LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

The Cold War

See below for a selection of the latest books from The Cold War category. Presented with a red border are the The Cold War books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great The Cold War books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

75 years of the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works

75 years of the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works

Author: James C. Goodall Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/02/2021

The Lockheed Martin Skunk Works was founded in the summer of 1943 to develop a jet-powered high-altitude interceptor for the USAAF, and ever since it has been at the forefront of technological development in the world of aviation. From the XP-80 to the U-2, SR-71, F-117, F-22 and now the F-35, the Skunk Works team has designed aircraft that are the pinnacle of innovation and performance. 75 years of the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works takes us through the history of this legendary facility from its foundation at the height of World War II under the talented engineer, Clarence Kelly Johnson, though to the present day. Illustrated with over a thousand photographs and drawings, it details the 46 unclassified programmes developed by the Skunk Works, following them through prototype build-up, first flight and, if they reached the frontline, operational service.

The Gulf of Tonkin

The Gulf of Tonkin

Author: Tal (Bar-Ilan University, Israel) Tovy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2021

The Gulf of Tonkin

The Gulf of Tonkin

Author: Tal (Bar-Ilan University, Israel) Tovy Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Communism in Eastern Europe

Communism in Eastern Europe

Author: Melissa (Rutgers University of New Jersey, USA) Feinberg Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2021

The events of 1989 turned the Communist era in Eastern Europe into history. In the decades since, historians have gained unprecedented access to formerly closed archives and libraries. Using this new material, they have begun to rewrite the history of Communist Eastern Europe, delving into a wide range of new topics that explore the complex interactions between regime and society, including the experiences of factory workers (male and female), the response to ecological devastation, the experience of urbanization, consumption policies and practices, the politics of 1970s television, and apolitical young people more interested in music than in ideology. But most textbooks that deal with the Communist era in Eastern Europe are still narrowly focused on high politics and macroeconomic indicators. thsi book provides a new narrative of the history of Communist Eastern Europe that incorporates the insights of new research on this era, merging the political and economic history that has dominated most textbooks on this topic with social, cultural, and gender history.

The European Community and Eastern Europe in the Long 1970s

The European Community and Eastern Europe in the Long 1970s

Author: Angela (London School of Economics, UK) Romano Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

This book is an historical investigation into the role of the European Community in the overcoming of the East-West divide during the Cold War. Making use of recently released primary sources from a broad range of European and U.S. archives, the work reveals the ability of the EC and its member states to shape, implement and further develop a coordinated Eastern policy and play a significant transformative role in the Continent. It demonstrates that the EC polity successfully managed to challenge Soviet bloc-keeping imperatives, resist the US call for a confrontational stance towards the Communist world, and promote instead new intra-European relations based on cooperation and interdependence. The book argues that the EC Ostpolitik contributed to undermining the socialist integration, offered an alternative path of relations to Eastern European countries, and established the influential role of the Community in the continent, laying the ground on which to build post-Cold War Europe. This book is a thorough addition to both Cold War and European integration historiographies, and sheds new light on the interrelation between the two. It also adds to the broader history and understanding of contemporary Europe in that it reveals a pro-active role of the EC towards the East since the early 1970s, whereas historians and political scientists generally admit an effective role of the European institutions only in the post-communist era. The book actively engages with Cold War historiographical debates on detente and its alleged crisis, the end of the Cold War, and the role of actors other than the superpowers in shaping East-West relations. The EC is now recognised as having played a determinant role in the Helsinki Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) and the elaboration of its Final Act. The volume demonstrates that the EC was an important actor in the Cold War beyond the time and scope of the Helsinki Conference, and actively and effectively contributed to the overcoming of the bloc order in Europe. This book will be of much interest to students of Cold War Studies, European political history, foreign policy and international relations.

Between Empire and Europe

Between Empire and Europe

Between the end of WWII and the end of the Cold War, the international roles of France and Great Britain changed dramatically. Major international powers were now states much bigger than European nations in terms of population, wealth, military capacity. Analyzing the international political discourse developed by French and British intellectuals and the wider public debate they prompted during the Cold War, this book addresses how the public sphere reacted and adapted to rapidly changing historical circumstances, and how intellectuals responded to a new and challenging relationship between national and foreign policy within a global context.

Camp Century

Camp Century

Author: Henry Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfeldt Nielsen Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/12/2020

At the height of the Cold War, the US Army secretly began work on a military base embedded deep in the Greenland ice cap. Officially named Camp Century and defined as a scientific research station, this facility held an undisclosed potential to bring about mass destruction. The long-term plan of the United States: up to 600 nuclear warheads, buried in the ice, and aimed at the Soviet Union. In 1963, just three years after the camp was established, the Americans gave up their controversial strategy, and in 1966 they abandoned the base. Nevertheless, controversies over Camp Century have cooled political and diplomatic relations between the United States, Greenland and Denmark on several occasions, before, during and after its brief life. Camp Century. Cold War City under the Greenland Ice Sheet is the first comprehensive account of the US Army's city under the ice . Here, two Danish historians of science - Kristian Hvidtfelt Nielsen and Henry Nielsen - unravel the history and circumstances surrounding this extraordinary military installation. Moving from the post-war years up to the present, they follow the intertwining threads of high-level politics, top-secret memos, ice-core research, media angles, daily life beneath the ice, and the specter of long-buried environmental problems that will someday resurface as the Greenland ice cap slowly melts.

Communist Parties Revisited

Communist Parties Revisited

Author: Ruediger Bergien Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/10/2020

The ruling communist parties of the postwar Soviet Bloc possessed nearly unprecedented power to shape every level of society; perhaps in part because of this, they have been routinely depicted as monolithic, austere, and even opaque institutions. Communist Parties Revisited takes a markedly different approach, investigating everyday life within basic organizations to illuminate the inner workings of Eastern Bloc parties. Ranging across national and transnational contexts, the contributions assembled here reconstruct the rituals of party meetings, functionaries' informal practices, intra-party power struggles, and the social production of ideology to give a detailed account of state socialist policymaking on a micro-historical scale.

Singapore, ASEAN and the Cambodian Conflict, 1978-1991

Singapore, ASEAN and the Cambodian Conflict, 1978-1991

Author: Ang Cheng Guan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/10/2020

This is a ground-breaking study of the diplomatic efforts in the aftermath of Vietnam's 1978 invasion of Cambodia. In retrospect, the resolution of the Cambodian conflict marked an important shift in the international relations landscape of the region. Cold War big power politics gave way to a diplomacy centred on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). This study is the first written based on the records of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Singapore, a key player in the complex diplomatic maneuvering of the period.

Innocent Weapons

Innocent Weapons

Author: Margaret E. Peacock Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/10/2020

In the 1950s and 1960s, images of children appeared everywhere, from movies to milk cartons, their smiling faces used to sell everything, including war. In this provocative book, Margaret Peacock offers an original account of how Soviet and American leaders used emotionally charged images of children in an attempt to create popular support for their policies at home and abroad. Groups on either side of the Iron Curtain pushed visions of endangered, abandoned, and segregated children to indict the enemy's state and its policies. Though the Cold War is often characterized as an ideological divide between the capitalist West and the communist East, Peacock demonstrates a deep symmetry in how Soviet and American propagandists mobilized similar images to similar ends, despite their differences. Based on extensive research spanning fourteen archives and three countries, Peacock tells a new story of the Cold War, seeing the conflict not simply as a divide between East and West, but as a struggle between the producers of culture and their target audiences.

The Cold War (1945-1991)

The Cold War (1945-1991)

Author: Salem Press Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/10/2020

Defining Documents in American History: The Cold War offers in-depth analysis of a broad range of historical documents and historic events that shaped the Cold War conflict between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. This text closely studies more than forty primary source documents to deliver a thorough examination of the Cold War from 1945 to 1991. Defining Documents in American History: The Cold War provides detailed, thought-provoking analysis of: Post-World War II Alliances and Enmities The Domino Theory, Containment, and Other Cold War Principles Anticommunism in the United States Espionage and the Intelligence Agencies Daily Life in the Cold War EraThe Close of the Cold War An historical timeline and bibliography of important supplemental readings will support readers in understanding the broader historical events and subjects in the period. An introduction for each of the major subjects covered in the title considers the significance of document analysis for students and educators. Each in-depth chapter guides readers with historical insight and comprehension. The documents included represent the diversity of ideas and contexts that defined social, political, and cultural subjects throughout this period in American history. Defining Documents consists of a collection of essays on important historical documents by a diverse range of writers on a broad range of subjects in American history. The series offers a broad range of historical documents on important authors and subjects in American history, with primary source documents, in-depth analysis, and comprehensive lesson plans that represent the diversity of ideas and contexts that define social, political and cultural subjects throughout American history. The Defining Documents series is perfect for students, those researching a particular era, or anyone interested in American History since 1492.

Hanoi Jane

Hanoi Jane

Author: Jerry Lembcke Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/10/2020

From Aristophanes' Lysistrata to the notorious Mata Hari and the legendary Tokyo Rose, stories of female betrayal during wartime have recurred throughout human history. The myth of Hanoi Jane, Jerry Lembcke argues, is simply the latest variation on this enduring theme. Like most of the iconic femmes fatales who came before, it is based on a real person, Jane Fonda. And also like its predecessors, it combines traces of fact with heavy doses of fiction to create a potent symbol of feminine perfidy--part erotic warrior-woman Barbarella, part savvy anti-war activist, and part powerful entrepreneur. Hanoi Jane, the book, deconstructs Hanoi Jane, the myth, to locate its origins in the need of Americans to explain defeat in Vietnam through fantasies of home-front betrayal and the masculation of the national will-to-war. Lembcke shows that the expression Hanoi Jane did not reach the eyes and ears of most Americans until five or six years after the end of the war in Vietnam. By then, anxieties about America's declining global status and deteriorating economy were fuelling a populist reaction that pointed to the loss of the war as the taproot of those problems. Blaming the anti-war movement for undermining the military's resolve, many found in the imaginary Hanoi Jane the personification of their stab-in-the back theories. Ground zero of the myth was the city of Hanoi itself, which Jane Fonda had visited as a peace activist in July 1972. Rumours surrounding Fonda's visits with U.S. POWs and radio broadcasts to troops combined to conjure allegations of treason that had cost American lives. That such tales were more imagined than real did not prevent them from insinuating themselves into public memory, where they have continued to infect American politics and culture. Hanoi Jane is a book about the making of Hanoi Jane by those who saw a formidable threat in the Jane Fonda who supported soldiers and veterans opposed to the war they fought, in the postcolonial struggle of the Vietnamese people to make their own future, and in the movements of women everywhere for gender equality.