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Social & cultural history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social & cultural history category. Presented with a red border are the Social & cultural history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social & cultural history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Employers and Labour in the English Textile Industries, 1850-1939

Employers and Labour in the English Textile Industries, 1850-1939

Author: J. A. Jowitt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/05/2020

First published in 1988. This collection of essays examines aspects of labour and industrial relations history in the textiles sector of Northern England during the mature phase of industrialisation before World War One and the period of retrenchment during the interwar economic recession. There are chapters on wool, worsted, silk, cotton spinning and weaving, and cotton finishing. The volume includes contributions by historians interested in employers' organisations and management strategies, labour, trade union and women's history. As such it provides a broader framework in which relationships between capital and labour are analysed. The book also incorporates some of the recent research on particularly neglected areas of social history, most notably on women workers and on the industrial relations policies of employers in textiles.

Women Art Workers and the Arts and Crafts Movement

Women Art Workers and the Arts and Crafts Movement

Author: Zoe Thomas Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/05/2020

This book constitutes the first comprehensive history of the network of women who worked at the heart of the English Arts and Crafts movement from the 1870s to the 1930s. Challenging the long-standing assumption that the Arts and Crafts simply revolved around celebrated male designers like William Morris, it instead offers a new social and cultural account of the movement, which simultaneously reveals the breadth of the imprint of women art workers upon the making of modern society. Thomas provides unprecedented insight into how women navigated authoritative roles as 'art workers' by asserting expertise across a range of interconnected cultures: from the artistic to the professional, intellectual, entrepreneurial and domestic. Through examination of newly discovered institutional archives and private papers, Thomas elucidates the critical importance of the spaces around which women conceptualised alternative creative and professional lifestyles. -- .

Painted Faces A Colourful History of Cosmetics

Painted Faces A Colourful History of Cosmetics

Author: Susan Stewart Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/05/2020

Throughout history, women (and men) have applied make-up to enhance, alter, conceal and even to disguise their appearance. Also, to a greater or lesser degree over time, cosmetics have been used as a visible marker of social status, gender, wealth and well-being. A closer look at the world of make-up gives us not only a mirror reflecting day-to-day life in the past, but also an indicator of the culture and politics of earlier periods in history. Susan Stewart guides the reader through the bewildering, fascinating and complex story of cosmetics, from the ancient world to the present day. Anyone who has ever wondered how the Romans used algae to colour their faces and urine to whiten their teeth, how Radium came to be a popular 1930s beauty trend, or how make-up survived the war will enjoy this colourful journey through the human obsession with improving how we look.

The Polymath A Cultural History from Leonardo da Vinci to Susan Sontag

The Polymath A Cultural History from Leonardo da Vinci to Susan Sontag

Author: Peter Burke Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/05/2020

The remarkable story of Western polymaths from the fifteenth century to the present day From Leonardo da Vinci and John Dee to Oliver Sacks and Susan Sontag, polymaths have moved the frontiers of knowledge. Nonetheless, in our current age of specialization, polymaths are often remembered for only one part of their varied achievements. Renowned cultural historian Peter Burke examines the achievements of five hundred Western polymaths from the Renaissance to the present. Burke shows how the rise of the polymath went hand in hand with the rapid growth of knowledge in the age of the invention of printing, the discovery of the New World, and the Scientific Revolution. He also argues that the further growth of knowledge led to the rise of specialization and so to an environment that has become less and less supportive of wide-ranging scholars and scientists.

The Little Book of Pride The History, the People, the Parades

The Little Book of Pride The History, the People, the Parades

Author: Lewis Laney Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/05/2020

Celebrate the LGTBQ community with this small but perfectly formed guide to Pride. What began as a protest for gay rights following the Stonewall riots of 1969 in New York has grown to become a global celebration of LGBTQ culture. In the 50-odd years since the original protest, and what is now widely accepted to be the first Pride march - Christopher Street Liberation Day, 1970 - Pride events are now attended by millions each year, celebrating how far we've come, recognising where we have to go and highlighting important causes in the queer community. The Little Book of Pride is a concise look at everything you need to know about Pride, revealing the history, the key people involved, the best Pride events around the world, inspirational quotes from famous queers, Pride facts and a fun Pride survival guide.

Transport and its Place in History Making the Connections

Transport and its Place in History Making the Connections

Author: David (University of York, UK) Turner Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/05/2020

Transport and mobility history is one of the most exciting areas of historical research at the present. As its scope expands, it entices scholars working in fields as diverse as historical geography, management studies, sociology, industrial archaeology, cultural and literary studies, ethnography, and anthropology, as well as those working in various strands of historical research. Containing contributions exploring transport and mobility history after 1800, this volume of eclectic chapters shows how new subjects are explored, new sources are being encountered, considered and used, and how increasingly diverse and innovative methodological lenses are applied to both new and well-travelled subjects. From canals to Concorde, from freight to passengers, from screen to literature, the contents of this book will therefore not only demonstrate the cutting edge of research, and deliver valuable new insights into the role and position of transport and mobility in history, but it will also evidence the many and varied directions and possibilities that exist for the field's future development.

The Life and Death of Ancient Cities A Natural History

The Life and Death of Ancient Cities A Natural History

The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and fallen many times in history. The ruins of many of them still enchant us. This book tells the story of the rise and fall of ancient cities from the end of the Bronze Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. It is a tale of war and politics, pestilence and famine, triumph and tragedy, by turns both fabulous and squalid. Its focus is on the ancient Mediterranean: Greeks and Romans at the centre, but Phoenicians and Etruscans, Persians, Gauls, and Egyptians all play a part. The story begins with the Greek discovery of much more ancient urban civilizations in Egypt and the Near East, and charts the gradual spread of urbanism to the Atlantic and then the North Sea in the centuries that followed. The ancient Mediterranean, where our story begins, was a harsh environment for urbanism. So how were cities first created, and then sustained for so long, in these apparently unpromising surroundings? How did they feed themselves, where did they find water and building materials, and what did they do with their waste and their dead? Why, in the end, did their rulers give up on them? And what it was like to inhabit urban worlds so unlike our own - cities plunged into darkness every night, cities dominated by the temples of the gods, cities of farmers, cities of slaves, cities of soldiers. Ultimately, the chief characters in the story are the cities themselves. Athens and Sparta, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Alexandria: cities that formed great families. Their story encompasses the history of the generations of people who built and inhabited them, whose short lives left behind monuments that have inspired city builders ever since - and whose ruins stand as stark reminders to the 21st century of the perils as well as the potential rewards of an urban existence.

Lev's Violin An Italian Adventure

Lev's Violin An Italian Adventure

Author: Helena Attlee Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/05/2020

From the moment she hears Lev's violin for the first time, Helena Attlee is captivated. She is told that it is an Italian instrument, named after its former Russian owner. Eager to discover all she can about its ancestry, and the stories contained within its delicate wooden body, she sets out for its birthplace, Cremona, once the hometown of famous luthier Antonio Stradivari. This is the beginning of a beguiling journey whose end she could never have anticipated. Making its way from the cobbled streets of sixteenth-century Cremona, through cool churches, glittering courts, and little coastal opera houses, Lev's Violin takes us from the heart of Italian culture to its very furthest reaches. Its tale of princes and orphans, virtuosos and fraudsters, collectors, composers, travellers and raconteurs, swells to an enrapturing meditation on the power of objects, stories and music to shape individual lives and craft entire cultures.

Republic of Shame Stories from Ireland's Institutions for 'Fallen Women'

Republic of Shame Stories from Ireland's Institutions for 'Fallen Women'

Author: Caelainn Hogan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/05/2020

'At least in The Handmaid's Tale they value babies, mostly. Not so in the true stories here.' Margaret Atwood Until alarmingly recently, the Catholic Church, acting in concert with the Irish state, operated a network of institutions for the concealment, punishment and exploitation of 'fallen women'. In the Magdalene laundries, girls and women were incarcerated and condemned to servitude. And in the mother-and-baby homes, women who had become pregnant out of wedlock were hidden from view, and in most cases their babies were adopted - sometimes illegally. Mortality rates in these institutions were shockingly high, and the discovery of a mass infant grave at the mother-and-baby home in Tuam made news all over the world. The Irish state has commissioned investigations. But the workings of the institutions and of the culture that underpinned it - a shame-industrial complex - have long been cloaked in secrecy and silence. For countless people, a search for answers continues. Caelainn Hogan - a brilliant young journalist, born in an Ireland that was only just starting to free itself from the worst excesses of Catholic morality - has been talking to the survivors of the institutions, to members of the religious orders that ran them, and to priests and bishops. She has visited the sites of the institutions, and studied Church and state documents that have much to reveal about how they operated. Reporting and writing with great curiosity, tenacity and insight, she has produced a startling and often moving account of how an entire society colluded in this repressive system, and of the damage done to survivors and their families. In the great tradition of Anna Funder's Stasiland and Barbara Demick's Nothing to Envy: Real Lives in North Korea - both winners of the Samuel Johnson Prize - Republic of Shame is an astounding portrait of a deeply bizarre culture of control. '[A] furious, necessary book' Sinead Gleeson 'Achingly powerful ... There will be many people who don't want to read Republic of Shame, for fear it will be too much, too dark, too heavy. Please don't be afraid. Read it. Look it in the eye' Irish Times 'A must read for everyone' Lynn Ruane 'Republic of Shame is a careful, sensitive and extremely well-written book - but it is harrowing. It would break your heart in two' Ailbhe Smyth 'Hogan's captivatingly written stories of people who were consigned to what she calls the shame-industrial complex puts faces - many old now, and lined with pain - to the clinical data. ... Brilliant' Sunday Times 'Utterly brilliant. Please read it' Marian Keyes 'Riveting, immensely insightful and horrifically recognisable' Emma Dabiri 'Compelling ... devastatingly human, [Republic of Shame] will make you shake with sadness and anger' RTE Guide '[A] sensitive, can't-look-away book ... Through moving stories, Hogan shows how the past is still present' NPR 'A beautifully written and impeccably researched book ... We need more books like this' Caitriona Palmer 'A vital and damning portrait of Ireland's mother and baby homes' GCN.ie 'I've laughed, cried & RAGED reading this book' Taryn De Vere 'Caelainn's book brings real people to the fore' Hot Press 'A gripping, eye-opening and challenging read ... Hogan sheds light on the darkest corners of our recent history in Ireland, but also holds up a mirror to today' Dublin Inquirer 'Caelainn Hogan's harrowing account of the shame industrial complex shows how the legacy of Ireland's treatment of fallen women remains part of the scenery of modern life' Totally Dublin 'For anyone interested in understanding modern Ireland. A compelling and beautifully written investigation into institutions for fallen women and the culture which facilitated them' Siobhan Fenton

Citizen Woman: An Illustrated History of the Women's Movement

Citizen Woman: An Illustrated History of the Women's Movement

Author: Jane Gerhard Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/05/2020

One hundred years ago American women fought for and won an equal voice at the ballot box with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. This happened thanks to the unrelenting activism of women in the US and around the rest of the world, who shifted the notion of women's suffrage from fringe idea to reality. Although that was a huge achievement, successive generations of global activists have had to combat enormous gaps in women's rights that have continued to exist today. The first of its kind, this fully illustrated history of women's rights offers a gripping account of the struggle for equality across the globe. In six chapters it covers issues that are critical to women everywhere: the right to vote, reproductive freedom, marital and property rights, workplace equality, oppressive notions of beauty, racial equality, and LGBTQ rights. 'Citizen Woman' takes readers across continents to compare and contrast how women are faring in different cultures and societies. Each chapter is generously illustrated with photographs, archival materials, and documents that provide rich context and helps readers connect deeply with the personal and historic achievements of the past and present. This satisfying and engrossing overview of the women's rights movement offers compelling proof that change is possible for every citizen of the world.

The Children of Ash and Elm A History of the Vikings

The Children of Ash and Elm A History of the Vikings

Author: Neil Price Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/05/2020

The Viking Age - between 750 and 1050 - saw an unprecedented expansion of the Scandinavian peoples. As traders and raiders, explorers and colonists, they reshaped the world between eastern North America and the Asian steppe. For a millennium, though, their history has largely been filtered through the writings of their victims. Based on the latest archaeological and textual evidence, The Children of Ash and Elm tells the story of the Vikings on their own terms: their politics, their cosmology, their art and culture. From Bjoern Ironside, who led an expedition to sack Rome, to Gudrid Thorbjarnardottir, the most travelled woman in the world, Price shows us the real Vikings, not the caricatures they have become in popular culture and history.

Le Boogie Woogie Inside an After-Hours Club

Le Boogie Woogie Inside an After-Hours Club

Author: Terry Williams Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/05/2020

The after-hours club is a fixture of the African American ghetto. It is a semisecret, unlicensed spot where regulars and tourists mingle with hustlers to buy and use drugs long after regular bars are closed and the party has ended for the squares. After-hours clubs are found in most cities, but for people outside of their particular milieu, they are formidably difficult to identify and even more difficult to access. The sociologist Terry Williams returns to the cocaine culture of Harlem in the 1980s and '90s with an ethnographic account of a club he calls Le Boogie Woogie. He explores the life of a cast of characters that includes regulars and bar workers, dealers and hustlers, following social interaction around the club's active bar, with its colorful staff and owner and the sniffers who patronize it. In so doing, Williams delves into the world of after-hours clubs, exploring their longstanding function in the African American community as neighborhood institutions and places of autonomy for people whom mainstream society grants few spaces of freedom. He contrasts Le Boogie Woogie, which he visited in the 1990s, with a Lower East Side club, dubbed Murphy's Bar, twenty years later to show how cool remains essential to those outside the margins of society even as what it means to be cool changes. Le Boogie Woogie is an exceptional ethnographic portrait of an underground culture and its place within a changing city.