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Historical geography

See below for a selection of the latest books from Historical geography category. Presented with a red border are the Historical geography books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Historical geography books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

A People's Guide to the San Francisco Bay Area

A People's Guide to the San Francisco Bay Area

Author: Rachel Brahinsky, Alexander Tarr, Bruce Rinehart Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/10/2020

A People's Guide to the San Francisco Bay Area looks beyond the mythologized image of San Francisco to the places where collective struggle has built the region. Countering romanticized commercial narratives about the Bay Area, geographers Rachel Brahinsky and Alexander Tarr highlight the cultural and economic landscape of indigenous resistance to colonial rule, radical interracial and cross-class organizing against housing discrimination and police violence, young people demanding economically and ecologically sustainable futures, and the often-unrecognized labor of farmworkers and everyday people. The book asks who had-and who has-the power to shape the geography of one of the most watched regions in the world. As Silicon Valley's wealth dramatically transforms the look and feel of every corner of the region, like bankers' wealth did in the past, what do we need to remember about the people and places that have made the Bay Area, with its rich political legacies? With over 100 sites that you can visit and learn from, this book demonstrates critical ways of reading the landscape itself for clues to these histories. A useful companion for travelers, educators, or longtime residents, this guide links multicultural streets and lush hills to suburban cul-de-sacs and wetlands, stretching from the North Bay to the South Bay, from the East Bay to San Francisco. Original maps help guide readers, and thematic tours offer starting points for creating your own routes through the region.

Gender, Geography and Empire

Gender, Geography and Empire

Author: Cheryl McEwan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/10/2020

This title was first published 2000: This text is intended to draw together two important developments in contemporary geography: firstly, the recognition of the need to write critical histories of geographical thought and, particularly, the relationship between modern geography and European imperialism; and secondly, the attempt by feminist geographers to countervail the absence of women in the histories. The author focuses on the narratives of British women travellers in West Africa between 1840 and 1915, exploring their contributions to British imperial culture, teh ways in which they wer empowered in the imperial context by virtue of both race and class, and their various representations of West African landscapes and peoples. The book argues for the inclusion of women and their experiences in histories of geographical thought and explores the possibilities and problems of combining feminist and post-colonial approaches to these histories. This is an exploration of the contribution to geographical thought of 19th-century British women travellers in West Africa. Themes include imperial representation, empowerment and feminist and post-colonial approaches to histories of geographical thought. The book argues for the inclusion of women and their experiences in histories of geographical thought and explores the possibilities and problems of combining feminist and post-colonial approaches to histories of geographical thought.

Floating Coast

Floating Coast

Author: Bathsheba (Brown University) Demuth Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/09/2020

Across Russia's easternmost shores and through the territories of the Inupiat and Yupik in Alaska, Bathsheba Demuth reveals how, over 150 years, people turned ecological wealth in a remote region into economic growth and state power. Beginning in the 1840s, capitalism and then communism, with their ideas of progress, transformed the area around the Bering Strait into a historical experiment in remaking ecosystems. Rendered even more urgent in a warming climate, Floating Coast is a profoundly resonant tale of the impact that human needs and ambitions have brought (and will continue to bring) to a finite planet. * Shortlisted for the The Pushkin House Book Prize 2020.

Hooghly

Hooghly

Author: Robert Ivermee Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/09/2020

The Hooghly, a tributary of the Ganges flowing south to the Bay of Bengal, is now little known outside of India. Yet for centuries it was a river of truly global significance, attracting merchants, missionaries, mercenaries, statesmen, labourers and others from Europe, Asia and beyond. 'Hooghly' seeks to restore the waterway to the heart of global history. Focusing in turn on the role of and competition between those who struggled to control the river--the Portuguese, the Mughals, the Dutch, the French and finally the British, who built their imperial capital, Calcutta, on its banks--the author considers how the Hooghly was integrated into global networks of encounter and exchange, and the dramatic consequences that ensued. Travelling up and down the river, Robert Ivermee explores themes of enduring concern, among them the dynamics of modern capitalism and the power of large corporations; migration and human trafficking; the role of new technologies in revolutionising social relations; and the human impact on the natural world. The Hooghly's global history, he concludes, may offer lessons for India as it emerges as a world superpower.

Texas Place Names

Texas Place Names

Author: Edward Callary, Jean K. Callary Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/08/2020

Was Gasoline, Texas, named in honor of a gas station? Nope, but the name does honor the town's original claim to fame: a gasoline-powered cotton gin. Is Paris, Texas, a reference to Paris, France? Yes: Thomas Poteet, who donated land for the town site, thought it would be an improvement over Pin Hook, the original name of the Lamar County seat. Ding Dong's story has a nice ring to it; the name was derived from two store owners named Bell, who lived in Bell County, of course. Tracing the turning points, fascinating characters, and cultural crossroads that shaped Texas history, Texas Place Names provides the colorful stories behind these and more than three thousand other county, city, and community names. Drawing on in-depth research to present the facts behind the folklore, linguist Edward Callary also clarifies pronunciations (it's NAY-chis for Neches, referring to a Caddoan people whose name was attached to the Neches River during a Spanish expedition). A great resource for road trippers and historians alike, Texas Place Names alphabetically charts centuries of humanity through the enduring words (and, occasionally, the fateful spelling gaffes) left behind by men and women from all walks of life.

The English Lakes

The English Lakes

Author: Harriet Martineau Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2020

The Lake District was a popular tourist destination in the mid-Victorian period, and the changes it underwent following the arrival of the railway called for a new guide. Harriet Martineau (1802-76), a prolific and skilled writer on a wide variety of subjects, who had elsewhere written extensively to campaign for women's rights and against slavery in America, published this guide in 1858, having moved to the area. It offers a vivid insight into what is to be expected of a typical Victorian walking holiday, presenting a snapshot of the region at that time. Martineau describes everything from the landscape and views, to the hotels and amenities, nearby museums and exhibitions, and the personalities in the local community. Her descriptions are brought to life with illustrations and woodcuts by landscape artists, and the book also features essays by local experts on the meteorology, botany and geography of the region.

Across Iceland

Across Iceland

Author: William Bisiker Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2020

Although a member of the Royal Geographical Society, and author of a number of books on geography, little is known of William Bisiker. Published in 1902, this is an account of an expedition, led by him, across central Iceland in 1900. The five men and one woman journeyed from the north-east of the country down to the south-west, and the book also gives accounts of visits to the Faroe Islands and coastal journeys to the fjords. Including maps, photographs and an extensive appendix compiled by expedition member and botanist Arthur William Hill on the island's plant life, this work remains a detailed and engaging portrait. The impressions made upon the party by natural features such as geysers, quicksand and lava formations are vividly described, as are the visits to isolated settlements and farms. The chapter on Reykjavik covers the political situation in the country, still under Danish rule.

Historical Atlas of the American West

Historical Atlas of the American West

Author: Warren Beck, Ynez D. Haase Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/07/2020

The enduring image evoked by the American West is one of grand physical and historical romance, spectacle, and drama. Many generations of historians, both popular and academic, have sought to communication the unique characteristics of this region, whose history and physical setting have for so long captured the public imagination. In the Historical Atlas of the American West, a historian and a geographer meet this challenge by telling the story of the region from a comprehensive geographical perspective. Defining the American West as the seventeen contiguous states from the one-hundredth meridian westward (Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, California, Oregon, and Washington), Warren A. Beck and Ynez D. Haase provide seventy-eight maps, each with explanatory text and a selective bibliography of further readings.This atlas presents the history of the West from prehistoric times to the present. The physical characteristics of the region - its natural resources and geographic features, climatic zones, agricultural regions, mineral resources, and native flora fauna - are presented, along with special maps stressing the impact of natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, and the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Several maps provide unique views of Western Indians from ancient times to the latter part of the nineteenth century, including maps devoted to the tragedy at Wounded Knee, the Ghost Dance Religion, and Indian judicial districts. All the major explorations and overland movements in the region, as well as the evolution of transportation routes - from cattle trails to modern railroads - are depicted. The Spanish-Mexican land grants are presented in detail, with special emphasis on the early ranchos of Texas. Locations of important military events and installations, ranging from the Indian Wars of West to World War II POW camps, are recorded. Beck and Haase have thus succeeded in synthesizing and capsulizing a vast amount of information on the American West to create seventy-eight vignettes of uniquely western events and life ways from 1536 to 1980. Offering insights into the region's geography and the various groups that have populated the West over the centuries, this atlas will provide a valuable reference for scholars and fascinating entertainment for Western history buffs.

Historical Atlas of Central America

Historical Atlas of Central America

Author: Carolyn Hall, Hector Perez-Brignoli Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/07/2020

Central America has been a region of global importance since it was first explored by the Spanish early in the sixteenth century. Yet this mosaic of seven states, extending from Guatemala and Belize to Panama, remains one of the least known regions of Latin America. Drawing on more than fifty combined years of research and teaching in Central America, Carolyn Hall and Hector Perez Brignoli provide a new interpretation and an innovative synthesis of the region's history and culture in the Historical Atlas of Central America.The first two sections of the atlas review five centuries of territorial organization, demography, and culture. The final three sections focus on the economic, political, and social issues specific to each century, beginning with the colonial period and continuing to the present day. Lavishly illustrated with more than 140 color and black-and-white illustrations and more than 400 original full-color maps accompanied by explanatory and interpretive text, the Historical Atlas of Central America will serve as a landmark for future studies.

Earth's Notable Natural Disasters

Earth's Notable Natural Disasters

Author: Robert Carmichael Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/07/2020

This updated edition of Earth's Notable Natural Disasters: Events Affecting Mankind Through History combines clearly-explained scientific concepts with gripping narrative details about some of the worst disasters in history. Updated through 2016, it provides scientific and narrative analysis on events caused, at least in part, by uncontrollable forces of nature. Disasters covered include Avalanches, Blizzards, Droughts, Dust & Sand Storms, Earthquakes, El Nino, Epidemics, Explosions, Famines, Fires, Floods, Fog, Heat Waves, Hurricanes, Icebergs, Landslides, Lightning Strikes, Meteorites, Smog, Tornadoes, Tsunamis, Volcanic Eruptions and Wind Gusts. The set begins with disaster overviews by type. Each essay explains the disaster in scientific terms. First, a few sentences define the natural phenomenon and its importance. Then the factors involved (e.g. chemical reactions, ice, wind) and the regions affected (cities, coasts, forests) are listed. Subsections to overviews discuss the science behind the phenomenon lay terms. Sections such as Prevention and Preparations and Rescue and Relief Efforts further illuminate disasters. The Disasters The overviews are followed by entries on the 100 worst disasters in history. These narrative-style essays offer facts, figures, and interesting stories. Each event entry begins with a general description of location or the popular designation for the disaster, plus the most accurate date for the event Special Features/. A Glossary defines essential meteorological and geological terms, a Bibliography offers sources for more material about natural disasters, a list of Organizations and Agencies provides information about warning and relief efforts. The List of Entries by Category breaks the 100 events into disaster types, and the Geographical Index organizes the events by region, country, or state. A comprehensive subject Index concludes the volume.

The Spanish Colonial Settlement Landscapes of New Mexico, 1598-1680

The Spanish Colonial Settlement Landscapes of New Mexico, 1598-1680

Author: Elinore M. Barrett Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/07/2020

Presented for the first time is a detailed picture of the Spanish settlement landscape of New Mexico during the period from the beginning of colonisation in 1598 up to 1680 when the colonists were forced to retreat for a time. Despite scarcity of documentation, Barrett has pulled together the disparate material available from collections of published documents as well as genealogical and archaeological findings to craft a fine- grained analysis of the location of Spanish landholdings in the context of existing Pueblo village lands and the resources of the natural environment. Her study also includes discussion of the demographic dynamics of the period, the founding and settling of Santa Fe, and the activities of Spanish civil and religious establishments related to land, labour, and tribute. Barrett's work adds a much-needed dimension to colonial studies of this period.

Rooster Town

Rooster Town

Author: Evelyn Peters, Matthew Stock, Adrian Werner Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/07/2020

Melonville. Smokey Hollow. Bannock Town. Fort Tuyau. Little Chicago. Mud Flats. Pumpville. Tintown. La Coule. These were some of the names given to Metis communities at the edges of urban areas in Manitoba. Rooster Town, which was on the outskirts of southwest Winnipeg endured from 1901 to 1961.Those years in Winnipeg were characterized by the twin pressures of depression, and inflation, chronic housing shortages, and a spotty social support network. At the city's edge, Rooster Town grew without city services as rural Metis arrived to participate in the urban economy and build their own houses while keeping Metis culture and community as a central part of their lives.In other growing settler cities, the Indigenous experience was largely characterized by removal and confinement. But the continuing presence of Metis living and working in the city, and the establishment of Rooster Town itself, made the Winnipeg experience unique. Rooster Town documents the story of a community rooted in kinship, culture, and historical circumstance, whose residents existed unofficially in the cracks of municipal bureaucracy, while navigating the legacy of settler colonialism and the demands of modernity and urbanization.