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Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700

See below for a selection of the latest books from Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700 category. Presented with a red border are the Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Disease, Disaster and Death in Mid-Tudor England

Disease, Disaster and Death in Mid-Tudor England

Author: John S. Moore Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

The second half of the sixteenth century was amongst the most turbulent periods of English history. Reformation, political faction, economic decline, disputed succession and foreign wars combined with a prolonged series of poor harvests to create a situation that historians labeled the 'mid-Tudor crisis'. Not least of the problems faced by people at this time was a rising rate of death from disease; which at its height may have seen one in four people dying from a combination of influenza and typhus. As this book argues, such a mortality rate constitutes the largest demographic disaster to strike England since the Black Death two-hundred years before, and dwarfs the death rates both of the seventeenth plague outbreaks, and the 1919 Spanish Flu. In this magisterial study, Dr Moore marshals a phenomenal amount of research to examine the likely impact of this disaster upon an already weakened population. Drawing particularly upon parish registers, he demonstrates that the period witnessed a much higher drop in population than has been hitherto accepted, that in turn leads to a much revised population trend for England during the early modern period. As well as assessing the ramifications of these findings, the book also examines why such a crisis appears to have passed un-noticed - or at least un-commented upon - by most of the contemporaries who lived through it. Based upon twenty-years' research, and backed up by a wealth of detailed statistical evidence, this work offers a fundamental reappraisal of the social and economic history of Tudor England. It demonstrates how disease and mortality played a major role in shaping demography, and thus the development of early modern English society.

Apocalypticism, Millenarianism and Prophecy in Central Europe, c. 1560-1660

Apocalypticism, Millenarianism and Prophecy in Central Europe, c. 1560-1660

Author: Howard Hotson & Vladimir Urbanek Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

The intellectual history of central Europe between the mid-sixteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries has not received the same level of scholarly attention as the period of the earlier Magisterial Reformation. The Holy Roman Empire, increasingly fragmented during this period, was viewed in the nationalist historiography of the nineteenth and early twentieth century as politically and therefore culturally backward, whilst the dominance of Reformation studies in Germany by Lutheran theologians has suppressed the study of a rich variety of intellectual traditions in tension with the mainstream confessions. In order to rescue and map out the complex intellectual geography of this region, this volume addresses the role of millenarianism upon concepts of further, general and ultimately universal reformation. For whilst the centrality of apocalyptic expectation to the world-view of the early protestant reformers is now generally appreciated, scholars are only beginning to reveal an alternative tradition that nourished and rekindled late-medieval hopes, brutally repressed in the early phases of the Reformation, for a dawning new age which would complete the magisterial reformation of theology, church and ritual with a reformation of inner spiritual life, of medicine, philosophy and education, and of state and society. Fully contextualised by a substantial historiographical introduction - surveying for the first time the hitherto largely independent traditions of research on millenarianism in Britain, the Netherlands, Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Scandinavia - the volume not only deepens understanding of eschatological beliefs within the concept of universal reform, but also places future transnational work in this field on a firm foundation for the first time.

A Republican Empire

A Republican Empire

Author: Michael Knapton, Andrea Zannini Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

The Republic of Venice is remembered chiefly as a maritime state, yet from the early fifteenth century it began to exert direct control over a substantial hinterland stretching from the borders of Milan in the west, to the fringes of Germans and Slavic lands to the north and east. For a century it retained this dominant position, before the combined forces of the league of Cambrai forever changed the balance of power with victory over Venice at the battle of Agnadello in 1509 - what had seemed a politically solid and economically prosperous mainland dominion suddenly dissolved, and indeed looked set to disappear permanently. Yet, as this volume clearly demonstrates, this defeat by no means signalled the end of Venice's territorial ambitions. For almost three-hundred years, until it fell under Austrian domination in 1797, the Republic sought to regain a position of influence within the Italian peninsula, and diverted much attention to the retention and expansion of its mainland dominion. Divided into two sections - 'Politics, Institutions and Society' and 'Demography, economy and society' - the book addresses a broad sweep of social, cultural, civic, economic and strategic themes. These are investigated and compared, allowing for revealing conclusion to be drawn that ultimately limit the grounds for comparison between Venice's territorial state and those of the main European monarchies. It argues that whereas the larger states gradually gained in cohesion, centralization and unity, Venice substantially maintained a model of territorial government rooted in the practice of medieval city-states - a model that survived because the Republic's practice of government was flexible enough to adapt to changing national and international circumstances. By building upon, and expanding, recent research investigating the nature of relations between Venice and its territories, this study offers a fascinating perspective upon the extent to which the Republic tried and succeeded in endowing a heterogeneous territorial conglomeration with cohesion and unity.

Dress and Hygiene in Early Modern England

Dress and Hygiene in Early Modern England

Author: Susan North Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

This book examines the role of linen undergarments in concepts of propriety and health in early-modern England. While medical history has written about hygiene, dress historians about linen undergarments, and women's history about laundry, this is the first book to bring these separate narratives together. Acknowledging the difficulties in researching the habits of cleanliness in the past, particularly the unreliability of personal testimony for reasons of bias and modesty, the study sets out a methodology for researching aspects of bodily hygiene, first delineating in full what the advice was in both conduct and medical literature. In the latter, clean wearing linen was believed to play an important role in good health, and dirty linen implicated in the spread of disease - particularly plague and fevers. However, the relationship between medical theory and the practice of clean linen proved to be a complicated one. Research has uncovered specific hypotheses during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries that proposed that flannel was a better material for undergarments, and that providing clean linens for a fever patient might prove fatal. Dress and Hygiene in Early Modern England analyses these conflicting concepts during the long-seventeenth century, and their resolution in favour of clean linen in the late eighteenth century. By incorporating not only dress, social and medical histories, but also evidence from surviving clothing, the book serves as an example of an interdisciplinary methodology and a potential model for other histories of other unspoken subjects.

Portraits in Silk

Portraits in Silk

Author: Lesley Ellis (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque) Miller Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

French silk manufacturing reached its apogee in the eighteenth century, offering a dazzling and constantly evolving range of textiles made from the most exotic and costly combination of fibres for both domestic and international markets. In this competitive business and artistic environment some designers and manufacturers acquired substantial wealth and quasi mythical status, while others eked out a modest and largely anonymous existence. Drawing on a wide range of newly discovered archival and material evidence, this book offers a series of portraits of both the famous and the 'faceless' as a vehicle for evaluating the nature and status of the trade and the conditions under which its key participant flourished or failed. The life stories of seven men reveal the particularities and concerns of a society in transition, grounded in traditional guild organisation yet happy to exploit new commercial openings. The biographies afford insights into social hierarchies through investigation of the relationship between art and manufacturing, local and national networks, and reveal the 'culture' of commerce through an analysis of their 'enlightened' commercial education and continued interest in learning. They also demonstrate the vagaries of a freelance career in design, through analysis of the attractions, disappointments and rewards of industrial espionage and the mechanics of technological and aesthetic transfer. Combining elements of cultural, artistic and commercial history, this book provides a fascinating insight into one of the defining products of ancien regime France, and its contribution to eighteenth century society, trade and consumption.

Ambrosius Catharinus

Ambrosius Catharinus

Author: Patrick Preston Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Though by 1520, the Lutheran revolt had transformed the long-standing problem of reforming the Church into a major crisis, there was no serious reform initiative from the papacy before 1536. The debate about what was wrong and what was to be done about it had however been under way from the early 1520s. An important contributor to it was the Dominican theologian Ambrosius Catharinus Politus, a former professor of civil law at the University of Siena, who in 1520 had been called upon to defend the Church against Luther, then at the height of his powers. He was not only the foremost Italian anti-Lutheran polemicist of his day, but also an ardent Immaculist and critic of the shortcomings of his own order. By 1541, he was participating in the debates over the divisive topics of predestination, justification and original sin. He attended the Council of Trent/Bologna 1545-48 as a papal theologian where he rapidly became the trusted adviser of Gian Maria del Monte, the future pope Julius III, with whose support he became first Bishop of Minori in 1547 and then Archbishop of Conza in 1551. He nevertheless continued his polemic against the Lutherans and the members of his own order. No major study of Catharinus has been written since Josef Schweizer's 'Ambrosius Catharinus Politus' in 1910. The time is now ripe for an up-to-date work on Catharinus based not only on original sources but also on a thorough acquaintance with modern scholarship on the first phase of the Counter-Reformation. This study concentrates on the last 12 years of Catharinus's life, when he emerged from relative insignificance to play an important part at the Council of Trent, and is a work of primary scholarship, involving detailed analysis of Catharinus's writings.

The Dutch Boerhaavians and Enlightenment Medicine of Body and Soul

The Dutch Boerhaavians and Enlightenment Medicine of Body and Soul

Author: Rina Knoeff Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Herman Boerhaave was the most famous and influential medical teacher in early eighteenth-century Europe. His death in 1738 is generally regarded as the marking the end of the 'Golden Age' of Dutch science and the beginning of the chemico-medical revolution inaugurated by the work of Lavoisier in France at the end of the century. Yet as this book demonstrates, such a simple linear narrative ignores the rich and on-going debates that shaped medical chemistry during the middle years of the eighteenth century. Instead of regarding Boerhaave's death as a stopping point, Rina Knoeff offers in this book a very different perspective, one that identifies an ongoing Boerhaavian medical tradition central to Dutch Enlightenment science and culture. Instead of viewing Boerhaave as the 'end of an era', she views Boerhaave as the beginning of something excitingly new. Rather than fitting Boerhaave into the 'old' - Cartesian/Newtonian - mechanical tradition, Knoeff promotes the concept of Boerhaave as 'father' of the new medical thinking in Enlightenment Europe. She argues that even after his death, Boerhaave's legacy continued to exercise a profound influence upon Enlightenment medicine and science. Boerhaave's pupils continued to promote his emphasis on chemically exploring the many 'latent peculiar powers of bodies', and through their teaching across Europe, Boerhaave's ideas continued to be circulated. As such it is shown how Boerhaavian medical and chemical ideas continued to circulate and inspire the scientific climate in which Lavoisier's revolution could develop at the end of the century.

Renaissance Studies

Renaissance Studies

Author: Brendan (University College Cork, Ireland) Dooley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Renaissance Studies is a historiography textbook with a twist. At the heart of the book are six key themes the novelty of the renaissance, the instruments of diffusion, the influx from the Middle East and Asia, the 'quest', cultures and structures and the sacred and profane. Each chapter provides a general view of the specific area of its remit, its proponents, the documentary sources in question, and the significant research tools that are being used or developed for answering some of the major questions in renaissance studies. By focusing on some of the most powerful forces driving human activity, this book conveys the excitement of a period that has fascinated generations.

Renaissance Studies

Renaissance Studies

Author: Brendan (University College Cork, Ireland) Dooley Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Renaissance Studies is a historiography textbook with a twist. At the heart of the book are six key themes the novelty of the renaissance, the instruments of diffusion, the influx from the Middle East and Asia, the 'quest', cultures and structures and the sacred and profane. Each chapter provides a general view of the specific area of its remit, its proponents, the documentary sources in question, and the significant research tools that are being used or developed for answering some of the major questions in renaissance studies. By focusing on some of the most powerful forces driving human activity, this book conveys the excitement of a period that has fascinated generations.

Ceremony, Ritual and Kingcraft at the Court of Charles I

Ceremony, Ritual and Kingcraft at the Court of Charles I

Author: Nile K. (Phillips Academy, USA) Blunt Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

This is a unique study of the relationship between religious ritual and ceremonial dining. Blunt's work is based on primary sources documenting the daily running of the king's household and will be of interest to scholars researching the court of Charles I and its material culture as well as the religious and political history of his reign.

British Politics and Foreign Policy, 1758-70

British Politics and Foreign Policy, 1758-70

Author: Jeremy Black Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Following on from Professor Black's previous volumes, this book continues his exploration of British politics and foreign policy between the Hanoverian accession in 1714 and the end of the War of American Independence in 1783. This fourth book in the sequence, covering the period 1758-70, consciously avoids treating the end of the Seven Years' War in 1763 as a stopping point, and instead continues its investigation into the post-war situation. This provides the reader with a valuable study in continuities before and after the war, as well as highlighting how the period was essentially one of success for Britain - one in which she won a major war with France, defeated Spain, constructed a major empire, and played a key role in the post-war Atlantic world. It thus contrasts with the previous years of crisis covered in the 1744-57 volume, and the repeated failures in the 1770s to confront Russian expansionism, and to reverse tendencies towards isolation in the face of foreign intervention in the War of American Independence. In so doing the book examines the processes of a largely successful foreign policy and politics, both in the more immediate senses of diplomacy and ministerial, parliamentary and public politics, and with reference to broader questions of the links between Britain's international position and the nature of Britain as nation and state. An integral part of professor Black's ongoing analysis of British policy between 1714 and 1783, the book offers a major reassessment of the period, one that provides an informed guide to the parameters established by domestic political circumstances.

Medicine and Monstrous Generation in the Seventeenth Century

Medicine and Monstrous Generation in the Seventeenth Century

Author: Signe Nipper Nielsen Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/2021

Through a case study of the work of the renowned anatomist and keen collector Thomas Bartholin (1616-1680), this book contributes to the cultural history of early modern natural philosophy, medicine and the body by focusing on the widespread fascination with monstrous generation and the marvellous in seventeenth-century medicine. Bartholin was a professor at the University of Copenhagen and a committed Lutheran. His extensive works show that he was mainly preoccupied with the extraordinary, monstrous and singular. In his view, it was above all in generation that nature tended to go astray and generation was therefore a perfect object of investigation for the physician who wanted to explore the wonders of nature. Bartholin reported among many other things on women who gave birth to hens' eggs, rat-like creatures and strange monstrous births. Bartholin's works provide a valuable vantage point from which to revisit seventeenth-century learned concepts and practices related to generation, showing the similarities and differences between Bartholin's natural inquiry - informed by his Lutheran-Melanchtonian background - and his peers in early modern Europe. The book also provides a fresh and broader perspective on the history of medicine, monsters and generation by arguing that in order to understand early modern notions of generation, we must widen and historicise the concept. The book thus unites various historical approaches, including the history of medicine, the history of science and the history and anthropology of the body. It moreover deepens our knowledge of the relationship between medicine and religion and elucidates the early modern redrawing of boundaries between natural, preternatural and supernatural.