimitrijevic, Milan Micevski Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/07/2020

The Mikoyan i Gurevich MiG-21 has been built in greater numbers than any other combat aircraft since 1945. It also saw service with more air forces than any other type manufactured over the last 70 years. Locally designated the 'L' (for Lovac or fighter), for more than half a century over 260 MiG-21s in 12 different versions and sub-variants formed the backbone of the Yugoslav Air Force and Air Defence Force (JRV i PVO) and later the Serbian Air Force (RV i PVO). Entering service at the peak of the Cold War, the MiG-21 quickly replaced the US-supplied North American F-86E and F-86D Sabres in the Yugoslav inventory. The first version, MiG-21F-13, was followed by the MiG-21PFM in 1967, and MiG-21M/MF in 1970. Serving with the 204th Fighter Regiment, the task of these fighters was the air defence of Belgrade, capital of Yugoslavia. Whenever a new and more advanced variant became available, older types were handed over to other units. This is how the 117th Fighter Regiment came into being, based at the famous underground air base outside the town of Bihac. The Pristina-based 83rd Fighter Regiment followed in 1972. In Tito's Yugoslavia, the MiG-21 was also deployed for strategic reconnaissance. In 1968-1969, the JRV i PVO introduced the MiG-21R to service, which became the primary photo- and electronic reconnaissance platform of the entire military. The importance of the fleet was further increased in 1984, when US-made Fairchild KA-112 LORAP containers were added to their arsenal. The final and most widely used version became the MiG-21bis, delivered to Yugoslavia in the 1977-1983 period. By the time of the dissolution of the country, in 1991-1992, it formed the backbone of the fleet and saw intensive combat service as a fighter-bomber during the conflicts in Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Of particular interest during this period was the widespread use of diverse ordnance of native and NATO-origins. While operated by the RV i PVO, MiG-21s did not fly any combat sorties during NATO's campaign against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia of 1999 - better known as the 'Kosovo War'. Nevertheless, it was intensively targeted by NATO's air power, resulting in destruction of nearly half the fleet. Although subsequently considered 'obsolete', and operated in continuously declining numbers, the MiG-21bis continued soldiering on with the RV i PVO, and even maintained quick reaction alert duty until late 2015, when officially retired. The final handful of two-seat conversion trainers is still in service as this volume is prepared. The book is based upon the author's extensive research in Serbian and Croatian archives, museums and interviews with veterans that flew this type. Most of the photos in this volume have never been published before.

The Yugoslav Air Force in the Battles for Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina 1991-92

The Yugoslav Air Force in the Battles for Slovenia, Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina 1991-92

Author: Aleksandar Radic Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/07/2020

During the late 1980s, the former Socialist Federal Republic of Jugoslavia (SFRJ) - a country dominating the Balkans - experienced a period of major crisis. Led by the Communist Party, the nation's leadership failed to understand the depth of political changes all over Eastern Europe, and then split along ethic lines. In 1988-1989, ethnic Albanians in the autonomous province of Kosovo began demanding independence: the authorities of the SFRJ reacted by suppressing the resulting demonstrations. In the Federal Republic of Serbia, public opinion slid into nationalism, which the local communist leadership exploited to maintain itself in power. By 1990, nationalistic leaders rose to power in Slovenia and Croatia, and publicly announced their intention to secede these federal republics. Under the heavy shadow of growing war-mongering, politicians from all three sides met to reach settlements on the division of their and their emerging nation's interests. The last few influential supporters of the preservation of a federal state were quickly pushed aside, and the powerful military of the SRFJ - the Yugoslav Popular Army (Jugoslovenska Narodna Armija, JNA) - became an instrument of political games. The Slovenian and Croatian proclamations of independence, in June 1991, proved to be the drop that over spilled the barrel. Already split by deep rifts within their top political and military leaders, the federal authorities launched a rather confused attempt to recover control over the external borders of the SRFJ. The nascent Slovenian military resisted, causing a series of bloody clashes with the JNA. Tasked with the transport and protection of federal employees, the Yugoslav Air Force and Air Defence (JRViPVO) found itself in the thick of combat from day one of this conflict, when the Slovenes shot down two of its helicopters. In return, the JRViPVO began flying attack sorties, which ended only through a political agreement of 2 July 1991, and the decision for Yugoslav authorities to withdraw from Slovenia. Hard on the heels of this drama, the conflict between Croats and Serbs in Croatia reached boiling point, in the summer of 1991. Slowly at first, a major war erupted, which caught the JRViPVO in a paradoxical situation as part of it was still undergoing training, while another part had to fly shows of power, and undertake reconnaissance, transport and then the first combat operations. By September 1991, the conflict turned into an ugly slugging match: Croatian forces had blocked numerous military bases and major storage depots while the JNA received orders to lift the sieges of its surrounded units. Amid the following civil war, the JRViPVO often found itself forced to take drastic decisions, like when one of its units was relocated from the Federal Republic of Macedonia to Pula in Croatia, to fly combat sorties over the local battlefields. For the JRViPVO, the war in Croatia ended through a political settlement and a cease-fire of 3 January 1992. However, only weeks later the force was to see its final action in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where it flew combat operations against local separatists. While another political agreement resulted in a withdrawal of all federal forces from this part of the former Yugoslavia on 19 Mary 1992, and the loss (and destruction) of the major air base outside Bihac, this was also the swan song of the once proud Yugoslav air force. Based on the author's unique approach to local archives and first-hand sources, and illustrated by over 120 photographs and colour profiles, the 'JRVIPVO in Yugoslav War' is the first ever authoritative account of combat operations of the former Yugoslav Air Force in the conflict that shaped the modern-day southern Europe, and an indispensable source of reference on contemporary military history of this part of the World.

Caribbean Legion

Caribbean Legion

Author: Dan Hagedorn, Mario Overall Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/07/2020

They were the stuff of legends and, indeed, their exploits throughout the simmering Caribbean region of the late 1940s have gained a life of their own over the intervening years. They were a mix of the finest and brightest - true patriots - with a seasoning of ambitious politicians, soldiers of fortune and blatant arms merchants. But through it all, their often-splintered leadership recognized the pivotal value of air power, and so they organized one of the very first extra-national air forces - non-traditional in the extreme. This in-depth examination goes beyond the politics and noble aspirations of the participants, whether patriot or despot, and reveals for the first time the lengths that the Legionaries went to in assembling an air strike force the likes of which the world had not yet witnessed. From B-24 Liberators to P-38 Lightnings, and down to non-lethal Vultee BT-13s and lumbering transports, the Legion's Air Force could well have been the pointy end of a political transformation that would shake entrenched dictators to the core. Well-illustrated and documented by a team of award-winning aero historians, this latest addition to the excellent Helion Latin America @War series is a must for those seeking the rest of the story.

Air Wars Over Congo, Volume 1: 1960-1968

Air Wars Over Congo, Volume 1: 1960-1968

Author: Daniel Kowalczuk Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/07/2020

Ever since the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo, or DRC) was released into independence by Belgium, in June 1960, its skies have been full of action. During the crisis, and immediately afterwards, the Belgians evacuated their colonists and military personnel. Hardly was this action was over when the mineral-rich province of Katanga attempted to break away and the separatists created their own air force, the Force Aerienne Katangaise (FAK), which existed from 1960 until 1963 and saw action against forces of the United Nations (UN). In line with decisions by its members, the UN deployed contingents from several air forces of its member states to protect the integrity of the DR Congo and eliminate the FAK. In response to the emergence of leftist insurgencies, the CIA created the Congo Air Force (or Force Aerienne Congolaise), staffed entirely by foreign mercenary personnel due to the lack of native pilots and mechanics. In 1964-1965, this service saw action during the so-called 'Simba Rebellion', in eastern DRC, and in support of government and mercenary forces. In 1964, the Belgians launched their daring operation 'Red Dragon', during which their Parachute Regiment was deployed to liberate hostages held by the Simbas in Stanleyville. Finally, in eastern Congo in 1967, the former 'brothers-in-arms' - including pilots of the FAC - fought each other during the famous mercenary mutiny. From the existence of a colonial air force attached to the Belgian military and civilian colonial administration during the time before Congo's independence (June 1960), to the involvement of the Central Government Congo Air Force in fighting against mercenary mutinies in Eastern Congo (1966-67), Volume I of Air Wars over The Congo provides detailed coverage of the aircraft and air forces involved in an entire series of conflicts in this huge country. Illustrated with over 100 photographs, 15 colour profiles and half a dozen maps, it offers a unique source of reference for enthusiasts and professionals alike.