LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000

See below for a selection of the latest books from 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000 category. Presented with a red border are the 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great 20th century history: c 1900 to c 2000 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Languages of Trauma

Languages of Trauma

Author: Peter Leese Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/05/2021

This volume traces the distinct cultural languages in which individual and collective forms of trauma are expressed in diverse variations, including oral or written narratives, literature, comic strips, photography, theatre, and cinematic images. The central argument is that traumatic memories are frequently beyond the sphere of medical, legal, or state intervention. To address these different, often intertwined modes of language, the contributors provide a variety of disciplinary approaches to foster innovative debates and provoke new insights. Prevailing definitions of trauma can best be understood according to the cultural and historical conditions within which they exist. Languages of Trauma explores what this means in practice by scrutinizing varied historical moments from the First World War onwards and particular cultural contexts from across Europe, the United States, Asia, and Africa - striving to help decolonize the traditional Western-centred history of trauma, dissolving it into multifaceted transnational histories of trauma cultures.

A Brief History of Britain 1851-2021

A Brief History of Britain 1851-2021

Author: Jeremy Black Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/05/2021

From the Great Exhibition's showcasing of British national achievement in 1851 to the opening ceremonies of the Olympics in Stratford in 2012 and on to Brexit, an insightful exploration of the transformation of modern Britain This revised and updated fourth and final volume in the concise Brief History of Britain series begins in the specially-constructed Crystal Palace, three times the length of St Paul's Cathedral, in Hyde Park at the beginning of the second half of the nineteenth century. The Great Exhibition it housed marked a high point of British national achievement, at the forefront of the Industrial Revolution, at the heart of a great empire, with Queen Victoria still to reign for fifty years. It was a time of confidence in the future, and exuberant patriotism for Britain's role in it. The beginning of the Second World War in 1939 marks a turning point because of the great change it heralded in Britain's global standing. At its peak, protected by the world's greatest navy, the British Empire stretched from Australasia to Canada, from Hong Kong and India to South Africa, and from Jamaica to the Falklands. Now the empire is no more: a fundamental change not only for the world, but also for Britain. The Second World War had been won, but it had exhausted Britain and marked the beginning of its national decline. Black links cultural and political developments closely - transport, health, migration and economic and demographic factors - in order to make clear how porous and changeable the manifestations of national civilisation can be, and to make sense of themes such as the triumph of town over country, Britain's international clout and the shift from the dominance of the market at the turn of the nineteenth century to the growing significance of the state. Importantly, he also looks at how public history has presented the nation's past, and how the changing and different ways we look at that past are central aspects of our shared history.

Suppressed

Suppressed

Author: Robert M. Smith Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/05/2021

The Magneti Marelli Workers Committee

The Magneti Marelli Workers Committee

Author: Emilio Mentasti Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/05/2021

Letters to Camondo

Letters to Camondo

Author: Edmund de Waal Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/04/2021

63 rue de Monceau, Paris Dear friend, As you may have guessed by now, I am not in your house by accident. I know your street rather well. Count Moise de Camondo lived a few doors away from Edmund de Waal's forebears, the Ephrussi, first encountered in his bestselling memoir The Hare with Amber Eyes. Like the Ephrussi, the Camondos were part of belle epoque high society. They were also targets of anti-semitism. Camondo created a spectacular house and filled it with the greatest private collection of French eighteenth-century art for his son to inherit. But when Nissim was killed in the First World War, it became a memorial and, on the Count's death, was bequeathed to France. The Musee Nissim de Camondo has remained unchanged since 1936. Edmund de Waal explores the lavish rooms and detailed archives and uncovers new layers to the family story. In a haunting series of letters addressed to the Count, he tells us what happened next.

Dark Quadrant

Dark Quadrant

Author: Jonathan Marshall Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/04/2021

Victoire

Victoire

Author: Roland Philipps Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/04/2021

VICTOIRE is about Mathilde Carre - codenamed 'La Chatte', the cat, then known as Agent Victoire - who was the exceptionally charismatic and daring founder of the 'Big Network'. This was the first Allied intelligence network in Occupied France, which soon grew central to Resistance efforts and to be a lifeline of crucial information to an isolated Britain. But her allegiances become more complex when the network is rolled up by the Germans and she makes a fateful compromise. She first becomes a double agent before later trying to persuade the British to back her as a triple agent. Mathilde's story and that of the network she helped build has never been fully told before. This book will draw on a wide range of sources including recently declassified material to do that. (Elusive to the last, she was thought to have died in 1970 but may in fact have lived as a recluse until 2007 and the age of 98.) VICTOIRE shares the themes of compromise and duplicity which Roland explored with such success in A SPY NAMED ORPHAN. As he writes, 'Mathilde Carre's life is a three-act tragedy: the woman who does right, the woman who does wrong, the woman who tries to redeem herself but can never be fully trusted.'

Refugees in Twentieth-Century Britain

Refugees in Twentieth-Century Britain

Author: Becky (University of East Anglia) Taylor Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/03/2021

This timely history explores the entry, reception and resettlement of refugees across twentieth-century Britain. Focusing on four cohorts of refugees - Jewish and other refugees from Nazism; Hungarians in 1956; Ugandan Asians expelled by Idi Amin; and Vietnamese 'boat people' who arrived in the wake of the fall of Saigon - Becky Taylor deftly integrates refugee history with key themes in the history of modern Britain. She thus demonstrates how refugees' experiences, rather than being marginal, were emblematic of some of the principal developments in British society. Arguing that Britain's reception of refugees was rarely motivated by humanitarianism, this book reveals the role of Britain's international preoccupations, anxieties and sense of identity; and how refugees' reception was shaped by voluntary efforts and the changing nature of the welfare state. Based on rich archival sources, this study offers a compelling new perspective on changing ideas of Britishness and the place of 'outsiders' in modern Britain.

Refugees in Twentieth-Century Britain

Refugees in Twentieth-Century Britain

Author: Becky (University of East Anglia) Taylor Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/03/2021

This timely history explores the entry, reception and resettlement of refugees across twentieth-century Britain. Focusing on four cohorts of refugees - Jewish and other refugees from Nazism; Hungarians in 1956; Ugandan Asians expelled by Idi Amin; and Vietnamese 'boat people' who arrived in the wake of the fall of Saigon - Becky Taylor deftly integrates refugee history with key themes in the history of modern Britain. She thus demonstrates how refugees' experiences, rather than being marginal, were emblematic of some of the principal developments in British society. Arguing that Britain's reception of refugees was rarely motivated by humanitarianism, this book reveals the role of Britain's international preoccupations, anxieties and sense of identity; and how refugees' reception was shaped by voluntary efforts and the changing nature of the welfare state. Based on rich archival sources, this study offers a compelling new perspective on changing ideas of Britishness and the place of 'outsiders' in modern Britain.

Snatch Racket

Snatch Racket

Author: Carolyn Cox Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/03/2021

The Snatch Racket uncovers the massive wave of kidnapping that shook the nation's communities. An estimated three thousand Americans were kidnapped for ransom in the year 1931. They were early victims of a kidnapping wave that grew to be an epidemic in the twilight days of Prohibition as urban gangs looked for new revenue streams to replace the once lucrative business of bootlegging. Wealthy families and celebrities began purchasing kidnap insurance, hiring armed chauffeurs and bodyguards, and carrying loaded handguns. Some sent their children to school or summer camp in Europe to get them out of harm's way. Guards kept kidnap watch over both President Hoover and President Roosevelt's grandchildren. The Kidnapped, as the racketeers referred to it, reached its peak in 1933 and 1934: Recent Kidnappings in America was a regular feature in the New York Times, and Time magazine included kidnappings along with its weekly list of notable births, deaths, and other milestones. The Snatch Racket is the frightening story of this crime epidemic and the three-year War against Kidnappers waged by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration to eradicate it. At the heart of the narrative are some of the most iconic names of the twentieth century: Rockefeller, Ford, Lindbergh, Roosevelt, Hoover, Capone, Schwarzkopf, and Babe Ruth. All were caught up in some way in the kidnap frenzy - as victims and intended victims, as law enforcement officials and political leaders, or as individuals attempting to alleviate suffering or to benefit personally somehow from the scourge that took such a toll on the country. The War against Kidnappers also revolutionized and modernized law enforcement in the United States, dramatically expanding the powers of the federal government in the fight against not only kidnapping but many new types of interstate crime. It would make J. Edgar Hoover the face of law enforcement in America, a role he would play for another three decades. Not least, the crime of kidnapping would be recognized as a devastating form of domestic terrorism against which the public would come to expect special protection from government, making the War against Kidnappers the first of the declared wars on terrorism that continue today.

Victoire

Victoire

Author: Roland Philipps Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/03/2021

RESISTANCE, COLLABORATION AND BETRAYAL Occupied Paris, 1940. A woman in a red hat and a black fur coat hurries down a side-street. She is Mathilde Carre, codenamed 'the Cat', later known as Agent Victoire. She is charismatic, daring, and a spy; her story is one of heroism and survival against the odds. These are the darkest days for France, half-occupied by Nazi Germany, half-governed by the collaborationist Vichy regime; and dark days for Britain, isolated and under threat of invasion. Yet Mathilde is driven by a sense of destiny that she will be her nation's saviour. With little training or support, Mathilde and her Polish collaborator, Roman Czerniawski, create a huge web of agents in a matter of weeks to form the first great Allied intelligence network of the Second World War. They risk torture and execution to deliver their coded reports, London's sole source of reliable information about the Occupation. But the 'Big Network' is threatened at every turn and when the Germans inevitably close in Mathilde makes a desperate compromise. She enters a hall of mirrors in which any bond is doubtful and every action could be fatal. Nobody is certain where her allegiances lie - her German handler, the founder of the Resistance she ensnares and the British who eventually succeed in extracting her on a fast boat all have to make their own calculations. Is she a double, possibly even a triple agent, and, if so, can she be trusted to turn yet again? Victoire is the story of a passionate, courageous spy but also of a fragile hero, desperate to belong - a portrait of patriotism and survival in momentous times. Drawing on a wide range of new and first-hand material, Roland Philipps has written a dazzling tale of audacity, complicity and the choices made in wartime.

Mussolini and the Eclipse of Italian Fascism

Mussolini and the Eclipse of Italian Fascism

Author: R. J. B. Bosworth Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/03/2021

An incisive account of how Mussolini pioneered populism in reaction to Hitler's rise-and thereby reinforced his role as a model for later authoritarian leaders On the tenth anniversary of his rise to power in 1932, Benito Mussolini (1883-1945) seemed to many the good dictator. He was the first totalitarian and the first fascist in modern Europe. But a year later Hitler's entrance onto the political stage signaled a German takeover of the fascist ideology. In this definitive account, eminent historian R.J.B. Bosworth charts Mussolini's leadership in reaction to Hitler. Bosworth shows how Italy's decline in ideological pre-eminence, as well as in military and diplomatic power, led Mussolini to pursue a more populist approach: angry and bellicose words at home, violent aggression abroad, and a more extreme emphasis on charisma. In his embittered efforts to bolster an increasingly hollow and ruthless regime, it was Mussolini, rather than Hitler, who offered the model for all subsequent authoritarians.