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The Cold War

See below for a selection of the latest books from The Cold War category. Presented with a red border are the The Cold War books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great The Cold War books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Last Days in Old Europe Trieste '79, Vienna '85, Prague '89

Last Days in Old Europe Trieste '79, Vienna '85, Prague '89

Author: Richard Bassett Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/02/2020

In 1979 Richard Bassett set out on a series of adventures in central Europe which allowed him to savour the last embers of the cosmopolitan old Hapsburg lands and gave him a ringside seat at the fall of another ancien regime, that of communist rule. From Trieste to Prague and Vienna to Warsaw, fading aristocrats, charming gangsters, fractious diplomats and glamorous informants provided him with an unexpected counterpoint to the austerities of life along the Iron Curtain, first as a professional musician and then as a foreign correspondent. The book shows us familiar events and places from unusual vantage points: dilapidated mansions and boarding-houses, train carriages and cafes, where the game of espionage between east and west is often set. Music and painting, architecture and landscape, food and wine, friendship and history run through the book. The author is lucky, observant and leans romantically towards the values of an older age. He brilliantly conjures the time, the people he meets, and Mitteleuropa in one of the pivotal decades of its history.

Cold War Culture Intellectuals, the Media and the Practice of History

Cold War Culture Intellectuals, the Media and the Practice of History

Author: Jim Smyth Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/02/2020

Britain in the 1950s had a distinctive political and intellectual climate. It was the age of Keynesianism, of welfare state consensus, incipient consumerism, and, to its detractors - the so-called 'Angry Young Men' and the emergent New Left - a new age of complacency. While Prime Minister Harold Macmillan famously remarked that 'most of our people have never had it so good', the playwright John Osborne lamented that 'there aren't any good, brave causes left'.Philosophers, political scientists, economists and historians embraced the supposed 'end of ideology' and fetishized 'value-free' technique and analysis. This turn is best understood in the context of the cultural Cold War in which 'ideology' served as shorthand for Marxist, but it also drew on the rich resources and traditions of English empiricism and a Burkean scepticism about abstract theory in general. Ironically, cultural critics and historians such as Raymond Williams and E.P. Thompson showed at this time that the thick catalogue of English moral, aesthetic and social critique could also be put to altogether different purposes. Jim Smyth here shows that, despite being allergic to McCarthy-style vulgarity, British intellectuals in the 1950s operated within powerful Cold War paradigms all the same.

The Imprisoned Princess The Scandalous Life of Sophia Dorothea of Celle

The Imprisoned Princess The Scandalous Life of Sophia Dorothea of Celle

Author: Catherine Curzon Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/01/2020

When Sophia Dorothea of Celle married her first cousin, the future King George I, she was an unhappy bride. Filled with dreams of romance and privilege, she hated the groom she called pig snout and wept at news of her engagement. In the austere court of Hanover, the vibrant young princess found herself ignored and unwanted. Bewildered by dusty protocol and regarded as a necessary evil by her husband, Sophia Dorothea grew lonely as he gallivanted with his mistress under her nose. When Sophia Dorothea plunged headlong into a passionate and dangerous affair with Count Phillip Christoph von Konigsmarck, the stage was set for disaster. This dashing soldier was as celebrated for his looks as his bravery, and when he and Sophia Dorothea fell in love, they were dicing with death. Watched by a scheming and manipulative countess who had ambitions of her own, it was only a matter of time before scandal gripped the House of Hanover and tore the marriage of the heir to the British throne and his unhappy wife apart. Divorced and disgraced, Sophia Dorothea was locked away in a gilded cage for 30 years, whilst her lover faced an even darker fate.

Ambassadors of Realpolitik Sweden, the CSCE, and the Cold War

Ambassadors of Realpolitik Sweden, the CSCE, and the Cold War

Author: Aryo Makko Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/12/2019

During the Cold War, Sweden actively cultivated a reputation as the conscience of the world, working to build bridges between East and West and embracing a nominal commitment to international solidarity. This groundbreaking study explores the tension between realism and idealism in Swedish diplomacy during a key episode in Cold War history: the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe, culminating in the 1975 Helsinki Accords. Through careful analysis of new evidence, it offers a compelling counternarrative of this period, showing that Sweden strategically ignored human rights violations in Eastern Europe and the nonaligned states in its pursuit of national interests.

Margins for Manoeuvre in Cold War Europe The Influence of Smaller Powers

Margins for Manoeuvre in Cold War Europe The Influence of Smaller Powers

Author: Laurien (Utrecht University, the Netherlands) Crump Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/12/2019

The Cold War is conventionally regarded as a superpower conflict that dominated the shape of international relations between World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Smaller powers had to adapt to a role as pawns in a strategic game of the superpowers, its course beyond their control. This edited volume offers a fresh interpretation of twentieth-century smaller European powers - East-West, neutral and non-aligned - and argues that their position vis-a-vis the superpowers often provided them with an opportunity rather than merely representing a constraint. Analysing the margins for manoeuvre of these smaller powers, the volume covers a wide array of themes, ranging from cultural to economic issues, energy to diplomacy and Bulgaria to Belgium. Given its holistic and nuanced intervention in studies of the Cold War, this book will be instrumental for students of history, international relations and political science.

Suez Crisis 1956 End of Empire and the Reshaping of the Middle East

Suez Crisis 1956 End of Empire and the Reshaping of the Middle East

Author: David Charlwood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2019

In 1956 Egyptian president Gamal Abdul Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal, ending nearly a century of British and French control over the crucial waterway. Ignoring U.S. diplomatic efforts and fears of a looming Cold War conflict, British Prime Minister Anthony Eden misled Parliament and the press to take Britain to war alongside France and Israel. In response to a secretly pre-planned Israeli attack in the Sinai, France and Britain intervened as peacemakers'. The invasion of Egypt was supposed to restore British and French control of the canal and reaffirm Britain's flagging prestige. Instead, the operation spectacularly backfired, setting Britain and the United States on a collision course that would change the balance of power in the Middle East. The combined air, sea and land battle witnessed the first helicopter-borne deployment of assault troops and the last large-scale parachute drop into a conflict zone by British forces. French and British soldiers fought together against the Soviet-equipped Egyptian military in a short campaign that cost the lives of thousands of soldiers, along with innocent civilians. Suez Crisis 1956 is a fast-paced, compelling short history which moves between London, Washington and Cairo to tell the story of a crisis that brought down a prime minister and heralded the end of an empire.

Southeast Asia After the Cold War A Contemporary History

Southeast Asia After the Cold War A Contemporary History

Author: Ang Cheng Guan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2019

International politics in Southeast Asia since end of the Cold War in 1990 can be understood within the frames of order and an emerging regionalism embodied in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). But order and regionalism are now under seige, with a new global strategic rebalancing under way. The region is now forced to contemplate new risks, even the emergence of new sorts of cold war, rivalry and conflict.Ang Cheng Guan, author of Southeast Asia's Cold War, writes here in the mode of contemporary history, presenting a complete, analytically informed narrative that covers the region, highlighting change, continuity and context. Crucial as a tool to make sense of the dynamics of the region, this account of Southeast Asia's international relations will also be of immediate relevance to those in China, the USA and elsewhere who engage with the region, with its young, dynamic population, and its strategic position across the world's key choke-points of trade. This is essential reading for decisionmakers who wish to understand our current situation, looking back to the end of the Cold War thirty years ago, and forward to an uncertain future.

Exiting the Cold War, Entering a New World

Exiting the Cold War, Entering a New World

Author: Daniel S. Hamilton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2019

The Nuclear Crisis The Arms Race, Cold War Anxiety, and the German Peace Movement of the 1980s

The Nuclear Crisis The Arms Race, Cold War Anxiety, and the German Peace Movement of the 1980s

Author: Christoph Becker-Schaum Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2019

In 1983, more than one million Germans joined together to protest NATO's deployment of nuclear missiles in Europe. International media overflowed with images of marches, rallies, and human chains as protesters blockaded depots and agitated for disarmament. Though they failed to halt the deployment, the episode was a decisive one for German society, revealing deep divisions in the nation's political culture while continuing to mobilize activists. This volume provides a comprehensive reference work on the Euromissiles crisis as experienced by its various protagonists, analyzing NATO's diplomatic and military maneuvering and tracing the political, cultural, and moral discourses that surrounded the missiles' deployment in East and West Germany.

Three Knots to Nowhere A Cold War Submariner on the Undersea Frontline

Three Knots to Nowhere A Cold War Submariner on the Undersea Frontline

Author: Ted E. Dubay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 17/11/2019

Three Knots to Nowhere: A Cold War Submariner on the Undersea Frontline follows my experiences in the United States Navy, from 1966 through 1972 They include my background, Boot Camp, Electricians School, United States Naval Nuclear Program, USS Henry Clay, SSBN overhaul in Charleston S.C., transit to Hawaii, and deterrent patrols out of Guam. The work begins with me and the crew of one of the most powerful weapons on Earth, the Fleet Ballistic Missile (FBM) submarine, USS Henry Clay manning Battle Station Missile. What follows is a fresh perspective of the secret world of submarine life. It blends introspective insights, interesting and humorous antidotes, and many undocumented aspects of submarine life. It also exposes aspects about life under the sea no one else has revealed. It is the most complete representation of submarine duty to date. The narrative focuses on the enlisted men-the backbone of the submarine service. Its level of detail will appeal to submariners and laypeople.

Innocent Weapons The Soviet and American Politics of Childhood in the Cold War

Innocent Weapons The Soviet and American Politics of Childhood in the Cold War

Author: Margaret E. Peacock Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/11/2019

In the 1950s and 1960s, images of children appeared everywhere, from movies to milk cartons, their smiling faces used to sell everything, including war. In this provocative book, Margaret Peacock offers an original account of how Soviet and American leaders used emotionally charged images of children in an attempt to create popular support for their policies at home and abroad. Groups on either side of the Iron Curtain pushed visions of endangered, abandoned, and segregated children to indict the enemy's state and its policies. Though the Cold War is often characterized as an ideological divide between the capitalist West and the communist East, Peacock demonstrates a deep symmetry in how Soviet and American propagandists mobilized similar images to similar ends, despite their differences. Based on extensive research spanning fourteen archives and three countries, Peacock tells a new story of the Cold War, seeing the conflict not simply as a divide between East and West, but as a struggle between the producers of culture and their target audiences.

Honorable Survivor Mao'S China, Mccarthy's America and the Persecution of John S. Service

Honorable Survivor Mao'S China, Mccarthy's America and the Persecution of John S. Service

Author: Lynne Joiner Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/11/2019

Honorable Survivor weaves John S. Service's extraordinary story into the fabric of a watershed moment in our history when World War II was ending, the Cold War was dawning, and the McCarthy era witch-hunters were stirring. A true story of intrigue, adventure, persecution, and redemption-and the love of a loyal American wife and a Chinese lover, this biography chronicles the experiences of John S. Service. Emmy award-winning journalist Lynne Joiner tells the tale of Service, an idealistic U.S. Foreign Service officer in wartime China who had the misfortune of often being right although U.S. policymakers refused to heed his prescient reporting. He predicted Mao Tse-tung's successful revolution long before anyone else even knew the Chinese Communists were a potent force, and, subsequently, he became Sen. Joseph McCarthy's first victim. The author describes how Service was fired for doubtful loyalty--but won his job back in the U.S. Supreme Court, only to have his career neutralized by the FBI, anti-Communist politicians, the China lobby, and Chiang Kai-shek's secret police. Although newly released Soviet and U.S. documents demonstrate that some of his wartime associates were in fact identified as Communist spies or fellow travellers, Joiner shows that Service was an honourable survivor who was innocent of McCarthy's charges. About the Author Lynne Joiner is an award-winning broadcast journalist, news anchor, and documentary filmmaker. Her work has included assignments for CBS, NBC, ABC, CNN, Newsweek, and L.A. Times Magazine.