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Maritime history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Maritime history category. Presented with a red border are the Maritime history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Maritime history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Mutiny on the Spanish Main

Mutiny on the Spanish Main

Author: Angus Konstam Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/10/2020

Mutiny on the Spanish Main tells the dramatic story of HMS Hermione, a British frigate which, in 1797, was the site of the bloodiest mutiny in British naval history, which saw the death of her captain and many of her officers. Though her crew handed her over to the Spanish, Hermione was subsequently recaptured in a daring raid on a Caribbean port two years later. Drawing on letters, reports, ship's logs and memoirs of the period, as well as previously unpublished Spanish sources, Angus Konstam intertwines extensive research with a fast-paced but balanced account of the mutiny and its consequences. Illustrated with maps and diagrams tracing the events as they unfolded, and supported by informative inserts on the technical and tactical nuances of seamanship and naval warfare in the period, this book is both a fascinating narrative retelling and an informative guide to one of the most notorious events in the history of the Royal Navy.

The Nautical Puzzle Book

The Nautical Puzzle Book

Author: The National Maritime Museum, Dr Gareth Moore Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/10/2020

Oceans cover most of the Earth's surface and represent a truly undiscovered world for most people. In The Nautical Puzzle Book, dive deep into life at sea and test yourself with The National Maritime Museum. Packed to the brim with hundreds of questions and a mix of mind-boggling maps, word games, trivia questions and much more. It's time to get on board and test your nautical skills and find out how much you really know about life at sea. You'll be challenged to: - Find out the different between a boat and ship - Chart shipping lanes around the world - Identify different knots - Understand naval terms The perfect gift for veteran seafarers and armchair navigators alike. Find out if you're worthy of captaincy or destined to be a deck hand in this beautiful and addictive puzzle book!

Guiding Lights

Guiding Lights

Author: Shona Riddell Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/10/2020

Women have a long history of keeping the lights burning, from tending ancient altar flames or bonfires to modern-day lighthouse keeping. Yet most of their stories are little-known. Guiding Lights includes stories from around the world, such as the dramatic torching of Puysegur Point, one of New Zealand's most inhospitable lighthouses; the two caretakers living alone on Tasmania's wild Maatsuyker Island; the female keeper in charge of Cape Beale on Canada's Vancouver Island (the station receives visits from bears, cougars and wolves); several 'haunted' lighthouses in various US states with tragic tales; the despotic keeper on Clipperton Island, a tiny atoll far off the coast of Mexico; lighthouse accidents and emergencies around the world; and two of the world's most legendary lighthouse women: Ida Lewis (US) and Grace Darling (UK), who risked their lives to save others. The book also explores our dual perception of lighthouses: are they comforting and romantic beacons symbolising hope and trust, or storm-lashed and forbidding towers with echoes of lonely, mad keepers? Whatever our perception, stories of women's courage and dedication in minding the lights - then and now - continue to capture the public's imagination and inspire us.

Sailing East

Sailing East

Author: Phyllis Hunter Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/10/2020

The 1784 voyage of the Empress of China, the first American trade ship to China, marked a critical moment in the economic, cultural and diplomatic development of the United States. In the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, the American economy was still reeling, and the government struggled to stake its claim within the balance of global power. It was crucially important that the U.S. develop trade as a newly independent nation-no longer a satellite of the British Empire, but a full-fledged participant in international commerce. With this in mind, a group of financiers in Philadelphia, New York and Boston launched the first shipping venture to China. Sailing East tells the story of the financiers that initiated the enterprise, the sailors that actually made the dramatic voyage, and the impact the China trade had on early America. As Hunter shows, capital from the China trade financed important early manufacturing and transportation ventures, such as cotton factories, life insurance companies and what would became the Pennsylvania Railroad. The trade had an important cultural influence as well, as Chinoiserie and Asian objects became coveted among the upper classes, and Americans developed an appetite for Chinese teas, silk, porcelain and other exotic luxury goods. Most importantly, though, trade across the Pacific marked the young nation's entry onto the global stage. As this book proves, the voyage of the Empress of China was a pivotal first step towards both the global commerce of the world today, as well as America's eventual role as an economic superpower.

The Boundless Sea

The Boundless Sea

Author: David Abulafia Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2020

WINNER OF THE WOLFSON HISTORY PRIZE 2020 A SUNDAY TIMES, FINANCIAL TIMES, THE TIMES AND BBC HISTORY MAGAZINE BOOK OF THE YEAR For most of human history, the seas and oceans have been the main means of long-distance trade and communication between peoples - for the spread of ideas and religion as well as commerce. This book traces the history of human movement and interaction around and across the world's greatest bodies of water, charting our relationship with the oceans from the time of the first voyagers. David Abulafia begins with the earliest of seafaring societies - the Polynesians of the Pacific, the possessors of intuitive navigational skills long before the invention of the compass, who by the first century were trading between their far-flung islands. By the seventh century, trading routes stretched from the coasts of Arabia and Africa to southern China and Japan, bringing together the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific and linking half the world through the international spice trade. In the Atlantic, centuries before the little kingdom of Portugal carved out its powerful, seaborne empire, many peoples sought new lands across the sea - the Bretons, the Frisians and, most notably, the Vikings, now known to be the first Europeans to reach North America. As Portuguese supremacy dwindled in the late sixteenth century, the Spanish, the Dutch and then the British each successively ruled the waves. Following merchants, explorers, pirates, cartographers and travellers in their quests for spices, gold, ivory, slaves, lands for settlement and knowledge of what lay beyond, Abulafia has created an extraordinary narrative of humanity and the oceans. From the earliest forays of peoples in hand-hewn canoes through uncharted waters to the routes now taken daily by supertankers in their thousands, The Boundless Sea shows how maritime networks came to form a continuum of interaction and interconnection across the globe: 90 per cent of global trade is still conducted by sea. This is history of the grandest scale and scope, and from a bracingly different perspective - not, as in most global histories, from the land, but from the boundless seas.

Kings Customs

Kings Customs

Author: Henry Atton, Henry H. Holland Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2020

First Published in 1968. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Royal Greenwich

Royal Greenwich

Author: Pieter Van der Merwe Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/09/2020

Treasure Islands

Treasure Islands

Author: Alec Crawford Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/09/2020

In 1971 Alec Crawford is determined to make his fortune from ship salvage. Early attempts lead nowhere until he teams up with a new partner, Simon Martin. Diving in Hebridean waters, they explore remains of the Spanish Armada, and the wreck of the SS Politician, the vessel made famous in the Whisky Galore. But money is scarce and irregular, and the work is fraught with danger and disappointment. Until they hear of one of the most incredible wrecks of all time - the White Star Liner Oceanic, which, when built in 1899, was the biggest and most luxurious ship in the world. Widely regarded as an 'undiveable' wreck, lying somewhere off the remote island of Foula, they decide to take the challenge. They face unbelievably dangerous waters and appalling weather conditions, and when a large salvage company takes action against them, they also have a huge legal fight on their hands. But if they succeed, the rewards will be enormous...

Light Over Lundy

Light Over Lundy

Author: Myrtle Ternstrom Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2020

Set atop the rocky plateau of Lundy Island in the Bristol Channel, the Old Light stands proudly - a monument to the skill of its builder, Joseph Nelson. It is of a pleasing construction, both solid and graceful, and when built in 1820 it had two lights - an upper and a lower, and was the highest lighthouse in the country. In this fascinating history of the old lighthouse and the fog signal station, the author has combined her wide knowledge of the island's history with information gleaned from extensive research into Trinity House's archives. Some tantalising insights into the life of the keepers and their families have emerged - the keeper who was too tall for the lantern room; the keeper's wife who tragically died of water contamination, and the gunners who poached their dinners and hid their numerous children when the Elder Brethren came to inspect the cottages! Interwoven throughout the story are details of the numerous wrecks from the 15th century until 1897. Accounts from newspapers are often included, and the wrecks are linked to the lighthouse keepers of the time and the heroic rescues performed by the lighthouse staff. There are also some wonderful snippets of island history - one owner regarded Lundy as independent of mainland authorities and issued his own 'puffin' coins and stamps - the latter are still in use to cover postage to the mainland although the coins are now collectors' items. The height of the Old Light soon proved to be its downfall and eventually the reason why it was extinguished. Due to Lundy's plateau-top fogs which completely obscured the lantern, although there was clear visibility at ground level, a programme of alterations and intensifications took place under the advice of Professor Faraday. In 1862, a fog signal station was built on the west coast, providing shipping with another warning. This was not wholly successful either and it was not until 1897 that the Old Light was replaced by new lights on lower levels at the north and south ends of the island. Since the light was extinguished, the Old Light and the fog signal station reverted to the owners. The Landmark Trust restored the lighthouse and holiday-makers can now stay in the keepers' quarters, climb the 147 steps to the lantern room, and enjoy the breathtaking views across the whole island to the coasts of Wales and Cornwall. Owned by the National Trust, Lundy Island is an outstanding area of great natural beauty which attracts many visitors, who frequently return year after year to enjoy this special place.

Admiral Lord St. Vincent - Saint or Tyrant?

Admiral Lord St. Vincent - Saint or Tyrant?

Author: James D G Davidson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2020

This biography of John Jervis, who became Admiral Lord Vincent, makes compelling reading. It throws an oblique light on Nelsons personality. St Vincent, who was born twenty-three years before Nelson, and survived for eighteen years after Trafalgar, fundamentally influenced the younger mans career despite the two men being diametrically different characters. Yet without him, Nelsons genius might have been submerged by professional jealousy or emotional fragility. It was St Vincents strategy and preparation which positioned Nelson to win his three famous victories, but St Vincent himself made vital contributions not only to the defeat of Napoleon but to the well-being of the Royal Navy. Before he became First Lord of the Admiralty, the Navy had been severely weakened by corruption in the dockyards, nepotism in appointments and the appalling conditions under which the seamen lived and worked. St Vincent deserves the profound gratitude of the Nation; not only for enabling Nelson to exercise his tactical brilliance, but also for the role he played in preventing Napoleon from invading the British Isles.

Bound for the East Indies

Bound for the East Indies

Author: Andrew Norman Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2020

The loss of East Indiaman HCS `Halsewell' on the coast of Dorset in southern England in January 1786, touched the very heart of the British nation. `Halsewell' was just one of many hundreds of vessels which had been in the service of the Honourable East India Company since its foundation in the year 1600. In the normal course of events, `Halsewell' would have been expected to serve out her working life, before passing unnoticed into the history books. However, this was not to be. Halsewell's loss was an event of such pathos as to inspire the greatest writer of the age Charles Dickens, to put pen to paper; the greatest painter of the age J. M. W. Turner, to apply brush to canvas, and the King and Queen to pay homage at the very place where the catastrophe occurred. Artefacts from the wreck continue to be recovered to this very day which, and for variety, interest, curiosity, and exoticism, rival those recovered from Spanish armada galleons wrecked off the west coast of Ireland two centuries previously. Such artefacts shed further light both on `Halsewell' herself, and on the extraordinary lives of those who sailed in her.

The History of the British U Class Submarine

The History of the British U Class Submarine

Author: Derek Walters Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2020

Original designed in 1934 for anti-submarine training, by the end of the war seventy-two U-Class subs had been commissioned. Seventeen were lost to the enemy and three in accidents. Manned by crews from seven nations' navies, they served world-wide and never more successfully than in the Med, where they made a major contribution to the defeat of Rommel's Afrika Corps. The quality of their service is born out by the 375 gallantry medals awarded to crewmen including Lt Cdr David Wanklyn's VC.