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Modern history to 20th century: c 1700 to c 1900

See below for a selection of the latest books from Modern history to 20th century: c 1700 to c 1900 category. Presented with a red border are the Modern history to 20th century: c 1700 to c 1900 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Modern history to 20th century: c 1700 to c 1900 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Johann Reinhold Forster and the Making of Natural History on Cook's Second Voyage, 1772-1775

Johann Reinhold Forster and the Making of Natural History on Cook's Second Voyage, 1772-1775

Author: Anne Mariss Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/11/2019

James Cook's voyages of exploration are a turning point not only in the history of the British Empire, but also in the history of science and exploration of the Pacific. The last decades have seen a wide-ranging scholarly interest in Cook's voyages, focusing on their impact on European and Polynesian societies, their scientific results, and their protagonists, such as Cook himself or the nobleman Joseph Banks who took part in Cook's first voyage of exploration. This book examines the hitherto underestimated role of the German scholar Johann Reinhold Forster who, together with his son Georg Forster, accompanied Cook on his second voyage of exploration (1772-1775) as a principal naturalist. For a long time, the German traveler has remained a rather shadowy figure of Cook's voyages of exploration and has only attracted scholarly attention occasionally. Focusing on the making of knowledge onboard the ship and the islands where it made landfall, the study provides a historical reappraisal of Forster's scientific performance as a leading naturalist of his time. By examining Forster's Resolution Journal, Anne Mariss takes a microhistorical approach toward the making of natural history knowledge during the expedition to the Pacific. Mariss unveils the difficulties the traveling naturalists encountered while collecting, describing, classifying, and painting the natural world. Her study brings to light the contribution of the various actors who were involved in this undertaking, such as the scientific assistants, sailors, officers, and the local actors of the Pacific world.

Caesarism in the Post-Revolutionary Age Crisis, Populace and Leadership

Caesarism in the Post-Revolutionary Age Crisis, Populace and Leadership

Author: Markus J. (European Parliament, Belgium) Prutsch Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2019

Debates about the legitimacy and `essence' of political rule and the search for `ideal' forms of government have been at the very heart of political thought ever since antiquity. Caesarism in the Post-Revolutionary Age explores the complex relationship between democracy and dictatorship from the 18th century onwards. More concretely, it assesses how democracy emerged as something compatible with dictatorship, both at the level of political thought and practice. Taking Caesarism - a political alternative somewhere between democracy and dictatorship - as its key concept, the book considers: * To what extent was Caesarism seen as a new post-revolutionary form of rule? * What were the flaws and perils, strengths and promises of Caesaristic regimes? * Can 19th-century Caesarism be characterised as a `prelude' to 20th-century totalitarianism? * What is the legacy and ongoing appeal of Caesarism in the contemporary world? This study will be of value to anyone interested in modern political history, but also contemporary politics.

From Cells to Organisms A History of Cell Theory

From Cells to Organisms A History of Cell Theory

Author: Sherrie L Lyons Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/10/2019

This book uses the history of cell theory to explore the emergence of biology as a distinct field in its own right-separate from anatomy, physiology, and natural history. It also explores nineteenth- and twentieth-century ideas about heredity and development and the progress that was made at the turn of the century when they began to be studied on their own-leading to new understandings of a variety of biological problems, from evolution to cancer. Investigating this story will help readers gain an appreciation of the historical development of scientific ideas. It beautifully illustrates that the process of science is not as straightforward as it is usually portrayed. One of the important lessons of this intriguing story is that facts do not necessarily speak for themselves, and observations always need to be interpreted.

From Cells to Organisms A History of Cell Theory

From Cells to Organisms A History of Cell Theory

Author: Sherrie L Lyons Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2019

This book uses the history of cell theory to explore the emergence of biology as a distinct field in its own right-separate from anatomy, physiology, and natural history. It also explores nineteenth- and twentieth-century ideas about heredity and development and the progress that was made at the turn of the century when they began to be studied on their own-leading to new understandings of a variety of biological problems, from evolution to cancer. Investigating this story will help readers gain an appreciation of the historical development of scientific ideas. It beautifully illustrates that the process of science is not as straightforward as it is usually portrayed. One of the important lessons of this intriguing story is that facts do not necessarily speak for themselves, and observations always need to be interpreted.

America's Political Inventors The Lost Art of Legislation

America's Political Inventors The Lost Art of Legislation

Author: George W (Independent Scholar, USA) Liebmann Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/10/2019

Recent American political developments, including the election of Donald Trump, reveal profound disquiet with the highly centralized political regime based on discretionary allocation of funds and powers to interest groups that has developed since the creation of emergency institutions after America's entry into World War I. This book demonstrates the effectiveness in American history of measures conceived in a different spirit, addressing the population at large, rather than particular interest groups, relying on citizen and local initiative, and founded not on the distribution of frequently unearned benefits and powers but on reciprocal contributions and obligations. George W. Liebmann discusses John Winthrop and his foundation of New England towns; John Locke and the creation of Southern plantations; Thomas Jefferson and his scheme for the organization of Northwestern townships and American territories and states; Joseph Pulitzer and the origins of municipal home rule; John Wesley Powell and the creation of reclamation districts; Hugh Hammond Bennett and the fostering of soil conservation districts; and Byron Hanke and the development of residential community associations. The book concludes with a number of public policy proposals relating to housing, urban renewal, care of the elderly, immigration and youth unemployment conceived in the same spirit. Liebmann brings to light little-known facts concerning the growth of practices and institutions that Americans take for granted. His book will be of interest to students of biography, history and government.

Networks of Influence and Power Business, Culture and Identity in Liverpool's Merchant Community, c.1800-1914

Networks of Influence and Power Business, Culture and Identity in Liverpool's Merchant Community, c.1800-1914

Author: Robert (University of Liverpool, UK) Lee Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/10/2019

During the nineteenth century Liverpool became the heart of an international maritime network. As the 'second city' of Empire, its merchants and shipowners operated within a transnational commercial and financial system, while its trading connections stimulated the development of new markets and their intregration within an increasingly global economy. This groundbreaking volume brings together ten original contributions that reflect upon the development of the city's business community from the early-nineteenth century to the outbreak of the First World War with an emphasis on the period from 1851 to 1912. It offers the first detailed analysis of Liverpool's merchant community within a conceptual and historiographical framework which focuses on the economic, social and cultural role of business elites in the nineteenth century. It explores the extent to which business success was predicated on the maintenance of networks of trust; analyses the importance of business culture in structuring commercial operations; and discusses the role of ethics, trust and reputation within the changing framework of the business environment. Particular attention is paid to the role of women and the important contribution of the family to commercial success and the maintenance of social networks. Changes in business practice and social networks are also examined within a spatial context in order to assess the impact of the development of a distinct commercial centre and the clustering of commercial activity on interaction, reputation and trust, while particular attention is paid to the effect of suburbanization on existing associational networks, the social cohesiveness of business culture, and the cultural identity of the merchant community as a whole.

Bridging East and West Ol'ha Kobylians'ka, Ukraine's Pioneering Modernist

Bridging East and West Ol'ha Kobylians'ka, Ukraine's Pioneering Modernist

Author: Yuliya Ladygina Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/10/2019

Bridging East and West explores the literary evolution of one of Ukraine's foremost modernist writers, Ol'ha Kobylianska, who was a major contributor in the intellectual debates of her time. Investigating themes of feminism, populism, Nietzscheanism, nationalism, and fascism in her works, this study presents an alternative intellectual genealogy in turn-of-the-century European arts and letters whose implications reach far beyond the field of Ukrainian studies. Rather than repeating various narratives about modernism as a radical response to nineteenth-century bourgeois culture or an aesthetic of fragmentation, this study highlights the fissures and fusions inherent to turn-of-the-century thought. For feminist scholars, Bridging East and West makes accessible a thorough account of a central, yet overlooked, woman writer who served as a model and a contributor within a major cultural tradition. For those working in Victorian studies or comparative fascism and for those interested in Nietzsche and his influence on European intellectuals, Kobylians'ka emerges in this study as an unlikely, but no less active, trailblazer in the social and aesthetic theories that would define European debates about culture, science, and politics in the first half of the twentieth century. For those interested in questions of transnationalism and intersectionality, this study's discussion of Kobylians'ka's hybrid cultural identity and philosophical program exemplifies cultural interchange and irreducible complexities of cultural identity.

Converting Britannia Evangelicals and British Public Life, 1770-1840

Converting Britannia Evangelicals and British Public Life, 1770-1840

Author: Gareth Atkins Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/10/2019

The moralism that characterized the decades either side of 1800 - the so-called 'Age of William Wilberforce' - has long been regarded as having a massive impact on British culture. Yet the reasons why Wilberforce and his Evangelical contemporaries were so influential politically and in the wider public sphere have never been properly understood. Converting Britannia shows for the first time how and why religious reformism carried such weight. Evangelicalism, it argues, was not just an innovative social phenomenon, but also a political machine that exploited establishment strengths to replicate itself at home and internationally. The book maps networks that spanned the churches, universities, business, armed forces and officialdom, connecting London and the regions with Europe and the world, from business milieux in the City of London and elsewhere through the Royal Navy, the Colonial Office and East India and Sierra Leone companies. Revealing how religion drove debates about British history and identity in the first half of the nineteenth century, it throws new light not just on the networks themselves, but on cheap print, mass-production and the public sphere: the interconnecting technologies that sustained religion in a rapidly modernizing age and projected it into new contexts abroad. GARETH ATKINS is a Bye-Fellow at Queens' College, University of Cambridge.

A Short History of the French Revolution

A Short History of the French Revolution

Author: Jeremy D. (University of Kentucky, USA) Popkin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/10/2019

A Short History of the French Revolution is an up-to-date survey of the French Revolution and Napoleonic era that introduces readers to the origins and events of this turbulent period in French history, and historians' interpretations of these events. The book covers all aspects of the Revolution, including the political, social and cultural origins of the Revolution, and its causes, events and aftermath, to provide readers with a full, and yet concise, overview of the Revolution that helps them easily understand the key elements of the subject. Fully updated and revised, this new edition allows students to engage with the most current work on the subject with increased attention given to women's role in the Revolution, full coverage of the struggles over race and slavery, a new emphasis on the populist element in revolutionary politics and an expanded discussion of the historiography of the era. Supported by learning objectives, critical thinking questions and suggestions for further reading, this is the perfect introduction to the French Revolution for students of French and European History in the late eighteenth century.

A Short History of the French Revolution

A Short History of the French Revolution

Author: Jeremy D. (University of Kentucky, USA) Popkin Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/10/2019

A Short History of the French Revolution is an up-to-date survey of the French Revolution and Napoleonic era that introduces readers to the origins and events of this turbulent period in French history, and historians' interpretations of these events. The book covers all aspects of the Revolution, including the political, social and cultural origins of the Revolution, and its causes, events and aftermath, to provide readers with a full, and yet concise, overview of the Revolution that helps them easily understand the key elements of the subject. Fully updated and revised, this new edition allows students to engage with the most current work on the subject with increased attention given to women's role in the Revolution, full coverage of the struggles over race and slavery, a new emphasis on the populist element in revolutionary politics and an expanded discussion of the historiography of the era. Supported by learning objectives, critical thinking questions and suggestions for further reading, this is the perfect introduction to the French Revolution for students of French and European History in the late eighteenth century.

The Triumph of the Moon A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft

The Triumph of the Moon A History of Modern Pagan Witchcraft

Author: Ronald (Professor of History, Bristol University) Hutton Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/10/2019

This is the second, and extensively revised, edition of the first full-scale scholarly study of what is arguably the only fully-formed religion that England has ever given the world: that of modern pagan witchcraft, which has now spread from English shores across four continents. Ronald Hutton examines the nature of that religion and its development, and offers a history of attitudes to witchcraft, paganism and magic in British society since 1800. Its pages reveal village cunning folk, Victorian ritual magicians, classicists and archaeologists, leaders of woodcraft and scouting movements, Freemasons, and members of rural secret societies. We also find some of the leading figures of English literature, from the Romantic poets to W. B. Yeats, D. H. Lawrence and Robert Graves, as well as the main personalities who have represented pagan witchcraft to the public world since 1950. Thriller writers like Dennis Wheatley, and films and television programmes, get similar coverage, as does tabloid journalism. The material is by its very nature often sensational, and care is taken throughout to distinguish fact from fantasy, in a manner not hitherto applied to most of the stories involved. Consistently densely researched, Triumph of the Moon presents an authoritative insight into an aspect of modern cultural history which has attracted sensational publicity but has hitherto been little understood. This edition incorporates all of the new research carried out into the subject by the author, and by others who have often been inspired by this book, during the twenty years since it was first published.

Meat Planet Artificial Flesh and the Future of Food

Meat Planet Artificial Flesh and the Future of Food

Author: Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/10/2019

In 2013, a Dutch scientist unveiled the world's first laboratory-created hamburger. Since then, the idea of producing meat, not from live animals but from carefully cultured tissues, has spread like wildfire through the media. Meanwhile, cultured meat researchers race against population growth and climate change in an effort to make sustainable protein. Meat Planet explores the quest to generate meat in the lab-a substance sometimes called cultured meat -and asks what it means to imagine that this is the future of food. Neither an advocate nor a critic of cultured meat, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft spent five years researching the phenomenon. In Meat Planet, he reveals how debates about lab-grown meat reach beyond debates about food, examining the links between appetite, growth, and capitalism. Could satiating the growing appetite for meat actually lead to our undoing? Are we simply using one technology to undo the damage caused by another? Like all problems in our food system, the meat problem is not merely a problem of production. It is intrinsically social and political, and it demands that we examine questions of justice and desirable modes of living in a shared and finite world. Benjamin Wurgaft tells a story that could utterly transform the way we think of animals, the way we relate to farmland, the way we use water, and the way we think about population and our fragile ecosystem's capacity to sustain life. He argues that even if cultured meat does not succeed, it functions-much like science fiction-as a crucial mirror that we can hold up to our contemporary fleshy dysfunctions.