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Slavery & abolition of slavery

See below for a selection of the latest books from Slavery & abolition of slavery category. Presented with a red border are the Slavery & abolition of slavery books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Slavery & abolition of slavery books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Notorious Massacre At Calabar In 1767

The Notorious Massacre At Calabar In 1767

Author: David Imbua, Paul Lovejoy, Randy Sparks Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/11/2019

My Soul: Enslaved

My Soul: Enslaved

Author: Sheila Moore Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2019

My Soul: Enslaved

My Soul: Enslaved

Author: Sheila Moore Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/11/2019

The New Race Selected Writings, 1901 - 1904

The New Race Selected Writings, 1901 - 1904

Author: William H.H. Johnson, Wayde Compton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/10/2019

William H.H. Johnson's The Life of Wm. H.H. Johnson, from 1839 to 1900, and the New Race (1904) is the only classical slave narrative in the black North American tradition published by a British Columbian. In his memoir, Johnson writes an account of his mother's flight from Kentucky to Indiana while pregnant with him. During his youth, his family were station masters of the Underground Railroad in various towns in Indiana, helping blacks escape to freedom in Canada. Although Indiana was ostensibly a free state, the law allowed bounty hunters to recapture those who had freed themselves. Johnson's family ultimately fled to Ontario. Johnson migrated west to British Columbia, where he worked as a varnish maker in the Vancouver neighbourhood of Mount Pleasant. There he wrote his life story. Johnson also wrote a tract called The Horrors of Slavery. Both works are included in this volume. Wayde Compton's afterword puts Johnson's life and writing in historical context, comparing his life to the lives of other enslaved people who escaped to BC, whose stories were told by others.

Envoys of abolition British Naval Officers and the Campaign Against the Slave Trade in West Africa

Envoys of abolition British Naval Officers and the Campaign Against the Slave Trade in West Africa

Author: Mary Wills Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/10/2019

After Britain's Abolition of the Slave Trade Act of 1807, a squadron of Royal Navy vessels was sent to the West Coast of Africa tasked with suppressing the thriving transatlantic slave trade. Drawing on previously unpublished papers found in private collections and various archives in the UK and abroad, this book examines the personal and cultural experiences of the naval officers at the frontline of Britain's anti-slavery campaign in West Africa. It explores their unique roles in this 60-year operation: at sea, boarding slave ships bound for the Americas and `liberating' captive Africans; on shore, as Britain resolved to `improve' West African societies; and in the metropolitan debates around slavery and abolitionism in Britain. Their personal narratives are revealing of everyday concerns of health, rewards and strategy, to more profound questions of national honour, cultural encounters, responsibility for the lives of others in the most distressing of circumstances, and the true meaning of `freedom' for formerly enslaved African peoples. British anti-slavery efforts and imperial agendas were tightly bound in the nineteenth century, inseparable from ideas of national identity. This is a book about individuals tasked with extraordinary service, military men who also worked as guardians, negotiators, and envoys of abolition.

That Most Precious Merchandise The Mediterranean Trade in Black Sea Slaves, 1260-1500

That Most Precious Merchandise The Mediterranean Trade in Black Sea Slaves, 1260-1500

Author: Hannah Barker Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/10/2019

The history of the Black Sea as a source of Mediterranean slaves stretches from ancient Greek colonies to human trafficking networks in the present day. At its height during the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, the Black Sea slave trade was not the sole source of Mediterranean slaves; Genoese, Venetian, and Egyptian merchants bought captives taken in conflicts throughout the region, from North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, the Balkans, and the Aegean Sea. Yet the trade in Black Sea slaves provided merchants with profit and prestige; states with military recruits, tax revenue, and diplomatic influence; and households with the service of enslaved women, men, and children. Even though Genoa, Venice, and the Mamluk sultanate of Egypt and Greater Syria were the three most important strands in the web of the Black Sea slave trade, they have rarely been studied together. Examining Latin and Arabic sources in tandem, Hannah Barker shows that Christian and Muslim inhabitants of the Mediterranean shared a set of assumptions and practices that amounted to a common culture of slavery. Indeed, the Genoese, Venetian, and Mamluk slave trades were thoroughly entangled, with wide-ranging effects. Genoese and Venetian disruption of the Mamluk trade led to reprisals against Italian merchants living in Mamluk cities, while their participation in the trade led to scathing criticism by supporters of the crusade movement who demanded commercial powers use their leverage to weaken the force of Islam. Reading notarial registers, tax records, law, merchants' accounts, travelers' tales and letters, sermons, slave-buying manuals, and literary works as well as treaties governing the slave trade and crusade propaganda, Barker gives a rich picture of the context in which merchants traded and enslaved people met their fate.

The Psychic Hold of Slavery Legacies in American Expressive Culture

The Psychic Hold of Slavery Legacies in American Expressive Culture

Author: Soyica Diggs Colbert Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/10/2019

What would it mean to get over slavery ? Is such a thing possible? Is it even desirable? Should we perceive the psychic hold of slavery as a set of mental manacles that hold us back from imagining a postracist America? Or could the psychic hold of slavery be understood as a tool, helping us get a grip on the systemic racial inequalities and restricted liberties that persist in the present day? Featuring original essays from an array of established and emerging scholars in the interdisciplinary field of African American studies, The Psychic Hold of Slavery offers a nuanced dialogue upon these questions. With a painful awareness that our understanding of the past informs our understanding of the present - and vice versa - the contributors place slavery's historical legacies in conversation with twenty-first-century manifestations of antiblack violence, dehumanization, and social death. Through an exploration of film, drama, fiction, performance art, graphic novels, and philosophical discourse, this volume considers how artists grapple with questions of representation, as they ask whether slavery can ever be accurately depicted, trace the scars that slavery has left on a traumatized body politic, or debate how to best convey that black lives matter. The Psychic Hold of Slavery thus raises provocative questions about how we behold the historically distinct event of African diasporic enslavement and how we might hold off the transhistorical force of antiblack domination.

Accounting for Slavery Masters and Management

Accounting for Slavery Masters and Management

Author: Caitlin Rosenthal Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2019

A Five Books Best Economics Book of the Year A Politico Great Weekend Read Absolutely compelling. -Diane Coyle The evolution of modern management is usually associated with good old-fashioned intelligence and ingenuity... But capitalism is not just about the free market; it was also built on the backs of slaves. -Forbes The story of modern management generally looks to the factories of England and New England for its genesis. But after scouring through old accounting books, Caitlin Rosenthal discovered that Southern planter-capitalists practiced an early form of scientific management. They took meticulous notes, carefully recording daily profits and productivity, and subjected their slaves to experiments and incentive strategies comprised of rewards and brutal punishment. Challenging the traditional depiction of slavery as a barrier to innovation, Accounting for Slavery shows how elite planters turned their power over enslaved people into a productivity advantage. The result is a groundbreaking investigation of business practices in Southern and West Indian plantations and an essential contribution to our understanding of slavery's relationship with capitalism. Slavery in the United States was a business. A morally reprehensible-and very profitable business... Rosenthal argues that slaveholders...were using advanced management and accounting techniques long before their northern counterparts. Techniques that are still used by businesses today. -Marketplace (American Public Media) Rosenthal pored over hundreds of account books from U.S. and West Indian plantations... She found that their owners employed advanced accounting and management tools, including depreciation and standardized efficiency metrics. -Harvard Business Review

The Cambridge World History of Slavery: Volume 4, AD 1804-AD 2016

The Cambridge World History of Slavery: Volume 4, AD 1804-AD 2016

Author: Keith Bradley Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/10/2019

Slavery and coerced labor have been among the most ubiquitous of human institutions both in time - from ancient times to the present - and in place, having existed in virtually all geographic areas and societies. This volume covers the period from the independence of Haiti to modern perceptions of slavery by assembling twenty-eight original essays, each written by scholars acknowledged as leaders in their respective fields. Issues discussed include the sources of slaves, the slave trade, the social and economic functioning of slave societies, the responses of slaves to enslavement, efforts to abolish slavery continuing to the present day, the flow of contract labor and other forms of labor control in the aftermath of abolition, and the various forms of coerced labor that emerged in the twentieth century under totalitarian regimes and colonialism.

What Slaveholders Think How Contemporary Perpetrators Rationalize What They Do

What Slaveholders Think How Contemporary Perpetrators Rationalize What They Do

Author: Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/10/2019

Drawing on fifteen years of work in the antislavery movement, Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick examines the systematic oppression of men, women, and children in rural India and asks: How do contemporary slaveholders rationalize the subjugation of other human beings, and how do they respond when their power is threatened? More than a billion dollars have been spent on antislavery efforts, yet the practice persists. Why? Unpacking what slaveholders think about emancipation is critical for scholars and policy makers who want to understand the broader context, especially as seen by the powerful. Insight into those moments when the powerful either double down or back off provides a sobering counterbalance to scholarship on popular struggle. Through frank and unprecedented conversations with slaveholders, Choi-Fitzpatrick reveals the condescending and paternalistic thought processes that blind them. While they understand they are exploiting workers' vulnerabilities, slaveholders also feel they are doing workers a favor, often taking pride in this relationship. And when the victims share this perspective, their emancipation is harder to secure, driving some in the antislavery movement to ask why slaves fear freedom. The answer, Choi-Fitzpatrick convincingly argues, lies in the power relationship. Whether slaveholders recoil at their past behavior or plot a return to power, Choi-Fitzpatrick zeroes in on the relational dynamics of their self-assessment, unpacking what happens next. Incorporating the experiences of such pivotal actors into antislavery research is an immensely important step toward crafting effective antislavery policies and intervention. It also contributes to scholarship on social change, social movements, and the realization of human rights.

Girl in Black and White The Story of Mary Mildred Williams and the Abolition Movement

Girl in Black and White The Story of Mary Mildred Williams and the Abolition Movement

Author: Jessie Morgan-Owens Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/10/2019

When a decades-long court battle resulted in her family's freedom in 1855, seven-year-old Mary Mildred Williams unexpectedly became the face of American slavery. Famous abolitionists Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry David Thoreau, and John Albion Andrew would help Mary and her family in freedom, but Senator Charles Sumner saw a monumental political opportunity. Due to generations of sexual violence, Mary's skin was so light that she passed as white, and this fact would make her the key to his white audience's sympathy. During his sold-out abolitionist lecture series, Sumner paraded Mary in front of rapt audiences as evidence that slavery was not bounded by race. Weaving together long-overlooked primary sources and arresting images, including the daguerreotype that turned Mary into the poster child of a movement, Jessie Morgan-Owens investigates tangled generations of sexual enslavement and the fraught politics that led Mary to Sumner. She follows Mary's story through the lives of her determined mother and grandmother to her own adulthood, parallel to the story of the antislavery movement and the eventual signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Girl in Black and White restores Mary to her rightful place in history and uncovers a dramatic narrative of travels along the Underground Railroad, relationships tested by oppression, and the struggles of life after emancipation. The result is an expose of the thorny racial politics of the abolitionist movement and the pervasive colorism that dictated where white sympathy lay-one that sheds light on a shameful legacy that still affects us profoundly today.

NYC's African Slaveowners A Social & Material Hist.

NYC's African Slaveowners A Social & Material Hist.

Author: Sherrill D. Wilson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/10/2019

First published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.