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Colonialism & imperialism

See below for a selection of the latest books from Colonialism & imperialism category. Presented with a red border are the Colonialism & imperialism books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Colonialism & imperialism books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Artisans, Sufis, Shrines Colonial Architecture in Nineteenth-Century Punjab

Artisans, Sufis, Shrines Colonial Architecture in Nineteenth-Century Punjab

Author: Hussain Ahmad Khan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/03/2020

In nineteenth-century Punjab, a cultural tug-of-war ensued as both Sufi mystics and British officials aimed to engage the local artisans as a means of realizing their ideological ambitions. When it came to influence and impact, the Sufi shrines had a huge advantage over the colonial art institutions, such as the Mayo School of Arts in Lahore. The mystically-inspired shrines, built as a statement of Muslim ruling ambitions, were better suited to the task of appealing to local art traditions. By contrast the colonial institutions, rooted in the Positivist Romanticism of the Victorian West, found assimilation to be more of a challenge. In questioning their relative success and failures at influencing local culture, the book explores the extent to which political control translates into cultural influence. Folktales, Sufi shrines, colonial architecture, institutional education methods and museum exhibitions all provide a wealth of sources for revealing the complex dynamic between the Punjabi artisans, the Sufi community and the colonial British. In this unique look at a little-explored aspect of India's history, Hussain Ahmad Khan explores this evidence in order to illuminate this web of cultural influences. Examining the Sufi-artisan relationship within the various contexts of political revolt, the decline of the Mughals and the struggle of the Sufis to establish an Islamic state, this book argues that Sufi shrines were initially constructed with the aim of affirming a distinct 'Muslim' identity. At the same time, art institutions established by colonial officials attempted to promote eclectic architecture representing the 'British Indian empire', as well as to revive the pre-colonial traditions with which they had previously seemed out of touch. This important book sheds new light on the dynamics of power and culture in the British Empire.

Cyprus in the 1930s British Colonial Rule and the Roots of the Cyprus Conflict

Cyprus in the 1930s British Colonial Rule and the Roots of the Cyprus Conflict

Author: Alexis Rappas Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/03/2020

Why has the unification of Cyprus proved impossible? The existing literature looks to the 1950s, and the formation of EOKA under George Grivas. Here, Alexis Rappas challenges the dominance of that starting point in the current histories of the island, showing that the key to the conflict between the British Empire and Greek Cypriots lies in the disputes of the 1930s. Cyprus in the 1930s charts the history of the island in this period, and details British attempts to impose a homogeneous 'Cypriot' culture onto a diverse and divided population. Community leaders and the hierarchy of the Church, who had functioned as bridges between local interests, were marginalised as Britain attempted to engineer unification through education and social policy. The result was a radicalisation of both Turkish-Cypriot and Greek-Cypriot identity. Based on new primary source material from Britain, Cyprus and Greece. Rappas analyses British state-building and the role of Cypriot ethnicities in the formation of modern Cyprus.

Protectorate Cyprus British Imperial Power before WWI

Protectorate Cyprus British Imperial Power before WWI

Author: Gail Dallas Hook Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/03/2020

A strategic outpost in the Eastern Mediterranean, Cyprus was vital to British imperial ambitions in the East as the Ottoman Empire grew increasingly fragile in the nineteenth century. Here, Gail Dallas Hook describes the British occupation of Cyprus from 1878 to 1914, during which British government, science, and capital investment were installed alongside a new British colonial community, building 'British Cyprus' long before the island became a formal part of the British Empire. Protectorate Cyprus further demonstrates how the British attempted to bring 'good government' to Cyprus yet failed to resolve the issues of Muslim and Greek Orthodox divisions. It is a unique representation of Britain's 'informal empire' before World War I that has been little studied. Protectorate Cyprus is a crucial addition to the history of the British Empire.

Born in Tibet By Cho gyam Trungpa, the Eleventh Trungpa Tulku, as told to Esme Cramer Roberts

Born in Tibet By Cho gyam Trungpa, the Eleventh Trungpa Tulku, as told to Esme Cramer Roberts

Author: Choegyam Trungpa Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2020

This is the story of the early life and escape from the Chinese of a young tulku of Tibet, an incarnate lama of high rank. The book, first published in 1966, shows the quality of human life as lived in Tibet at all levels. The account of his religious education is detailed and of equal value is his description of the meditational centres and seminaries and of his tutors and spiritual teachers.

British India and Tibet: 1766-1910

British India and Tibet: 1766-1910

Author: Alastair Lamb Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2020

This book, first published in 1960 and revised in 1986, is an important analysis of the under-studied Northern frontier of the British Indian Empire. It considers British relations across the Himalayas, looking at encounters with Bhutan, Sikkim, Nepal and Tibet.

Buddhists and Glaciers of Western Tibet

Buddhists and Glaciers of Western Tibet

Author: Giotto Dainelli Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2020

This book, first published in 1933, reproduces the diary of the 1930 explorations by the great Italian traveller, Giotto Dainelli. In it he records his experiences as he travels the little-explored (by Westerners) region of Western Tibet, and the result is a detailed snapshot of Tibetan life, cultures and customs of the time.

The Religions of Tibet

The Religions of Tibet

Author: Helmut Hoffmann Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2020

This book, first published in 1961, examines the old Tibetan Bon religion, the development of Buddhism in India and Tibet, and covers the religious struggles of the eighth and ninth centuries. It also describes the rise of the Lamaist sects and the priest state of the Dalai Lamas, and taken as a whole is a study of the development of the character of Tibet itself.

History, Empire, and Islam E. A. Freeman and Victorian Public Morality

History, Empire, and Islam E. A. Freeman and Victorian Public Morality

Author: Vicky Randall Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/03/2020

This book offers the first comprehensive treatment of the historian and public moralist E. A. Freeman since the publication of W. R. W. Stephens' Life and Letters of Edward A. Freeman (1895). While Freeman is often viewed by modern scholars as a panegyrist to English progress and a proponent of Aryan racial theory, this study suggests that his world-view was more complicated than it appears. Revisiting Freeman's most important historical works, this book positions Thomas Arnold as a significant influence on Freeman's view of world-historical development. Conceptualising the past as cyclical rather than unilinear, and defining race in terms of culture, rather than biology, Freeman's narratives were pervaded by anxieties about recapitulation. Ultimately, this study shows that Freeman's scheme of universal history was based on the idea of conflict between Euro-Christendom and the Judeo-Islamic Orient, and this shaped his engagement with contemporary issues. -- .

Knowledge, Mediation and Empire James Tod's Journeys Among the Rajputs

Knowledge, Mediation and Empire James Tod's Journeys Among the Rajputs

Author: Florence D'Souza Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2020

This study of the British colonial administrator James Tod (1782-1835), who spent five years in north-western India (1818-22) collecting every conceivable type of material of historical or cultural interest on the Rajputs and the Gujaratis, gives special attention to his role as a mediator of knowledge about this little-known region of the British Empire in the early nineteenth century to British and European audiences. The book aims to illustrate that British officers did not spend all their time oppressing and inferiorising the indigenous peoples under their colonial authority, but also contributed to propagating cultural and scientific information about them, and that they did not react only negatively to the various types of human difference they encountered in the field. -- .

Keeping Hold of Justice Encounters between Law and Colonialism

Keeping Hold of Justice Encounters between Law and Colonialism

Author: Jennifer Balint, Julie Evans, Nesam McMillan, Mark David McMillan Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Four of the Chief Investigators from the Minutes of Evidence project-which combines research, education, performance, and public engagement to spark new ways of understanding structural inequalities in settler societies like Australia-closely consider the law's complex relation to the structural injustices of colonialism. This interdisciplinary book brings together the insights and approaches of history, criminology, socio-legal studies, and law to present a range of case studies of the encounter between law and colonialism. Through historical and contemporary case studies, it emphasizes the nature of colonialism as a structural injustice that becomes entrenched in the social, political, legal, and discursive structures of societies and continues to affect people's lives in the present. It charts the role of law in both enabling and sustaining colonial injustice and in recognizing and redressing it. Despite the enduring legacies and harms of colonialism, Keeping Hold of Justice contends that possibilities for structural justice can be found thorough collaborative methodologies and practices that actively bring together different disciplines, peoples, temporalities, laws, and ways of knowing into dynamic relation. They reveal law not only as a source of colonial harm but also as a potential means of keeping hold of justice.

Colonial Seeds in African Soil A Critical History of Forest Conservation in Sierra Leone

Colonial Seeds in African Soil A Critical History of Forest Conservation in Sierra Leone

Author: Paul Munro Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Empire forestry -the broadly shared forest management practice that emerged in the West in the nineteenth century-may have originated in Europe, but it would eventually reshape the landscapes of colonies around the world. Melding the approaches of environmental history and political ecology, Colonial Seeds in African Soil unravels the complex ways this dynamic played out in twentieth-century colonial Sierra Leone. While giving careful attention to topics such as forest reservation and exploitation, the volume moves beyond conservation practices and discourses, attending to the overlapping social, economic, and political contexts that have shaped approaches to forest management over time.

Gladstone and Kruger Liberal Government & Colonial 'Home Rule' 1880-85

Gladstone and Kruger Liberal Government & Colonial 'Home Rule' 1880-85

Author: Deryck Schreuder Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/02/2020

Originally published in 1969, Gladstone and Kruger examines British reactions to the Afrikaner nationalism. Beginning with the first Anglo-Boer war of 1880-81, it examines the formulation of policy after the British defeat at Majuba Hill. A that moment, the dangers of a pan-Afrikaner revolt in the Transvaal, Orange Free State and Cape Province seemed imminent, and the British presence in southern Africa seemed very much at risk. Schreuder shows how the devolution of metropolitan Imperial power on to local ministries conflicted with the Whig concern for the preservation of British dominance and prestige abroad and provides a commentary on the Liberal response to the Irish problem.