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20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000

See below for a selection of the latest books from 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000 category. Presented with a red border are the 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Endgame

Endgame

Author: Jennifer Siegel, Paul Kennedy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 17/09/2020

By the start of the twenteith century both Britain and Russia, suspicious of Imperial Germany, decided to stabilize relations and replace their rivalry in Central Asia - the 'Great Game' - with rapprochement. Jennifer Siegel demonstrates that reality in the field told a different story: the momentum of imperial rivalry, spiced by oil and railway development, could not be arrested and various interests on both sides continued to stoke the fire with increasing aggressiveness. By 1914, Britain and Russia were on the brink of war once again, to be saved only by the outbreak of the First World War. This book is a ground-breaking and original study, based on hitherto unseen archival sources in Moscow and St Petersburg and original research in London.

Historicizing Roma in Central Europe

Historicizing Roma in Central Europe

Author: Victoria Shmidt, Bernadette Nadya Jaworsky Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/09/2020

In Central Europe, limited success in revisiting the role of science in the segregation of Roma reverberates with the yet-unmet call for contextualizing the impact of ideas on everyday racism. This book attempts to interpret such a gap as a case of epistemic injustice. It underscores the historical role of ideas in race-making and provides analytical lenses for exploring cross-border transfers of whiteness in Central Europe. In the case of Roma, the scientific argument in favor of segregation continues to play an outstanding role due to a long-term focus on the limited educability of Roma. The authors trace the long-term interrelation between racializing Roma and the adaptation by Central European scholars of theories legitimizing segregation against those considered non-white, conceived as unable to become educated or civilized. Along with legitimizing segregation, sterilization and even extermination, theorizing ineducability has laid the groundwork for negating the capacity of Roma as subjects of knowledge. Such negation has hindered practices of identity and quite literally prevented Roma in Central Europe from becoming who they are. This systematic epistemic injustice still echoes in contemporary attempts to historicize Roma in Central Europe. The authors critically investigate contemporary approaches to historicize Roma as reproducing whiteness and inevitably leading to various forms of epistemic injustice. The methodological approach herein conceptualizes critical whiteness as a practice of epistemic justice targeted at providing a sustainable platform for reflecting upon the impact of the past on the contemporary situation of Roma.

Mussolini and the Eclipse of Italian Fascism

Mussolini and the Eclipse of Italian Fascism

Author: R. J. B. Bosworth Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/09/2020

On the tenth anniversary of his rise to power in 1932, Mussolini seemed to many the good dictator. He was the first totalitarian and the first fascist in modern Europe. But a year later Hitler's entrance onto the political stage signaled a German takeover of the fascist ideology. In this definitive account, eminent historian R.J.B. Bosworth charts Mussolini's leadership in reaction to Hitler. Bosworth shows how Italy's decline in ideological pre-eminence, as well as in military and diplomatic power, led Mussolini to pursue a more populist approach: angry and bellicose words at home, violent aggression abroad, and a more extreme emphasis on charisma. In his embittered efforts to bolster an increasingly hollow and ruthless regime, it was Mussolini, rather than Hitler, who offered the model for all subsequent authoritarians.

The Lost World of Socialists at Europe's Margins

The Lost World of Socialists at Europe's Margins

Author: Maria (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA) Todorova Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/09/2020

Maria Todorova's book is devoted to the 'golden age' of the socialist idea, broadly surveying the period in and around the time of the Second International. It critically examines the promise for an alternative socialist utopia from 1870 to the 1920s. Todorova brings in the experience of the periphery in a comparative context in the belief that the margins can often elucidate better the character of a phenomenon, and de-provincialize it from essentialist notions. In doing so, The Lost World of Socialists at Europe's Margins moves beyond the traditional historiographical emphasis on ideology by looking at different intersections or entanglements of spaces, generations, genders, ideas and feelings, and different flows of historical time. The study provides a social and cultural history of early socialism in Eastern Europe with an emphasis on Bulgaria, arguably the country with the earliest and strongest socialist movement in Southeast Europe, and one that had a unique relationship to both German and Russian social democracy. Based on a rich prosopographical database of around 3500 biographies of people born in the 19th century, the book addresses the interplay of several generations of leftists, looking at the specifics of how ideas were generated, received, transferred and transformed. Finally, the work investigates the intersection between subjectivity and memory as reflected in a unique cache of archival materials containing over 4000 documentary sources including diaries, oral interviews, and unpublished memoirs. A microhistorical approach to this material allows the reconstruction of 'structures of feeling' that inspired an exceptional group of individuals.

Backstop Land

Backstop Land

Author: Glenn Patterson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/09/2020

'Funny, wise, entertaining and illuminating, this book is one of the best things to come out of the Brexit saga' FINTAN O'TOOLE. 'Read this absorbing book to understand why, since 2016, we have been playing with fire. There is no longer any excuse for ignorance' MISHA GLENNY. Northern Ireland's frontier with the South has been an invisible line since the peace agreement of 1998. Now the battle over the UK's decision to leave the EU risks turning it into a hard border. Yet few people in the rest of Britain (or Ireland) know anything much about this most volatile part of an increasingly disunited Kingdom. This book was written in the feverish summer of 2019, in the aftermath of the 'New' IRA's murder of Lyra McKee, with the fear and anxiety of Brexit looming over a region in which paramilitary forces are still carrying out beatings, and worse, even as the numbers of tourists drawn by the Titanic and Game of Thrones continue to grow. The power-sharing government created by the Good Friday Agreement has not met - a bleak record in a long-running farce - in over 1,000 days. If it wasn't for the wonderful weather you might wonder why anyone stayed there at all. Glenn Patterson brings a lifetime's engagement with Northern Ireland and a brilliant novelist's eye to an informative, darkly entertaining portrait of a fragile country. Welcome to Backstop Land.

The Price of Loyalty

The Price of Loyalty

Author: Andrew L. Johns Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2020

This book explores how and why Vietnam loomed so large for Humphrey as vice president from 1964 through the 1968 election campaign against Richard Nixon. It assesses how Humphrey's loyalty to Lyndon Johnson, who emerges as the villain of the story in many ways, would negatively affect his political ambitions. And it engages the disconnect between Humphrey's principles and the intricate politics of his convoluted relationship with the president and his unsuccessful presidential campaign. It is a complex and frustrating narrative, the results of which would be tragic, not only for Humphrey's presidential aspirations, but also for the war in Southeast Asia and the future of the United States.

Killing Strangers

Killing Strangers

A bewildering feature of so much contemporary political violence is its stunning impersonality. Every major city centre becomes a potential shooting gallery; and every metro system a potential bomb alley. Victims just happen, as the saying goes, to 'be in the wrong place at the wrong time'. We accept this contemporary reality - at least to some degree. But we rarely ask: where has it come from historically? Killing Strangers tackles this question head on. It examines how such violence became 'unchained' from inter-personal relationships. It traces the rise of such impersonal violence by examining violence in conjunction with changing social and political realities. In particular, it traces both 'push' and 'pull' - the ability of modern states to force the violence of their challengers into niche forms: and the disturbing new opportunities that technological changes offer to cause mayhem in fresh and original ways. Killing Strangers therefore aims to highlight the very strangeness of contemporary experience when it is viewed against a long-term perspective. Atrocities regularly capture media attention - and just as quickly fade from public view. That is both tragic - and utterly predictable. Deep down we expect no different. And that is why such atrocities must be repeated if our attention is to be re-engaged. Deep down we expect that, too. So Killing Strangers deliberately asks the very simplest of questions. How on earth did we get here?

LVIV - Wroclaw, Cities in Parallel?

LVIV - Wroclaw, Cities in Parallel?

Author: Jan (Jan Fellerer Is Associate Professor at the University of Oxford) Fellerer Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2020

In the 20th century, both Lviv and Wroclaw went through cataclysmic changes. Assertively Polish pre-war Lwow became Soviet Lvov, and then, after 1991, it became assertively Ukrainian Lviv. Breslau, the third largest city in Germany before 1945, was in turn 'recovered' by communist Poland as Wroclaw. Practically the entire population of Breslau was replaced, and Lwow's demography too was dramatically restructured: many Polish inhabitants migrated to Wroclaw and most Jews perished or went into exile. Migration entailed new myths and the construction of official memory projects. The chapters in this edited book compare the two cities by focusing on lived experiences and 'bottom-up' historical processes. Their sources and methods are those of micro-history and include oral testimonies, memoirs, direct observation and questionnaires, examples of popular culture and media pieces. The essays explore many manifestations of the two sides of the same coin, loss on the one hand, gain on the other, in two cities that are complementary.

Russia's Greatest Enemy?

Russia's Greatest Enemy?

Author: Charlotte (Northumbria University, UK) Alston Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2020

A remarkably talented linguist, foreign correspondent in Russia from 1904 to 1921 and Foreign Editor for 'The Times', Russia's Greatest Enemy? traces the fascinating life and career of Harold Williams. This quiet and modest New Zealander played a central role in informing and influencing British opinion on Russia from the twilight of the Tsars, through War and Revolution, to the rise of the Soviet Union. The career of this keen Russophile and fierce opponent of Bolshevism illuminates the pre-First World War movement towards rapprochement with the Tsar, as well as the drive for intervention and isolation in the Soviet period. In this fascinating study, Charlotte Alston explores the role of Williams as Russia's interpreter to the British and the Britain's to Russia in this turbulent period in the history of both countries

The Marquess of Londonderry

The Marquess of Londonderry

Author: Dr. N.C. (University of Worcester, UK) Fleming Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2020

The decline and fall of the British aristocracy looked headlong and irreversible in the twentieth century yet many grandees tried to preserve their power, wealth and influence by every means - and with some success. There is no better example than the Seventh Marquess of Londonderry whose life from 1878 to 1949 spanned and mirrored the period. The Londonderrys had enjoyed immense wealth in land and minerals in Britain and Ireland for centuries, played leading roles in Parliament and the state, and in an earlier time the Seventh Marquess would have continued in the family tradition of patrician prominence. Drawing upon original state and family papers, N.C. Fleming places the Londonderrys in the context of the history and the political theory of aristocracy and shows the constant struggle - not without success - against marginalisation. The theme runs through Londonderry's career as Conservative MP, on the Irish Viceroy's Council, as a junior minister in Lloyd Geroge's coalition, at the Air Ministry with Trenchard - the 'father of the RAF' - and in the National Government. Perhaps an element of desperation entered in his private business ventures and with contacts with the far Right - all in sharp contrast to past family achievement.

Albania and King Zog

Albania and King Zog

Author: Owen Pearson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2020

Albania in Occupation and War

Albania in Occupation and War

Author: Owen Pearson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2020

Albania in the Twentieth Century: A History represents an unparalleled achievement in scholarship on Albania. Owen Pearson presents a complete account of twentieth-century Albania, from its breakaway from the Ottoman Empire in 1908 to the Kosova War in 1999. In fascinating detail, Pearson chronicles the monarchy of King Zog and the wartime period where Albania became a battleground for the Greek, Italian and German armies. He describes Enver Hoxha's seizure of power, the country's fraught relationship with the post-Stalin Soviet Union and Maoist China's fraternal embrace of Albania, all leading to near-total isolationism and inevitable economic collapse. Pearson concludes with the genocide of Kosovar Albanians at the hands of the Serbian regime of Milosevic that characterised the last decade of twentieth-century Albania. Comprising original research, and excerpts from rare Albanian sources, this is a compendium of primary source material that provides a year-by-year and sometimes day-by-day account of Albania's modern history. It is an essential reference for all those interested in Albanian, Balkan and Eastern European history.