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Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500

See below for a selection of the latest books from Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 category. Presented with a red border are the Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Awakening A History of the Western Mind AD 500 - AD 1700

The Awakening A History of the Western Mind AD 500 - AD 1700

Author: Charles Freeman Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/04/2020

The Awakening amounts to nothing less than a history of European ideas over the vast period AD 500 to AD 1700 - from the twilight of Antiquity to the dawn of the Enlightenment. Charles Freeman traces the rebirth of European thought in the broadest possible sense, his agenda embracing political thought, philosophy and theology as well as art and literature. His account is informed by the latest scholarly thinking in all these areas, but manages to weave the many strands of Europe's intellectual development across the Medieval and Early Modern eras into a coherent and readable narrative that moves forward at a smart pace. This is an ambitious but accessible history of the evolution of the modern world.

An Old English Martyrology (1900) Re-edited from Manuscripts in the Libraries of the British Museum and of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

An Old English Martyrology (1900) Re-edited from Manuscripts in the Libraries of the British Museum and of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

Author: George Herzfeld Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/03/2020

First published in 1900, this Reader uses four manuscripts from the British Museum and Corpus Christi College Cambridge to present a thorough introduction along with a dual-language edition of the text. The original manuscripts, as Herzfeld demonstrates, are of varying qualities and comprise of the Anglian, West Saxon, Kentish and Mercian dialects. The re-edited text is presented alongside historical remarks, criticism of the manuscript, the text's ultimate date and place of origin and an exploration of its potential sources.

The Cambridge World History of Violence

The Cambridge World History of Violence

Author: Matthew (University of Miami) Gordon Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/03/2020

Violence permeated much of social life across the vast geographical space of the European, Asian, and Islamic worlds and through the broad sweep of what is often termed the Middle Millennium (roughly 500 to 1500). Focusing on four contexts in which violence occurred across this huge area, the contributors to this volume explore the formation of centralized polities through war and conquest; institution building and ideological expression by these same polities; control of extensive trade networks; and the emergence and dominance of religious ecumenes. Attention is also given to the idea of how theories of violence are relevant to the specific historical circumstances discussed in the volume's chapters. A final section on the depiction of violence, both visual and literary, demonstrates the ubiquity of societal efforts to confront meanings of violence during this longue duree.

The Map of Knowledge How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found: A History in Seven Cities

The Map of Knowledge How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found: A History in Seven Cities

Author: Violet Moller Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 19/03/2020

'A lovely debut from a gifted young author. Violet Moller brings to life the ways in which knowledge reached us from antiquity to the present day in a book that is as delightful as it is readable.' Peter Frankopan, author of The Silk Roads In The Map of Knowledge Violet Moller traces the journey taken by the ideas of three of the greatest scientists of antiquity - Euclid, Galen and Ptolemy - through seven cities and over a thousand years. In it, we follow them from sixth-century Alexandria to ninth-century Baghdad, from Muslim Cordoba to Catholic Toledo, from Salerno's medieval medical school to Palermo, capital of Sicily's vibrant mix of cultures, and - finally - to Venice, where that great merchant city's printing presses would enable Euclid's geometry, Ptolemy's system of the stars and Galen's vast body of writings on medicine to spread even more widely. In tracing these fragile strands of knowledge from century to century, from east to west and north to south, Moller also reveals the web of connections between the Islamic world and Christendom, connections that would both preserve and transform astronomy, mathematics and medicine from the early Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Vividly told and with a dazzling cast of characters, The Map of Knowledge is an evocative, nuanced and vibrant account of our common intellectual heritage. 'An endlessly fascinating book, rich in detail, capacious and humane in vision.' Stephen Greenblatt, author of The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

The Bastard's Sons Robert, William and Henry of Normandy

The Bastard's Sons Robert, William and Henry of Normandy

Author: Jeffrey James Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/03/2020

William the Conqueror's intellect is said to have remained clear right up to his death. He would have questioned whether any of his three sons individually had the ability to rule the troublesome amalgam of England, Normandy and Maine once he was gone. The Bastard's Sons is the story of those three men: Robert, William and Henry of Normandy. Of Robert, the dying king is said to have claimed he was 'a proud and silly prodigal', adding that 'the country which is subject to his dominion will be truly wretched'. Yet Robert became a great crusader. William got on better with his namesake, known to us as William Rufus for his florid looks. He was, like his father, of kingship material, and might have gained the throne of England on his father's nod, but, equally plausibly, orchestrated a coup. The youngest of the Bastard's sons, Henry, inherited money from his father, but not land. To placate Henry, the Conqueror is alleged to have told him that one day he would gain both England and Normandy. The stage was set for an epic power struggle between the three men and their barons, who held lands on both sides of the Channel and were thus caught in a difficult position. A mysterious death in the forest, a crusading hero's return and the tenacity of an overlooked third son would all combine to see this issue settled once and for all.

The Mythology of the 'Princes in the Tower'

The Mythology of the 'Princes in the Tower'

Author: John Ashdown-Hill Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/03/2020

When did the term 'Princes in the Tower' come into usage, who invented it, and to whom did it refer? To the general public the term is synonymous with the supposedly murdered boy King Edward V and his younger brother Richard, Duke of York, sons of Edward IV. But were those boys genuinely held against their will in the Tower? Would their mother, Elizabeth Widville, have released her son Richard from sanctuary with her if she believed she would be putting his life in danger? The children of Edward IV were declared bastards in 1483 and Richard, Duke of Gloucester, was offered the throne. But after Bosworth, in order to marry their sister Elizabeth of York, Henry VII needed to make her legitimate again. If the boys were alive at that time then Edward V would once again have become the rightful king. Following the discovery of some bones in the Tower in 1674 they were interred in a marble urn in Westminster Abbey as the remains of the two sons of Edward IV. What evidence exists, or existed at the time, to prove these indeed were the remains of two fifteenth-century male children? What did the 1933 urn opening reveal? John Ashdown-Hill is uniquely placed to answer these questions. By working with geneticists and scientists, and exploring the mtDNA haplogroup of the living all-female-line collateral descendant of the brothers, he questions the orthodoxy and strips away the myths.

Inscribing Texts in Byzantium Continuities and Transformations

Inscribing Texts in Byzantium Continuities and Transformations

Author: Marc D. Lauxtermann Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/03/2020

In spite of the striking abundance of extant primary material, Byzantine epigraphy remains uncharted territory. The volume of the Proceedings of the 49th SPBS Spring Symposium aims to promote the field of Byzantine epigraphy as a whole, and topics and subjects covered include: Byzantine attitudes towards the inscribed word, the questions of continuity and transformation, the context and function of epigraphic evidence, the levels of formality and authority, the material aspect of writing, and the verbal, visual and symbolic meaning of inscribed texts. The collection is intended as a valuable scholarly resource presenting and examining a substantial quantity of diverse epigraphic material, and outlining the chronological development of epigraphic habits, and of individual epigraphic genres in Byzantium. The contributors also discuss the methodological questions of collecting, presenting and interpreting the most representative Byzantine inscriptional material, and addressing epigraphic material to make it relevant to a wider scholarly community.

Warfare and the Making of Early Medieval Italy (568-652)

Warfare and the Making of Early Medieval Italy (568-652)

Author: Eduardo Fabbro Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/03/2020

Devastated by two decades of war and ravaged by the spread of the plague, large parts of Italy fell quickly into the hands of a group known to history as the Lombards. By the early 570s the Lombards were firmly established in Italy, which they ruled without ever fully unifying it. The events of the late sixth century shaped early medieval Italy. They also affected how Italian history was written: the Lombards were blamed for plunging the peninsula into the darkness of the Middle Ages, finally ending Roman civilization. But was it really a 'barbarian invasion' that created medieval Italy? What was the role of the imperial authorities and the papacy? In Warfare and the Making of Early Medieval Italy, Eduardo Fabbro brings a new take on the changes that shook Italy at the end of the sixth century. Moving past traditional narratives of barbarians and battles, the book re-evaluates the impact of war in creating early medieval Italy. Fabbro brings to the fore a complex picture that includes not only invading barbarians but also rebelling soldiers, disgruntled farmers, vexed commanders, and cunning adventurers trying to make the best of a bad situation. Through a complete reassessment of contemporary and later sources, this book rewrites the history of the first decades of Lombard rule and shows that warfare's impact went far beyond battles and invasions; it rewired the social and political links that bound the region.

The Bonds of Humanity Cicero's Legacies in European Social and Political Thought, ca. 1100-ca. 1550

The Bonds of Humanity Cicero's Legacies in European Social and Political Thought, ca. 1100-ca. 1550

Author: Cary J. Nederman Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/02/2020

Of the great philosophers of pagan antiquity, Marcus Tullius Cicero is the only one whose ideas were continuously accessible to the Christian West following the collapse of the Roman Empire. Yet, in marked contrast with other ancient philosophers, Cicero has largely been written out of the historical narrative on early European political thought, and the reception of his ideas has barely been studied. The Bonds of Humanity corrects this glaring oversight, arguing that the influence of Cicero's ideas in medieval and early modern Europe was far more pervasive than previously believed. In this book, Cary J. Nederman presents a persuasive counternarrative to the widely accepted belief in the dominance of Aristotelian thought. Surveying the work of a diverse range of thinkers from the twelfth to the sixteenth century, including John of Salisbury, Brunetto Latini, Marsiglio of Padua, Christine de Pizan, and Bartolome de Las Casas, Nederman shows that these men and women inherited, deployed, and adapted key Ciceronian themes. He argues that the rise of scholastic Aristotelianism in the thirteenth century did not supplant but rather supplemented and bolstered Ciceronian ideas, and he identifies the character and limits of Ciceronianism that distinguish it from other schools of philosophy. Highly original and compelling, this paradigm-shifting book will be greeted enthusiastically by students and scholars of early European political thought and intellectual history, particularly those engaged in the conversation about the role played by ancient and early Christian ideas in shaping the theories of later times.

The Holy Grail The Legend, the History, the Evidence

The Holy Grail The Legend, the History, the Evidence

Author: Justin E. Griffin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/01/2020

The existence or nonexistence of the Holy Grail has long been debated, and many of these debates focus on the intellectual or psychological aspects of it. This work explores the events that gave rise to the legend of the Holy Grail and pays special attention to the texts that form the body of the legend, as well as historical facts about the life of Christ, the Crusades, and the fall from grace of the Knights Templar. The book examines the legitimacy of the claims made by several present-day believers and also introduces a new theory of multiple grails (and the evidence supporting this theory), which, the author believes, answers many of the otherwise unanswered questions surrounding the Holy Grail.

Medieval Jerusalem Forging an Islamic City in Spaces Sacred to Christians and Jews

Medieval Jerusalem Forging an Islamic City in Spaces Sacred to Christians and Jews

Author: Jacob Lassner Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/01/2020

Medieval Jerusalem examines an old question that has recently surfaced and given rise to spirited discussion among Islamic historians and archeologists: what role did a city revered for its holiness play in the unfolding politics of the early Islamic period? Was there an historic moment when the city, holy to Jews, Christians, and Muslims, may have been considered as the administrative center of a vast Islamic world, as some scholars on early Islam have recently claimed? Medieval Jerusalem also emphasizes the city's evolution as a revered Islamic religious site comparable to the holy cities Mecca and Medina. Examining Muslim historiography and religious lore in light of Jewish traditions about the city, Jacob Lassner points out how these reworked Jewish traditions and the imposing monumental Islamic architecture of the city were meant to demonstrate that Islam had superseded Judaism and Christianity as the religion for all monotheists. Jacob Lassner interrogates the literary sources of medieval Islamic historiography and their modern interpreters as if they were witnesses in a court of law, and applies the same method for the arguments about the monuments of the city's material culture, including the great archaeological discoveries along the south wall of the ancient Temple Mount. Medieval Jerusalem will be of interest to a broad range of readers given the significance of the city in the current politics of the Near East. It will in part serve as a corrective to narratives of Jerusalem's past that are currently popular for scholarly and political reasons.

Llanilltud - The Story of a Celtic Christian Community

Llanilltud - The Story of a Celtic Christian Community

Author: Philip Morris Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/01/2020