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Social & cultural history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Social & cultural history category. Presented with a red border are the Social & cultural history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Social & cultural history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Bad Trip Dark Stars, Blown Minds and the Strange End of the Sixties

The Bad Trip Dark Stars, Blown Minds and the Strange End of the Sixties

Author: James Riley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/08/2019

The Sixties, for many, was a time of new ideas, freedom, and renewed hope - from the civil rights movement to Woodstock. But it all seemed to implode towards the end of 1969 and early 1970 amidst the Manson murders, the Zodiac Killer, and the tragic events of the Rolling Stones' concert at Altamont. With that, the hippie dream died - or so the story goes. In The Bad Trip, James Riley explores the dark side of the counterculture, arguing that a seam of apocalyptic thinking lay just beneath the decade's psychedelic utopianism all along. This is a magical mystery tour, exploring our concept of `the Sixties' as substantially different from the reality of that period. A brilliant and trenchant cultural history published 50 years after the action - drawing on interviews with key figures from the music, art, and film scenes of the late 1960s and early 1970s in the US and UK.

Hollow Places A Tree, a Stone, a Story, a Name

Hollow Places A Tree, a Stone, a Story, a Name

Author: Christopher Hadley Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/08/2019

Do you wonder where dragons once lurked and where local fairies baked their loaves? Or where wolves were trapped, and suicides buried? Did people in the past really believe the marvellous stories they told, and can those beliefs and stories still teach us something about how to live today? These questions lie at the heart of Christopher Hadley's Hollow Places as it searches through the centuries for the truth behind the legend of Piers Shonks, a giant from a village in Hertfordshire, who slew a dragon that once had its lair under an ancient yew in a field called Great Pepsells. Hollow Places takes us to the margins of the Bayeux Tapestry where strange creatures gather, to ancient woodland where hollow trees hide secrets, to eighteenth-century manuscripts where antiquaries scribbled clues to the identity of folk heroes. Hadley leads us back shivering to a church in Georgian England, to sketch the dragon on a tomb, to stand atop its tower triangulating the Elizabethan countryside, and to confront the zealous Mr Dowsing and his thugs looting the brasses and smashing the masonry during the Civil War. This enchanting book asks why Churchwarden Morris could not sleep at night, and how long bones last in a crypt, and where a medieval stonemason found his inspiration. The story of Piers Shonks is the survivor of an 800-year battle between storytellers and those who would mock or silence them. It stands for all those thousands of seemingly forgotten tales that used to belong to every village. It is an adventure into the past by a talented and original new writer, and a meditation on memory and belief that underlines the importance and the power of the folk legends we used to tell and why they still matter.

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Author: Jim Sharpe Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/08/2019

Witchcraft in Early Modern England provides a fascinating introduction to the history of witches and witchcraft in England from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. Witchcraft was a crime punishable by death in England during this period and this book charts the witch panics and legal persecution of witches that followed, exploring topics such as elite attitudes to witchcraft in England, the role of pressures and tensions within the community in accusations of witchcraft, the way in which the legal system dealt with witchcraft cases, and the complex decline of belief in witchcraft. Revised and updated, this new edition explores the modern historiographical debate surrounding this subject and incorporates recent findings and interpretations of historians in the field, bringing it right up-to-date and in particular offering an extended treatment of the difficult issues surrounding gender and witchcraft. Supported by a range of compelling primary documents, this book is essential reading for all students of the history of witchcraft.

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Witchcraft in Early Modern England

Author: Jim Sharpe Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/08/2019

Witchcraft in Early Modern England provides a fascinating introduction to the history of witches and witchcraft in England from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. Witchcraft was a crime punishable by death in England during this period and this book charts the witch panics and legal persecution of witches that followed, exploring topics such as elite attitudes to witchcraft in England, the role of pressures and tensions within the community in accusations of witchcraft, the way in which the legal system dealt with witchcraft cases, and the complex decline of belief in witchcraft. Revised and updated, this new edition explores the modern historiographical debate surrounding this subject and incorporates recent findings and interpretations of historians in the field, bringing it right up-to-date and in particular offering an extended treatment of the difficult issues surrounding gender and witchcraft. Supported by a range of compelling primary documents, this book is essential reading for all students of the history of witchcraft.

Silver Shoals Five Fish That Made Britain

Silver Shoals Five Fish That Made Britain

Author: Charles Rangeley-Wilson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/2019

On these rain-swept islands in the North Atlantic man and fish go back a long way. Fish are woven through the fabric of the country's history: we depend on them - for food, for livelihood and for fun - and now their fate depends on us in a relationship which has become more complex, passionate and precarious in the sophisticated 21st Century. In Silver Shoals Charles Rangeley-Wilson travels north, south, east and west through the British Isles tracing the histories, living and past, of our most iconic fish - cod, carp, eels, salmon and herring - and of the fishermen who catch them and care for them. In the company of trawlermen, longshoremen, conservationists and anglers Charles goes to sea in a trawler, whiles away hot afternoons setting eel nets, tries to bag his first elusive carp and drifts for herring on Guy Fawkes night as fireworks starburst the sky. Underscoring this journey is a fascinating historical exploration of these creatures that have shaped our island story. We learn how abundant and valued these fish were centuries before our current crisis of over-fishing: we learn how eels built our monasteries, how cod sank the Spanish Armada, how fish and chips helped us through two World Wars. Of course there is a deeper environmental dimension to the story, but Charles' optimistic perspective is this: no one is more invested in fish than the fishermen whose lives depend on them. If we can find a way to harness that passion then the future of fish and fishermen in Britain could be as extraordinary as its past.

Life of the Indigenous Mind Vine Deloria Jr. and the Birth of the Red Power Movement

Life of the Indigenous Mind Vine Deloria Jr. and the Birth of the Red Power Movement

Author: David Martinez Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/08/2019

In Life of the Indigenous Mind David Martinez examines the early activism, life, and writings of Vine Deloria Jr. (1933-2005), the most influential indigenous activist and writer of the twentieth century and one of the intellectual architects of the Red Power movement. An experienced activist, administrator, and political analyst, Deloria was motivated to activism and writing by his work as executive director of the National Congress of American Indians, and he came to view discourse on tribal self-determination as the most important objective for making a viable future for tribes. In this work of both intellectual and activist history, Martinez assesses the early life and legacy of Deloria's Red Power Tetralogy, his most powerful and polemical works: Custer Died for Your Sins (1969), We Talk, You Listen (1970), God Is Red (1973), and Behind the Trail of Broken Treaties (1974). Deloria's gift for combining sharp political analysis with a cutting sense of humor rattled his adversaries as much as it delighted his growing readership. Life of the Indigenous Mind reveals how Deloria's writings addressed Indians and non-Indians alike. It was in the spirit of protest that Deloria famously and infamously confronted the tenets of Christianity, the policies of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the theories of anthropology. The concept of tribal self-determination that he initiated both overturned the presumptions of the dominant society, including various Indian experts, and asserted that tribes were entitled to the rights of independent sovereign nations in their relationship with the United States, be it legally, politically, culturally, historically, or religiously.

Negotiating Insanity in the Southeast of Ireland, 1820-1900

Negotiating Insanity in the Southeast of Ireland, 1820-1900

Author: Catherine Cox Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/2019

This book explores local medical, lay and legal negotiations with the asylum system in nineteenth-century Ireland. It deepens our understanding of attitudes towards the mentally ill and institutional provision for the care and containment of people diagnosed as insane. Uniquely, it expands the analytical focus beyond asylums incorporating the impact that the Irish poor law, petty session courts and medical dispensaries had on the provision of services. It provides insights into life in asylums for patients and staff. The study uses Carlow asylum district - comprised of counties Wexford, Kildare, Kilkenny and Carlow in the southeast of Ireland - to explore the 'place of the asylum' in the period. This book will be useful for scholars of nineteenth-century Ireland, the history of psychiatry and medicine in Britain and Ireland, Irish studies and gender studies. -- .

Palaces of Power The Birth and Evolution of London's Clubland

Palaces of Power The Birth and Evolution of London's Clubland

Author: Stephen Hoare Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/08/2019

Palaces of Power charts the evolution of London's clubland, St James's, by exploring the social and cultural history of the city's most prestigious district, and explores the tensions between the world of privilege and an emerging public realm over three centuries. The core of what we call St James's dates from the late seventeenth century, when large estates were leased by the Crown to the landed gentry after the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660. St James's clubs, coffee houses and institutions were shaped by political conflicts between Whig and Tory, and between the Jacobite supporters seeking to revive a Stuart monarchy following the protestant Hanoverian succession. Clubland's institutions echo the conflicts of the Napoleonic wars and the rise of dandyism, gambling, and prostitution. By the Victorian era, St James's represented Britain's emerging role as an Imperial power. This sparked the rise of a new cosmopolitan middle class for whom St James's became a luxury shopping destination, offering a decadent West End nightlife, complete with an array of now-famous clubs, the history of which appear in these pages.

The Grimy 1800s Waste, Sewage, and Sanitation in Nineteenth Century Britain

The Grimy 1800s Waste, Sewage, and Sanitation in Nineteenth Century Britain

Author: Andre Gren Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2019

In the nineteenth century, as towns grew, Britain became increasingly grimy. The causes of dirt and pollution were defined legally as 'nuisances' and, in 1835, the new local authorities very rapidly appointed an army of 'inspectors of nuisances'. This book is the inspectors' chronicle: it offers their eye-witness accounts and a plethora of details pertaining to the workings of the scrutinising Parliamentary Committees that were set up in an attempt to ease the struggles against filth. Inspectors battled untreated human excreta in rivers black as ink, as well as insanitary drinking water, home to tadpoles and portions of frogs so large that they blocked taps. They dealt with putrid animal carcases in cattle markets and slaughter-houses, not to mention the unabated smoke from mill chimneys that covered towns with a thick layer of black grime. Boggle Hole Pond was a source of drinking water full of dead dogs; ice cream was coated in bugs; stinking rotting crabs, poultry and pigeon smells polluted the air. Even the dead floating out of badly drained burial grounds were 'nuisances', leading to the practice of burning the remains of the dead. This is the history of a grimy century in the throes of the Industrial Revolution, illustrating the many ways in which the country responded to the ever growing demands of a new age of industry.

Feeling the Strain A Cultural History of Stress in Twentieth-Century Britain

Feeling the Strain A Cultural History of Stress in Twentieth-Century Britain

Author: Jill Kirby Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/07/2019

Examining the popular discourse of nerves and stress, this book provides a historical account of how ordinary Britons understood, explained and coped with the pressures and strains of daily life during the twentieth century. It traces the popular, vernacular discourse of stress, illuminating not just how stress was known, but the ways in which that knowledge was produced. Taking a cultural approach, the book focuses on contemporary popular understandings, revealing continuity of ideas about work, mental health, status, gender and individual weakness, as well as the changing socio-economic contexts that enabled stress to become a ubiquitous condition of everyday life by the end of the century. With accounts from sufferers, families and colleagues it also offers insight into self-help literature, the meanings of work and changing dynamics of domestic life, delivering a complementary perspective to medical histories of stress. -- .

Convicts in the Colonies Transportation Tales from Britain to Australia

Convicts in the Colonies Transportation Tales from Britain to Australia

Author: Lucy Williams Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2019

In the eighty years between 1787 and 1868 more than 160,000 men, women and children convicted of everything from picking pockets to murder were sentenced to be transported beyond the seas'. These convicts were destined to serve out their sentences in the empire's most remote colony: Australia. Through vivid real-life case studies and famous tales of the exceptional and extraordinary, Convicts in the Colonies narrates the history of convict transportation to Australia - from the first to the final fleet. Using the latest original research, Convicts in the Colonies reveals a fascinating century-long history of British convicts unlike any other. Covering everything from crime and sentencing in Britain and the perilous voyage to Australia, to life in each of the three main penal colonies - New South Wales, Van Diemen's Land, and Western Australia - this book charts the lives and experiences of the men and women who crossed the world and underwent one of the most extraordinary punishment in history.

Exploring the Lives of Women, 1558-1837

Exploring the Lives of Women, 1558-1837

Author: Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2019

Exploring the Lives of Women, 1558-1837' is an engaging and lively collection of original, thought-provoking essays. Its route from Lady Jane Grey's nine-day reign to Queen Victoria's accession provides ample opportunities to examine complex interactions between gender, rank, and power. Yet the book's scope extends far beyond queens: its female cast includes servants, aristocrats, literary women, opera singers, actresses, fallen women, athletes and mine workers. The collection explores themes relating to female power and physical strength; infertility, motherhood, sexuality and exploitation; creativity and celebrity; marriage and female friendship. It draws upon a wide range of primary materials to explore diverse representations of women: illuminating accounts of real women's lives appear alongside fictional portrayals and ideological constructions of femininity. In exploring women's negotiations with patriarchal control, this book demonstrates how the lived experience of women did not always correspond to prescribed social and gendered norms, revealing the rich complexity of their lives. This volume has been published to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Women's Studies Group 1558-1837\. The group was formed to promote research into any aspect of women's lives as experienced or depicted within this period. The depth, range and creativity of the essays in this book reflect the myriad interests of its members.