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Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700

See below for a selection of the latest books from Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700 category. Presented with a red border are the Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

James Harrington An Intellectual Biography

James Harrington An Intellectual Biography

Despite not being an active participant in the English Civil War, seventeenth-century political thinker James Harrington exercised an important influence on the ideas and politics of that crucial period of history. In The Commonwealth of Oceana he sought to explain why civil war had broken out in 1642, to put the case for commonwealth government, and to offer a detailed constitutional blueprint for a new and successful English government. In this intellectual biography of Harrington, Rachel Hammersley sets a fresh analysis of this and Harrington's other writings against the background of his life and the turbulent period in which he lived. In doing so, this study seeks to move beyond the conventional view of Harrington as primarily a republican thinker, offering a broader and more comprehensive account of him which addresses the complexity of his republicanism as well as exploring his contributions to economic, historical, religious, philosophical, and scientific debates; his experimentation with vocabulary and literary form; and the relationship between his life and thought. Harrington is presented as an innovative political thinker, committed to democracy, social mobility, and meritocracy. Ultimately, this broader examination of Harrington's life and work opens a window on political, economic, religious, and scientific issues which serve to complicate understandings of the English Revolution, and sheds fresh light on the relevance of seventeenth-century ideas to the modern world.

The Life and Times of Thomas Stukeley (c.1525-78)

The Life and Times of Thomas Stukeley (c.1525-78)

Author: Juan E. Tazon Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2019

This book was published in 2003. Thomas Stukeley was one of the most colourful characters of the Elizabethan age, whose exploits brought him fame and notoriety throughout Europe. Described variously as picturesque, quixotic, cloudy minded, remarkable, and (by Evelyn Waugh) as a preposterous and richly comic figure , Stukeley remains a flamboyant and fascinating character in the imagination of succeeding generations. Yet whilst these portrayals may be accurate, they do not in themselves do full justice to a multifaceted man whose remarkable career included stints as mercenary, pirate, forger, colonial adventurer, political advisor, diplomat and traitor, and who rubbed shoulders with princes, kings and popes. In this new biography, Professor Tazon makes extensive use of previously neglected documents from British, Spanish and Italian archives to produce a much more rounded and complete portrait of Stukeley and the events in which he participated. He brings Stukeley forth as a real figure, urging the reader to view in parallel English, Spanish, Irish and wider European history.

`Britain Turned Germany': the Thirty Years' War and its Impact on the British Isles 1638-1660 Proceedings of the 2018 Helion and Company 'Century of the Soldier' Conference

`Britain Turned Germany': the Thirty Years' War and its Impact on the British Isles 1638-1660 Proceedings of the 2018 Helion and Company 'Century of the Soldier' Conference

Author: Serena Jones Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/09/2019

The speakers at the 2018 Helion conference offer a variety of insights into the depth and direction of research into the Thirty Years' War, with particular reference to the war's effect on the British Isles, the careers of the officers from its shores who participated in the conflict, and the `trickle-down' effect of the war into the military thinking and technology of those isles. Keynote speaker Professor Steve Murdoch examines the changes in understanding of British military participation in the Thirty Years' War from a once unsophisticated and dismissive approach to a more enriched and interesting field of study. Keith Dowen examines the work of Catholic Irish colonel Gerat Barry, which has been largely overlooked. Michal Paradowski looks into the careers of three officers from the British Isles who fought abroad - Arthur Aston Jr, James Butler and Scotsman James Murray. Arran Johnston considers the importance of General Alexander Leslie and his officer corps, and the importance of their overseas service in the Thirty Years' War as the basis for the effectiveness of the Scottish army in the Bishops' Wars. Prof. Martyn Bennett explores the process of appointment of the rival command structures in 1642, at the start of the English Civil Wars. David Flintham considers the foreign, especially Dutch, influence on English fortification during the period, the methods employed and those who practised them. Stephen Ede-Borrett examines contemporary vexillology, and how much the Thirty Years' War influenced the military flags used by the English Armies from 1639 to 1651.

'Essential Agony' The Battle of Dunbar 1650

'Essential Agony' The Battle of Dunbar 1650

Author: Arran Johnston Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/09/2019

On 3 September 1650, two former allies fought a bitter clash of arms in the rain-soaked fields around the quiet seaside town of Dunbar. For one, it was a signal mercy which cemented his reputation and paved the way for political as well as military supremacy. For the other, it meant defeat, occupation, and the end of a cause. In England, Dunbar is remembered as one of Cromwell's most brilliant victories. In Scotland, as an avoidable tragedy caused by the placement of blind faith over sound judgement. And for those whose ancestors suffered in its terrible aftermath, it is a story of both sorrow and survival. This new analysis of the Battle of Dunbar explores the battlefield and its events in close detail, using the author's intimate knowledge of the landscape. From the high politics to the individual experience, Arran Johnston brings the story of the Dunbar campaign vividly to life and sets its significance within the context of both the seventeenth century and our own times.

'Ready to Bleed' The Armies of the Scottish Covenant 1639-47

'Ready to Bleed' The Armies of the Scottish Covenant 1639-47

Author: Arran Johnston Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/09/2019

This book charts the fortunes of the armies raised by the Scottish Covenanters as they fight across Scotland, Ireland and England in defence of their cause and in defiance of their king. From the Bishops Wars to the surrender of Charles I, Ready to Bleed explains the motivations, leadership, and appearance of the Scottish forces as they campaigned across three theatres. As well as narrating their progress through battle, siege, and skirmish, the author explores the elements which made the Scots armies so effective at its peak, and the changing factors which affected its ability to sustain its early successes. Presenting the civil wars from a Scottish perspective and setting that country's military endeavours into the contexts of both the domestic and wider political situation, this is a highly accessible volume combining both detail and pace.

Ceremony, Ritual and Kingcraft at the Court of Charles I

Ceremony, Ritual and Kingcraft at the Court of Charles I

Author: Nile K. (Phillips Academy, USA) Blunt Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/09/2019

This is a unique study of the relationship between religious ritual and ceremonial dining. Blunt's work is based on primary sources documenting the daily running of the king's household and will be of interest to scholars researching the court of Charles I and its material culture as well as the religious and political history of his reign.

The Culture of Castles in Tudor England and Wales

The Culture of Castles in Tudor England and Wales

Author: Audrey M. Thorstad Format: Hardback Release Date: 20/09/2019

The castle was an imposing architectural landmark in late medieval and early modern England and Wales. Castles were much more than lordly residences: they were accommodation to guests and servants, spaces of interaction between the powerful and the powerless, and part of larger networks of tenants, parks, and other properties. These structures were political, symbolic, residential, and military, and shaped the ways in which people consumed the landscape and interacted with the local communities around them. This volume offers the first interdisciplinary study of the socio-cultural understanding of the castle in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, a period during which the castle has largely been seen as in decline. Bringing together a wide range of source material - from architectural remains and archaeological finds to household records and political papers - it investigates the personnel of the castle; the use of space for politics and hospitality; the landscape; ideas of privacy; and the creation of a visual legacy. By focusing on such an iconic structure, the book allows us to see some of the ways in which men and women were negotiating the space around them on a daily basis; and just as importantly, it reveals the impact that the local communities had on the spaces of the castle. AUDREY M. THORSTAD is a Lecturer in Early Modern History in the School of History, Philosophy, and Social Sciences at Bangor University.

Francesco Robortello (1516-1567) Architectural Genius of the Humanities

Francesco Robortello (1516-1567) Architectural Genius of the Humanities

Author: Marco (Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy) Sgarbi Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/09/2019

This book explores the intellectual world of Francesco Robortello, one of the most prominent scholars of the Italian Renaissance. From poetics to rhetoric, philology to history, topics to ethics, Robortello revolutionized the field of humanities through innovative interpretations of ancient texts and with a genius that was architectural in scope. He was highly esteemed by his contemporaries for his acute wit, but also envied and disparaged for his many qualities. In comparison with other humanists of his time such as Carlo Sigonio and Pier Vettori, Robortello had a deeply philosophical vein, one that made him unique not only to Italy, but to Europe more generally. Robortello's role in reforming the humanities makes him a constituent part of the long-fifteenth century. Robortello's thought, however, unlike that of other fifteenth century humanists, sprung from and was thoroughly imbued with a systematic, Aristotelian spirit without which his philosophy would never have emerged from the tumultuous years of the mid-Cinquecento. Francesco Robortello created a system for the humanities which was unique for his century: a perfect union of humanism and philosophy. This book represents the first fully-fledged monograph on this adventurous intellectual life.

The Prince

The Prince

Author: Niccolo Machiavelli, Oliver Francis Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

Niccolo Machiavelli provides a remarkably uncompromising picture of the true nature of power, no matter what era or by whom it is exercised. Part of the Macmillan Collector's Library, a series of stunning, clothbound, pocket-sized classics with gold-foiled edges and ribbon markers. These beautiful books make perfect gifts or a treat for any book lover. This edition features an afterword by Oliver Francis. Drawing on examples from the ancient Greeks and Romans and from Machiavelli's contemporaries, The Prince offers - some believed with satirical intent - advice on how a ruler should preserve his power, conduct and warfare, and maintain his reputation. Machiavelli not only influenced many of the great statesmen of his age, but was also one of the founding fathers of modern political thought. The Prince, written in 1513 and published in 1532, is one of the most famous pieces of writing of all time.

Reformation without End Religion, Politics and the Past in Post-Revolutionary England

Reformation without End Religion, Politics and the Past in Post-Revolutionary England

Author: Robert Ingram Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2019

This study provides a radical reassessment of the English Reformation. No one in eighteenth-century England thought that they were living during 'the Enlightenment'; instead, they saw themselves as facing the religious, intellectual and political problems unleashed by the Reformation, which began in the sixteenth century. Moreover, they faced those problems in the aftermath of two bloody seventeenth-century political and religious revolutions. Reformation without end examines how the eighteenth-century English debated the causes and consequences of those revolutions and the thing they thought had caused them, the Reformation. It draws on a wide array of manuscript sources to show how authors crafted and pitched their works. -- .

Tanaka 1587 Japan'S Greatest Unknown Samurai Battle

Tanaka 1587 Japan'S Greatest Unknown Samurai Battle

Author: Stephen Turnbull Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2019

In 1587 the 1,000-strong garrison of tiny Tanaka Castle in Higo Province (modern Kumamoto Prefecture) on Japan's southern island of Kyushu, held out for 100 days against an army ten times their size sent by the great general Toyotomi Hideyoshi. When the castle fell it was burned to the ground, and for four centuries the epic struggle lived on only through a handful of letters, two little-known war chronicles and in the folk memories of the local people who continued to make offerings on the now anonymous hillside to comfort the tormented spirits of Tanaka's dead warriors. In 1986 everything changed. Prompted by the approaching fourth centenary of the battle the local council set in motion a systematic archaeological investigation of the castle site. Many interesting finds were made, but the greatest discovery of all came in 1989 in a distant library when a researcher unearthed what turned out to be Japan's oldest surviving battle map. It featured a detailed drawing of Tanaka Castle during the siege that matched up exactly with the picture that was emerging from the excavation. The unique document also contained so much extra information that, when combined with the archaeological finds, the written materials and local folklore, the almost forgotten siege of Tanaka became one of the best documented battles in the whole of Japan's samurai history. Tanaka 1587 tells the complete story of the epic struggle for the first time outside Japan by using the evidence that is available from history, literature, folklore, archaeology and cartography. It is based on the author's own translations of the chronicles and the archaeological report together with his extensive fieldwork over a period of many years. The story is presented as an exciting (and sometimes violent) historical narrative illustrated with unique photographs and maps. The contribution of the battle's enshrined spirits to present-day folk religion is also assessed, while attitudes towards the site's conservation, preservation and celebration provide a fascinating insight into how modern Japan views and exploits its samurai history in a society that has had to come to terms with a violent past. Before 1987 the siege of Tanaka Castle was virtually unknown beyond its immediate boundaries. Just as thirty years of painstaking work and enthusiastic publicity have transformed its status within Japan, this unique ground-breaking book will enable Tanaka's story to be understood and appreciated by a much wider international audience.

The Campaigns of Sir William Waller, 1642-1645

The Campaigns of Sir William Waller, 1642-1645

Author: Laurence Spring Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/08/2019

Nothing sums up the tragedy of the English Civil War more than the friendship between Sir William Waller and his opponent Sir Ralph Hopton as this war without an enemy. However, Waller was also a general respected by both sides during the war, the Royalist Colonel Walter Slingsby described him as the fox and the best shifter and chooser of ground when he was not master of the field. The Parliamentarian John Vicars in his England's Worthies published in 1647 refers to Waller as one of the most impregnable offensive and defensive walls of the kingdom. His victories in 1642 and early 1643 earned him the nickname of William the Conqueror, and due to his tactics of marching by night to surprise his enemy, the Night Owl. It was Waller who also first mentioned the need for the formation of the New Model Army. Using contemporary accounts to describe events, this book looks at Waller's campaigns from the siege of Portsmouth in June 1642 to April 1645 when his army was disbanded. It includeshis victories in the West in 1643, the raising of a new army in August 1643, the sieges of Basing House and Arundel Castle along with the defence of Farnham and the storming of Alton. Also included is Waller's many battles including Lansdown, Roundway Down, Cheriton, Cropredy Bridge, and the Second Battle of Newbury. The book also covers the logistics of putting Waller's Army into the field, including clothing, arms, and taxation as well as the tension between Waller and the Earl of Essex.