LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

First World War

See below for a selection of the latest books from First World War category. Presented with a red border are the First World War books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great First World War books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Tip and Run

Tip and Run

Author: Edward Paice Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/02/2021

The story of the First World War in Africa, which devastated an area five times the size of Germany and killed more than two million people. On 11 November 1918, the First World War came to an end in Europe. But, in Northern Rhodesia, the bloodshed persisted for another two weeks in what one campaign historian described as 'a war of extermination and attrition without parallel in modern times.' But for Major-General Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, the news of a German republic, and a Kaiser who had fled to Holland, seemed absurd. After approximately 650,000 carrier and civilian deaths in German Ruanda-Urundi and East Africa the hope of peace that armistice brought to Europe was not embraced with the same sense of relief. In Tip and Run, Paice tells the story of the elusive, relentless and fanatical Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck in an engaging and detailed narrative that exposes the horrors of the European imperial fantasies so lethally visited upon Africa. 'Superb' Sunday Times. 'Masterful' Daily Mail. 'Gripping' Daily Telegraph.

The Royal Marines on the Western Front

The Royal Marines on the Western Front

Author: Daniel J McLean Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/01/2021

From the mud of the Somme to the raid on Zeebrugge, the Royal Marines fought in almost every element of the Great War on the Western Front. Today they are known world-wide as an elite commando fighting force, but that has only been their role since 1940, a fraction of their period in existence. Until 1923 they existed as two corps - the Royal Marine Light Infantry and the Royal Marine Artillery - and both served with distinction along the western front in the great war. This book examines and explains the engagements in which they were involved, the equipment used and the organisation and training undertaken in hitherto unseen detail, drawing on a wide variety of sources to give an accurate picture of their contribution to the war in France and Belgium.

Million-Dollar Barrage

Million-Dollar Barrage

Author: Justin G. Prince Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/2021

At the beginning of the twentieth century, field artillery was a small, separate, unsupported branch of the U.S. Army. By the end of World War I, it had become the 'King of Battle,' a critical component of American military might. Million-Dollar Barrage tracks this transformation. Offering a detailed account of how American artillery crews trained, changed, adapted, and fought between 1907 and 1923, Justin G. Prince tells the story of the development of modern American field artillery - a tale stretching from the period when field artillery became an independent organization to when it became an equal branch of the U.S. Army. The field artillery entered the Great War as a relatively new branch. It separated from the Coast Artillery in 1907 and established a dedicated training school, the School of Fire at Fort Sill, in 1911. Prince describes the challenges this presented as issues of doctrine, technology, weapons development, and combat training intersected with the problems of a peacetime army with no good industrial base. His account, which draws on a wealth of sources, ranges from debates about U.S. artillery practices relative to those of Europe, to discussions of the training, equipping, and performance of the field artillery branch during the war. Prince follows the field artillery from its plunge into combat in April 1917 as an unprepared organization to its emergence that November as an effective fighting force, with the Meuse-Argonne Offensive proving the pivotal point in the branch's fortunes. Million-Dollar Barrage provides an unprecedented analysis of the ascendance of field artillery as a key factor in the nation's military dominance.

Great War Artefacts in 100 Objects

Great War Artefacts in 100 Objects

Author: Martin Mace Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/2021

The First World War touched every community and almost every home in the UK. In its wake, it left behind memories and mementos of loved ones. For every casualty there was a scar, for every death there was grief. Often the only tangible connection with those who fought, whether they survived the horrors of that brutal conflict or remained in some foreign field, are the artefacts still held, so dearly, by their families. Some might still possess the death pennies, or memorial plaques, or fathers, uncles or grandfathers sent by a grateful government, or the terrible message that told of a brother 'missing believed killed'. Not all the items held by families are sad reminders of the past. The Princess Mary Gift Fund box, sent to the men at the front for Christmas 1914, for example, contained such luxuries as chocolate and tobacco, and brought great pleasure to the men in the trenches. Items of uniforms, photographs, and, most poignant and personal of all, the letters written from the front, present the human side of an inhuman war, in a deeply moving snapshot of the past.The full-colour photographs of each 100 items are accompanied by detailed explanations of the object and the people and events which make them so special - not just to the families concerned, but to all those who hold such artefacts in cupboards, on mantelpieces or shelves, or in display cases. The memory of the men and women they represent lives on through the items they have left behind.

The First Code Talkers

The First Code Talkers

Author: William C. Meadows Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/2021

Many Americans know something about the Navajo code talkers in World War II - but little else about the military service of Native Americans, who have served in our armed forces since the American Revolution, and still serve in larger numbers than any other ethnic group. But, as we learn in this splendid work of historical restitution, code talking originated in World War I among Native soldiers whose extraordinary service resulted, at long last, in U.S. citizenship for all Native Americans. The first full account of these forgotten soldiers in our nation's military history, The First Code Talkers covers all known Native American code talkers of World War I - members of the Choctaw, Oklahoma Cherokee, Comanche, Osage, and Sioux nations, as well as the Eastern Band of Cherokee and Ho-Chunk, whose veterans have yet to receive congressional recognition. William C. Meadows, the foremost expert on the subject, describes how Native languages, which were essentially unknown outside tribal contexts and thus could be as effective as formal encrypted codes, came to be used for wartime communication. While more than thirty tribal groups were eventually involved in World Wars I and II, this volume focuses on Native Americans in the American Expeditionary Forces during the First World War. Drawing on nearly thirty years of research - in U.S. military and Native American archives, surviving accounts from code talkers and their commanding officers, family records, newspaper accounts, and fieldwork in descendant communities - the author explores the origins, use, and legacy of the code talkers. In the process, he highlights such noted decorated veterans as Otis Leader, Joseph Oklahombi, and Calvin Atchavit and scrutinizes numerous misconceptions and popular myths about code talking and the secrecy surrounding the practice. With appendixes that include a timeline of pertinent events, biographies of known code talkers, and related World War I data, this book is the first comprehensive work ever published on Native American code talkers in the Great War and their critical place in American military history.

First World War Trials and Executions

First World War Trials and Executions

Author: Simon Webb Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/01/2021

Between the beginning of the First World War in the summer of 1914 and the armistice in 1918, 51 men were executed in Britain. The great majority, over 80%, were hanged for murder, but in addition to this, 11 men were shot by firing squad at the Tower of London. One traitor and one spy were also hanged. Traitors, Spies and Killers tells the story of the most interesting and noteworthy of these executions and the crimes which led up to them. Most books about true crime focus upon the crimes themselves and the trials which followed them. In this book, Simon Webb explores in detail the fates of the condemned men, examining what happened to them after their trials and the circumstances of the executions. This makes occasionally for harrowing reading. Trends in murder are also examined. For instance, a third of those executed for murder during the First World War had used cut-throat razors to dispose of their victims; a type of crime unheard of today. Others used pokers and axes, which are also exceedingly uncommon murder weapons in the twenty first century. This is a book which will fascinate and horrify those with an interest in crime and the death penalty.

Teachers at the Front, 1914-1919

Teachers at the Front, 1914-1919

Author: Barry Blades Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/2021

August 1914. Flags waved, people cheered and armies mobilised. Millions of citizens throughout Britain responded to the call-to-arms. War fever was contagious. In the far reaches of empire, young men also pledged their allegiance and prepared to serve the King and his empire. Amongst the patriots who joined the colours were thousands of schoolmasters and trainee teachers. In London, students and alumni from the London Day Training College left their classrooms and took the King's Shilling. In the dominions, hundreds of their professional counterparts in Perth, Auckland and Toronto similarly reported to the military training grounds, donned khaki uniforms and then embarked for the 'old county' in its hour of need. Teachers at the Front 1914-1919 tells the story of these men. It recalls the decisions made by men who were united by their training, occupation and imperial connections, but were divided by social and geographical contexts, personal beliefs and considered actions. It follows these teacher-soldiers as they landed on the beaches of Gallipoli, attacked across no man's land in Flanders, on the Somme and at Passchendaele, and finally broke through the Hindenburg Line and secured victory. Many did not survive the carnage of what became known as the Great War. For those who did, wartime officers and men who had been proud to call themselves Tommies, Anzacs, Enzeds and Canucks, returning home presented further challenges and adjustments.

We Also Served

We Also Served

Author: Vivien Newman Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/01/2021

We Also Served is a social history of women's involvement in the First World War. Dr Vivien Newman disturbs myths and preconceptions surrounding women's war work and seeks to inform contemporary readers of countless acts of derring-do, determination, and quiet heroism by British women, that went on behind the scenes from 1914-1918. In August 1914 a mere 640 women had a clearly defined wartime role. Ignoring early War Office advice to 'go home and sit still', by 1918 hundreds of thousands of women from all corners of the world had lent their individual wills and collective strength to the Allied cause. As well as becoming nurses, munitions workers, and members of the Land Army, women were also ambulance drivers and surgeons; they served with the Armed Forces; funded and managed their own hospitals within sight and sound of the guns. At least one British woman bore arms, and over a thousand women lost their lives as a direct result of their involvement with the war. This book lets these all but forgotten women speak directly to us of their war, their lives, and their stories.

More Than Victims of Horace

More Than Victims of Horace

Author: Timothy Halstead Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/01/2021

The involvement of public school boys in the Great War has often been seen in terms of 'a race of innocents dedicated to romantic ideals'. It has been argued that an education based on the teaching of the classics (based on the deeds of military heroes) and the playing of games underpinned this. In A School in Arms: Uppingham and the Great War Timothy Halstead demonstrated that in the case of Uppingham this involvement was more nuanced than previously suggested. More than Victims of Horace argues that this was the case for all public schools and looks at the role of those who survived as well as those who died. The book will examine the professionalisation of the British Army in the years leading up to 1914 and how the its relationship with the public schools developed. The rapid expansion of the Army after the outbreak of the war meant that a range of skills were needed to enable it to operate effectively. This book examines how public schools with their varying approaches were able to support this expansion and prepare their boys for war as well as the common elements to the military training they provided. As part of a nation in arms the schools also contributed to the effort on the home front. Drawing on the archives of the Headmasters' Conference and several schools, the book provides the first scholarly analysis of the public schools in the Great War.

The Tritton Chaser

The Tritton Chaser

Author: R.M. Langham Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/01/2021

The idea for a smaller, faster, more manoeuvrable type of tank was thought up by Sir William Tritton as early as September 1916 shortly after the first tanks saw action, the War Office gave the go ahead for the design of the 'Tritton Chaser' to proceed. Emerging as a prototype in 1917, two hundred of the Medium Mark A tanks were initially ordered and the Army had high hopes for this fast tank, to act as a form of armoured cavalry, soon nicknamed the 'Whippet'. Persuaded by new designs, only two hundred 'Whippets' were built and at their peak equipped two Battalions of the Tank Corps. The first 'Whippets' saw action in April 1918, and continued in service through to the end of the war. Despite the small numbers used, the 'Whippet' was an effective tank for its time, using its faster speed and manoeuvrability compared to the Heavy tanks to good advantage in the fighting on the Western Front. Based on Rob Langham's dissertation for his Masters degree in a History of Britain and the First World War at the University of Wolverhampton, this book looks in detail at the conception, prototype construction, manufacturing process and operational service history of the Medium Mark A 'Whippet' Tank in great detail for the first time. Many original documents combined with Tank Corps histories have been examined and used to compile a narrative charting the development of this pioneering early tank design and its operational service on the Western Front in 1918.

Arras 1914-1918

Arras 1914-1918

Author: Jim Smithson, Tim Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/01/2021

Arras is known by some as the forgotten battle, because of this it's not one of the most written about or visited First World War areas on the Western Front; in fact, it lacks the general awareness levels when compared to the iconic battlefields of the Somme or Passchendaele. Nevertheless, The Arras battlefields hold much to interest both the seasoned and curious visitor alike, with many visual reminders of the war over 100 years on. This guide is designed to both educate and guide the visitor around four years of conflict that the city of Arras and its surrounding area endured. Organised geographically in sectors to aid the visitor, all the major engagements of the war in the Arras area are described and locations chosen to enable the visitor to gain a greater understanding of the battle; from the French on the Lorette Ridge in 1914 & 1915, the British from 1916-18 and the Canadians on Vimy Ridge in 1917, north of the city, to the Australians at Bullecourt in the south, the visitor will find the battlefield described in detail. The guide uses key observation points to ensure that the visitor is correctly orientated to get a fuller understanding of the battles and the ground they were fought over. The visitor can for example stand on Observation Ridge, look towards the city of Arras and using the description of the battle and the detailed maps and photographs taken from that key location, gain a full understanding of the attack of 12th Division on the morning of the 9th April. A detailed modern map then allows the visitor to turn and move to one of the many cemeteries in the area and again be able to read a detailed description of what he or she can see. This is not a guide that will tell you where to go or give prescribed routes but by clearly marked key locations will allow the visitor to plan their own itinerary according to time, interest or inclination. Each location has photographs and a clear description of what can be seen and what happened at key moments of the war at that place. Advice is also given as to the accessibility (car, bicycle or on foot) for each location to aid the visitor when planning. Lavishly provided with maps and photographs, this guide will be the essential companion to anyone visiting the Arras battlefields and hopefully bring them back to the area again and again. This volume deals with the area south of the River Scarpe where the British attacked in April and May 1917, the Germans in March 1918 and then the Anglo-Canadian offensive leading to the end of the war.

Censorship and Propaganda in World War I

Censorship and Propaganda in World War I

Author: Eberhard Demm Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/01/2021

This book demonstrates how people were kept ignorant by censorship and indoctrinated by propaganda. Censorship suppressed all information that criticized the army and government, that might trouble the population or weaken its morale. Propaganda at home emphasized the superiority of the fatherland, explained setbacks by blaming scapegoats, vilified and ridiculed the enemy, warned of the disastrous consequences of defeat and extolled duty and sacrifice. The propaganda message also infiltrated entertainment and the visual arts. Abroad it aimed to demoralize enemy troops and stir up unrest among national minorities and other marginalized groups. The many illustrations and organograms provide a clear visual demonstration of Demm's argument.