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Boer Wars

See below for a selection of the latest books from Boer Wars category. Presented with a red border are the Boer Wars books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Boer Wars books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

War of Words

War of Words

Author: Vincent Kuitenbrouwer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/01/2012

Between 1899 and 1902 the Dutch public was captivated by the war raging in South Africa between the Boer republics and the British Empire. Dutch popular opinion was on the side of the Boers: these descendants of the seventeenth-century Dutch settlers were perceived as kinsmen, the most tangible result of which was a flood of propaganda material intended as a counterweight to the British coverage of the war. The author creates a fascinating account of the Dutch pro-Boer movement from its origins in the 1880s to its persistent continuation well into the twentieth century. Kuitenbrouwer offers fascinating insights into the rise of organisations that tried to improve the ties between the Netherlands and South Africa and in that capacity became important links in the international network that distributed propaganda for the Boers. He also demonstrates the persistence of that stereotypes of the Boers and the British in Dutch propaganda materials had lasting effects on nation building both in the Netherlands and South Africa of the period.

Letters From the Empire

Letters From the Empire

Author: Stephen Morris Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/11/2011

From 17 trunks in a Lakeland attic comes this eyewitness account of a soldier's life at a pivotal moment in the history of the British Empire. Allan Marriot Hutchins, handsome, quick-witted and adventurous, was one of thousands of young men from the shires who, in 1900, volunteered to fight determined, well-armed Boers in a war that foreshadowed the later carnage of the twentieth century, fought with maxim guns, heavy artillery and bitter reprisals against guerrillas and civilians. Allan served as a yeomanry trooper in South Africa and later as a commissioned officer in India where he distinguished himself in the Abor campaign to secure the little-explored frontier between Assam and China. His letters home and the letters he received from home and which still survive, his diaries and thoughts paint a picture of both the man and the wheels of history turning. `He cannot write' said his schoolmaster but Allan can write and his writing brings to life the hardships and adventures of campaigning in hostile, alien terrain against an often invisible enemy. He describes the same modest aspirations, companionship and numbing routine encountered by today's front-line soldiers.

Roberts and Kitchener in South Africa 1900-1902

Roberts and Kitchener in South Africa 1900-1902

Author: Rodney Atwood Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/07/2011

The British Army was shocked by three military defeats in a week in South Africa in late 1899. The commanding General Sir Redvers Buller lost his nerve. 'Something must be done' was the cry across the Empire. Britain sent forth not one, but two military heroes. Field Marshal Lord Roberts and Major General Lord Kitchener spent their first five weeks in South Africa restoring morale, reorganising their forces and deceiving the enemy as to their intentions. In the next four weeks their offensive transformed the war: Kimberley and Ladysmith were relieved from Boer sieges and an enemy force of 4000 under General Cronje was captured on the Modder River. A long and bitter guerrilla war ensured in a terrain ideally suited to fast-moving Boer commandoes. On the dark side, deeds were committed of which no civilised empire priding itself on justice and fair play could be proud. The comradeship-in-arms of Roberts and Kitchener, their differing yet complementary personalities, their strategic and tactical decisions are described and assessed using a wide variety of sources including, personal papers and official correspondence. By these men's resourcefulness the British Army, despite its unpreparedness and poor leadership at many levels, won a remarkable victory in the first of the twentieth century 'People's Wars'.

The Boer War

The Boer War

Author: Bill Nasson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/04/2011

The Boer War was a costly colonial conflict between the British Empire and the two independent Boer republics in South Africa. Pitting the superior armed might of British imperialism against two of the world's tiniest rural states, it nevertheless took almost three years for the Boer forces to be defeated. The war saw the first use by the British of civilian concentration camps and the employment of a `scorched earth' policy against a European enemy, while the Boer amateur armies organised as commandos to try to hold out against defeat. Britain's eventual victory laid the foundations of modern South Africa. Bill Nasson, Professor of History at the University of Stellenbosch, has fully revised and updated his earlier authoritative history of the conflict, taking account of the most recent scholarship and making use of Afrikaans sources as well as those in English. He places the Anglo-Boer War struggle of 1899-1902 in its historical context with other `small wars', such as the more recent ones in Iraq and Afghanistan, making this an essential book not only for anyone interested in the Boer War, but also in imperial history more generally, and in Britain's overseas colonial campaigns.

How Can Man Die Better

How Can Man Die Better

Author: Mike Snook Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/05/2010

Wednesday 22 January 1879 was one of the most dramatic days in the long and distinguished history of the British Army. At noon a massive Zulu host attacked the 24th Regiment in its encampment at the foot of the mountain of Isandlwana, a distinctive feature that bore an eerie resemblance to the Sphinx badge of the outnumbered redcoats. Disaster ensued. Later that afternoon the victorious Zulus would strike the tiny British garrison at Rorke's Drift. How Can Man Die Better is a unique analysis of Isandlwana - of the weapons, tactics, ground, and the intriguing characters who made the key military decisions. Because the fatal loss was so high on the British side there is still much that is unknown about the battle. This is a work of unparalleled depth, which eschews the commonly held perception that the British collapse was sudden and that the 24th Regiment was quickly overwhelmed. Rather, there was a protracted and heroic defence against a determined and equally heroic foe. The author reconstructs the final phase of the battle in a way that has never been attempted before. It was to become the stuff of legend, which brings to life so vividly the fear and smell the blood.

Great Boer War

Great Boer War

Author: Byron Farwell Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/07/2009

The Great Boer War (1899 - 1902) - more properly the Great Anglo-Boer War - was one of the last romantic wars, pitting a sturdy, stubborn pioneer people fighting to establish the independence of their tiny nation against the British Empire at its peak of power and self-confidence. It was fought in the barren vastness of the South African veldt, and it produced in almost equal measure extraordinary feats of personal heroism, unbelievable examples of folly and stupidity, and many incidents of humour and tragedy. Byron Farwell traces the war's origins, the slow mounting of the British efforts to overthrow the Afrikaners, the bungling and bickering of the British command, the remarkable series of bloody battles that almost consistently ended in victory for the Boers over the much more numerous British forces, political developments in London and Pretoria, the sieges of Ladysmith, Mafeking and Kimberley, the concentration camps into which Boer families were herded and the exhausting guerrilla warfare of the last few years when the Boer armies were finally driven from the field.

Companion to the Anglo-zulu War

Companion to the Anglo-zulu War

Author: Ian Knight Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/10/2008

The Anglo-Zulu War was a defining episode in British imperial history, and it is still a subject of intense interest. The Zulu victory at Isandlwana, the heroic British defence of Rorke's Drift and the eventual British triumph are among the most closely researched events of the colonial era. In this historical companion, Ian Knight, one of the foremost authorities on the war and the Zulu kingdom, provides an essential reference guide to a short, bloody campaign that had an enduring impact on the history of Britain and southern Africa. He gives succinct summaries of the issues, events, armies and individuals involved. His work is an invaluable resource for anyone who is interested in the history of the period, in the operations of the British army in southern Africa, and in the Zulu kingdom.

The Boer War

The Boer War

Author: John Gooch Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/11/2000

This collections of essays by leading British and South African scholars, looking at the Boer War, focuses on three aspects: how the British Military functioned; the role of the Boers, Afrikaners and Zulus; and the media presentation of the war to the public.