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Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500

See below for a selection of the latest books from Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 category. Presented with a red border are the Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Last Days of Owain Glyndwr, The

Last Days of Owain Glyndwr, The

Author: Gruffydd Aled Williams Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 13/10/2017

Consorts of the Caliphs Women and the Court of Baghdad

Consorts of the Caliphs Women and the Court of Baghdad

Author: Julia Bray, Ibn al-Sai, Marina Warner Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/09/2017

Accounts of remarkable women at the world's most powerful court Consorts of the Caliphs is a seventh/thirteenth-century compilation of anecdotes about thirty-eight women who were consorts to those in power, most of them concubines of the early Abbasid caliphs and wives of latter-day caliphs and sultans. This slim but illuminating volume is one of the few surviving texts by the prolific Baghdadi scholar Ibn al-Sa'i, who chronicled the academic and political elites of his city in the final years of the Abbasid dynasty and the period following the cataclysmic Mongol invasion of 656 H/1258 AD. In this work, Ibn al-Sa'i is keen to forge a connection between the munificent wives of his time and the storied lovers of the so-called golden age of Baghdad. Thus, from the earlier period, we find Harun al-Rashid pining for his brother's beautiful slave, Ghadir, and the artistry of such musical and literary celebrities as Arib and Fadl, who bested the male poets and singers of their day. From times closer to Ibn al-Sa?i's own, we meet women such as Banafsha, who endowed law colleges, had bridges built, and provisioned pilgrims bound for Mecca; slave women whose funeral services were led by caliphs; and noble Saljuq princesses from Afghanistan. Informed by the author's own sources, his insider knowledge, and well-known literary materials, these singular biographical sketches bring the belletristic culture of the Baghdad court to life, particularly in the personal narratives and poetry of culture heroines otherwise lost to history.

Chretien de Troyes The Story of the Grail

Chretien de Troyes The Story of the Grail

Author: Robert White Linker Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/08/2017

This first English translation of the twelfth-century work retells the tale of King Arthur's court and the search for the Holy Grail. Linker's translation avoids false archaisms and presents a language that is strange and lovely from the medieval world. Originally published in 1952. A UNC Press Enduring Edition - UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Shi'i Doctrine, Mu'tazili Theology Al-Sharif Murtada and Imami Discourse

Shi'i Doctrine, Mu'tazili Theology Al-Sharif Murtada and Imami Discourse

Author: Hussein Ali Abdulsater Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2017

God is not free to act; He is bound by human ethics. To be just, He must create an individual of perfect intellect and infallible morality. People are obligated to submit to this person; otherwise eternal damnation awaits them. While these claims may be interpreted as an affront to God's power, an insult to human judgement and a justification for despotism, Shi'i Muslims in the eleventh century eagerly adopted them in their attempts to forge a 'rational' religious discourse. They utilised everything from literary studies and political theory to natural philosophy and metaphysical speculation in support of this project. This book presents the contribution of al-Sharif al-Murtada (d. 1044) of Baghdad, the thinker most responsible for this irreversible change, which remains central to Imami identity. It analyses his intellectual project and establishes the dynamic context which prompted him to pour the old wine of Shi'i doctrine into the new wineskin of systematic Mu'tazili theology.

Warfare and the Miraculous in the Chronicles of the First Crusade

Warfare and the Miraculous in the Chronicles of the First Crusade

Author: Elizabeth Lapina Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/05/2017

In Warfare and the Miraculous in the Chronicles of the First Crusade, Elizabeth Lapina examines a variety of these chronicles, written both by participants in the crusade and by those who stayed behind. Her goal is to understand the enterprise from the perspective of its contemporaries and near contemporaries. Lapina analyzes the diversity of ways in which the chroniclers tried to justify the First Crusade as a holy war, where physical violence could be not just sinless, but salvific. The book focuses on accounts of miracles reported to have happened in the course of the crusade, especially the miracle of the intervention of saints in the Battle of Antioch. Lapina shows why and how chroniclers used these miracles to provide historical precedent and to reconcile the messiness of history with the conviction that history was ordered by divine will. In doing so, she provides an important glimpse into the intellectual efforts of the chronicles and their authors, illuminating their perspectives toward the concepts of history, salvation, and the East. Warfare and the Miraculous in the Chronicles of the First Crusade demonstrates how these narratives sought to position the crusade as an event in the time line of sacred history. Lapina offers original insights into the effects of the crusade on the Western imaginary as well as how medieval authors thought about and represented history.

Rewriting Magic An Exegesis of the Visionary Autobiography of a Fourteenth-Century French Monk

Rewriting Magic An Exegesis of the Visionary Autobiography of a Fourteenth-Century French Monk

Author: Claire Fanger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/05/2017

In Rewriting Magic, Claire Fanger explores a fourteenth-century text called The Flowers of Heavenly Teaching. Written by a Benedictine monk named John of Morigny, the work all but disappeared from the historical record, and it is only now coming to light again in multiple versions and copies. While John's book largely comprises an extended set of prayers for gaining knowledge, The Flowers of Heavenly Teaching is unusual among prayer books of its time because it includes a visionary autobiography with intimate information about the book's inspiration and composition. Through the window of this record, we witness how John reconstructs and reconsecrates a condemned liturgy for knowledge acquisition: the ars notoria of Solomon. John's work was the subject of intense criticism and public scandal, and his book was burned as heretical in 1323. The trauma of these experiences left its imprint on the book, but in unexpected and sometimes baffling ways. Fanger decodes this imprint even as she relays the narrative of how she learned to understand it. In engaging prose, she explores the twin processes of knowledge acquisition in John's visionary autobiography and her own work of discovery as she reconstructed the background to his extraordinary book. Fanger's approach to her subject exemplifies innovative historical inquiry, research, and methodology. Part theology, part historical anthropology, part biblio-memoir, Rewriting Magic relates a story that will have deep implications for the study of medieval life, monasticism, prayer, magic, and religion.

Michael Psellos on Literature and Art A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics

Michael Psellos on Literature and Art A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics

Author: Michael Psellos Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/04/2017

Michael Psellos has long been known as a key figure in the history of Byzantine literary and intellectual culture, but his theoretical and critical reflections on literature and art are little known outside of a small circle of specialists. Most famous for his Chronographia, a history of eleventh-century Byzantine emperors and their reigns, Psellos also excelled in describing as well as prescribing practices and rules for literary discourse and visual culture. The ambition of Michael Psellos on Literature and Art is to illustrate an important chapter in the history of Greek literary and art criticism and introduce precisely this aspect of Psellian writing to a wider public. The editors of this volume present thirty Psellian texts, all of which have been translated - some in part, most in their entirety - into English. In the majority of cases, the works are translated for the first time in any modern language, and several are discussed at length here for the first time. They are grouped into two separate sections, which roughly translate to two areas of theoretical reflection associated with the modern terms literature and art. As such, these texts display Byzantine views, attitudes, and ultimately tastes regarding what is thought to be beautiful as well as moral, and appealing as well as mentally and psychologically effective, in texts and artistic objects. Contributors: Christine Angelidi, Christopher M. Geadrities, Elizabeth A. Fisher, David Jenkins, Anthony Kaldellis, Demetrios Kritsotakis, Antony Littlewood, and Jeffrey Walker.

Michael Psellos on Literature and Art A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics

Michael Psellos on Literature and Art A Byzantine Perspective on Aesthetics

Author: Michael Psellos Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2017

Michael Psellos has long been known as a key figure in the history of Byzantine literary and intellectual culture, but his theoretical and critical reflections on literature and art are little known outside of a small circle of specialists. Most famous for his Chronographia, a history of eleventh-century Byzantine emperors and their reigns, Psellos also excelled in describing as well as prescribing practices and rules for literary discourse and visual culture. The ambition of Michael Psellos on Literature and Art is to illustrate an important chapter in the history of Greek literary and art criticism and introduce precisely this aspect of Psellian writing to a wider public. The editors of this volume present thirty Psellian texts, all of which have been translated - some in part, most in their entirety - into English. In the majority of cases, the works are translated for the first time in any modern language, and several are discussed at length here for the first time. They are grouped into two separate sections, which roughly translate to two areas of theoretical reflection associated with the modern terms literature and art. As such, these texts display Byzantine views, attitudes, and ultimately tastes regarding what is thought to be beautiful as well as moral, and appealing as well as mentally and psychologically effective, in texts and artistic objects. Contributors: Christine Angelidi, Christopher M. Geadrities, Elizabeth A. Fisher, David Jenkins, Anthony Kaldellis, Demetrios Kritsotakis, Antony Littlewood, and Jeffrey Walker.

Hazards of the Dark Arts Advice for Medieval Princes on Witchcraft and Magic

Hazards of the Dark Arts Advice for Medieval Princes on Witchcraft and Magic

Author: Richard Kieckhefer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/04/2017

This volume comprises English translations of two fundamentally important texts on magic and witchcraft in the fifteenth century: Johannes Hartlieb's Book of All Forbidden Arts and Ulrich Molitoris's On Witches and Pythonesses. Written by laymen and aimed at secular authorities, these works advocated that town leaders and royalty alike should vigorously uproot and prosecute practitioners of witchcraft and magic. Though inquisitors and theologians promulgated the witch trials of late medieval times, lay rulers saw the prosecutions through. But local officials, princes, and kings could be unreliable; some were skeptical about the reality and danger of witchcraft, while others dabbled in the occult themselves. Borrowing from theological and secular sources, Hartlieb and Molitoris agitated against this order in favor of zealously persecuting occultists. Organized as a survey of the seven occult arts, Hartlieb's text is a systematic treatise on the dangers of superstition and magic. Molitoris's text presents a dialogue on the activities of witches, including vengeful sorcery, the transformation of humans into animals, and fornication with the devil. Taken together, these tracts show that laymen exerted significant influence on ridding society of their imagined threat. Precisely translated by Richard Kieckhefer, Hazards of the Dark Arts includes an insightful introduction that discusses the authors, their sources and historical environments, the writings themselves, and the influence they had in the development of ideas about witchcraft.

Harold The King Who Fell at Hastings

Harold The King Who Fell at Hastings

Author: Peter Rex Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 13/04/2017

Harold Godwinson, King of England, was unable to defend his realm from William the Conqueror's invading Norman army in 1066. The Normans wreaked havoc across the country and changed the history of England forever. This full-scale biography of England's last Anglo-Saxon king reveals an astute political operator who, as Earl of Wessex, won the affection of the English people and the support of Edward the Confessor to succeed him. Peter Rex tells the story of a formidable warrior-king killed in battle in defence of his kingdom.

Ireland: The Struggle for Power From the Dark Ages to the Jacobites

Ireland: The Struggle for Power From the Dark Ages to the Jacobites

Author: Jeffrey James Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/04/2017

Ireland's history has been shaped by the many invaders who have set foot on the country's shores. For centuries conflict raged amongst the native Irish, Vikings, Anglo-Normans, English and Scots, then the Catholics and Protestants. This real-life game of thrones has moulded the social, political and military history of the nation, so often its problems caused by its proximity to more powerful neighbours. Being a largely 'empty' land, Ireland was an attractive proposition for landless knights, and the Norman Conquest of Ireland in 1171 saw a group of carpetbagging Anglo-Normans begin to carve up the country. Without the incursions of the Vikings and Anglo-Normans, Ireland would not be the country it is today. Beginning with Ireland's earliest history, Ireland spans the centuries, covering the period of Scottish raiding during the War of Scottish Independence and the Elizabethan and Stuart plantations. The seventeenth century witnessed rebellions against English rule and Oliver Cromwell's storming of Drogheda and Wexford. Upon the installation of William III on the English throne, Ireland became a battleground between competing European powers, the struggle culminating in decisive defeats for James II at the battles of the Boyne and Aughrim, the bitter legacy of which has blighted modern times.

England in Europe English Royal Women and Literary Patronage, c.1000-c.1150

England in Europe English Royal Women and Literary Patronage, c.1000-c.1150

Author: Elizabeth Muir Tyler Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/04/2017

In England in Europe, Elizabeth Tyler focuses on two histories: the Encomium Emmae Reginae, written for Emma the wife of the thelred II and Cnut, and The Life of King Edward, written for Edith the wife of Edward the Confessor. Tyler offers a bold literary and historical analysis of both texts and reveals how the two queens actively engaged in the patronage of history-writing and poetry to exercise their royal authority. Tyler's innovative combination of attention to intertextuality and regard for social networks emphasizes the role of women at the centre of Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman court literature. In doing so, she argues that both Emma and Edith's negotiation of conquests and factionalism created powerful models of queenly patronage that were subsequently adopted by individuals such as Queen Margaret of Scotland, Countess Adela of Blois, Queen Edith/Matilda, and Queen Adeliza. England in Europe sheds new lighton the connections between English, French, and Flemish history-writing and poetry and illustrates the key role Anglo-Saxon literary culture played in European literature long after 1066.