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Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500

See below for a selection of the latest books from Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 category. Presented with a red border are the Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Early history: c 500 to c 1450/1500 books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Bede and the Cosmos Theology and Nature in the Eighth Century

Bede and the Cosmos Theology and Nature in the Eighth Century

Author: Eoghan Ahern Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/07/2020

Bede and the Cosmos examines Bede's cosmology-his understanding of the universe and its laws. It explores his ideas regarding both the structure and mechanics of the created world and the relationship of that world to its Creator. Beginning with On the Nature of Things and moving on to survey his writings in other genres, it demonstrates the key role that natural philosophy played in shaping Bede's worldview, and explores the ramifications that this had on his cultural, theological and historical thought. From questions about angelic bodies and the destruction of the world at judgement day, to subtle arguments about free will and the meaning of history, Bede's fascinating and unique engagement with the natural world is explored in this comprehensive study.

The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World

The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World

Author: Bonnie Effros Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/07/2020

The Merovingian world has become more visible in Anglophone historical studies in the past two decades as attention to the social and economic networks of empires and modes of communication has begun to change older frameworks that viewed these centuries in terms of decline and characterized them as the Dark Ages . The Merovingian epoch witnessed, something which we understand from the perspective of hindsight, a tilt to the middle ages. The forty-six essays included in this volume thus highlight the vitality and importance of the Merovingian kingdoms in the fifth through eighth centuries. Rather than suggest that this was a chaotic and obscure interlude between the Fall of the Roman Empire and the Rise of the Carolingians, and named for a dynasty with a reputation for few accomplishments and even fewer memorable kings, the essays demonstrate that the Merovingian era is an important field in its own right. The Handbook's contributors highlight recent research that moves beyond the political developments that were until recently the bread and butter of most historians, and include many contributions based on material culture that shed new light on subjects that previously were inaccessible. They demonstrate that the Merovingian world was at the center of a wide-ranging Merovingian empire of elites, peasants, economies, and cultures, and its story must be told through archaeology, bio-archaeology, architecture, hagiographic literature, manuscripts, liturgy, visionary literature and eschatology, patristics, numismatics, and material culture. In addition to mainland France , the essays encompass the geographic conduits of power, culture, and trade that connected the Merovingian world with Anglo-Saxon England, Ireland, Frisia, Spain, Italy, North Africa, and the Byzantine Empire. This network-empire of intersecting (and often conflicting) identities, political interests, religions, economies, patronage, and cultures, were intrinsically connected to contemporary developments not just among the Burgundians and Visigoths, but among the Byzantines, Avars, Anglo-Saxons, Frisians, and the Irish, fields that were once viewed, like the Merovingians themselves, in isolation. These important developments reveal why the Merovingian period has attracted new audiences and why it will never be viewed as a backwater again.

Viking London

Viking London

Author: Thomas Williams Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/07/2020

Viking Britain author Thomas Williams returns with a brief history of the interaction between the Vikings and the British to tell the story of the occupation of London. The Vikings remoulded the world, changed the language, and upended the dynamics of power and trade. Monasteries and settlements burned, ancient dynasties were extinguished. And nowhere in these islands saw more aggression than London. Between 842 and 1016, the city was subjected repeatedly to serious assault. In this short history, bestselling historian Thomas Williams recounts the profound impact Viking raiders from the North had on London. Delving into London's darkest age, he charts how the city was transformed in this period by immigrants and natives, kings and commoners, into the fulcrum of national power and identity. London emerged as a hub of trade, production and international exchange, a financial centre, a political prize, a fiercely independent and often intractable cauldron of spirited and rowdy townsfolk: a place that, a thousand years ago, already embodied much of what London was to become and still remains. This remarkable book takes the reader into a city of spectres, to its ancient past, to timeworn street names hidden beneath concrete underpasses, to the crypts of old churches, to a stretch of the old river bank, or the depths of museum collections. Nothing is lost in the city. And memories of the Vikings hover like a miasma in these places, blowing across the mud and shingle on the Thames foreshore - ghosts of Viking London.

An Old English Martyrology (1900) Re-edited from Manuscripts in the Libraries of the British Museum and of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

An Old English Martyrology (1900) Re-edited from Manuscripts in the Libraries of the British Museum and of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

Author: George Herzfeld Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2020

First published in 1900, this Reader uses four manuscripts from the British Museum and Corpus Christi College Cambridge to present a thorough introduction along with a dual-language edition of the text. The original manuscripts, as Herzfeld demonstrates, are of varying qualities and comprise of the Anglian, West Saxon, Kentish and Mercian dialects. The re-edited text is presented alongside historical remarks, criticism of the manuscript, the text's ultimate date and place of origin and an exploration of its potential sources.

Urbanization in Viking Age and Medieval Denmark From Landing Place to Town

Urbanization in Viking Age and Medieval Denmark From Landing Place to Town

Author: Maria Corsi Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/05/2020

Medieval Denmark, Urbanization, Viking Towns, Emporia

Death and Afterlife in the Pages of Gregory of Tours Religion and Society in Late Antique Gaul

Death and Afterlife in the Pages of Gregory of Tours Religion and Society in Late Antique Gaul

Author: Allen Jones Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/05/2020

Gregory of Tours, Gaul, History, Death, Afterlife

The Awakening A History of the Western Mind AD 500 - AD 1700

The Awakening A History of the Western Mind AD 500 - AD 1700

Author: Charles Freeman Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2020

A monumental and exhilarating history of European thought, from the fall of Rome in the fifth century AD to the Scientific Revolution thirteen centuries later. The Awakening traces the recovery and refashioning of Europe's classical heritage from the ruins of the Roman Empire. The process of preservation of surviving texts, fragile at first, was strengthened under the Christian empire founded by Charlemagne in the eighth century; later, during the High Middle Ages, universities were founded and the study of philosophy was revived. Renewed interest in ancient Greek and Roman thought provided the intellectual impetus for the Renaissance of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, whose ideas - aesthetic, political and scientific - were disseminated across Europe by the invention of the printing press. Equally momentous was Europe's encounter with the New World, and the resulting maritime supremacy which conferred global reach on Europe's merchants and colonists. Vivid in detail and informed by the latest scholarship, The Awakening is powered not by the fate of kings or the clash of arms but by deeper currents of thought, inquiry and discovery, which first recover and then surpass the achievements of classical antiquity, and lead the West to the threshold of the Age of Reason. Charles Freeman takes the reader on an enthralling journey, and provides us with a vital key to understanding the world we live in today.

Llanilltud - The Story of a Celtic Christian Community

Llanilltud - The Story of a Celtic Christian Community

Author: Philip Morris Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/04/2020

The Most Noble of People Religious, Ethnic, and Gender Identity in Muslim Spain

The Most Noble of People Religious, Ethnic, and Gender Identity in Muslim Spain

Author: Jessica Coope Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/04/2020

The Most Noble of People presents a nuanced look at questions of identity in Muslim Spain under the Umayyads, an Arab dynasty that ruled from 756 to 1031. With a social historical emphasis on relations among different religious and ethnic groups, and between men and women, Jessica A. Coope considers the ways in which personal and cultural identity in al-Andalus could be alternately fluid and contentious. The opening chapters define Arab and Muslim identity as those categories were understood in Muslim Spain, highlighting the unique aspects of this society as well as its similarities with other parts of the medieval Islamic world. The book goes on to discuss what it meant to be a Jew or Christian in Spain under Islamic rule, and the degree to which non-Muslims were full participants in society. Following this is a consideration of gender identity as defined by Islamic law and by less normative sources like literature and mystical texts. The book concludes by focusing on internal rebellions against the government of Muslim Spain, particularly the conflicts between Muslims who were ethnically Arab and those who were Berber or native Iberian, which point to the limits of Muslim solidarity. Drawn from an unusually broad array of sources-including legal texts, religious polemic, chronicles, mystical texts, prose literature, and poetry, in both Arabic and Latin-many of Coope's illustrations of life in al-Andalus also reflect something of the larger medieval world. Further, some key questions about gender, ethnicity, and religious identity that concerned people in Muslim Spain-for example, women's status under Islamic law, or what it means to be a Muslim in different contexts and societies around the world-remain relevant today.

Rulers and Realms in Medieval Iberia, 711-1492

Rulers and Realms in Medieval Iberia, 711-1492

Author: Timothy M. Flood Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/04/2020

The Muslim conquest of Iberia in 711 unleashed a struggle for political control of the peninsula that endured for nearly eight centuries. The invaders' military strength immediately dominated the entire peninsula, but their political administration was less complete. Opposition to Muslim authority appeared just seven years later when a small band of Christian rebels in the northern mountains of Asturias established their own ruling class. These opposing forces would compete for political control until the Catholic Monarchs, Fernando and Isabel, established their supremacy in 1492. In this study, the author introduces the general reader to the rulers who exercised authority over the peninsula during a very complex and sometimes confusing period. He guides the reader through the chronology of the rulers' ascendance, deposition, or demise as he narrates their contest for territorial exchange. This story synthesizes the latest work from the best of scholars and is supplemented by lists of rulers, nine maps, and twenty genealogical charts. The ambitious yet concise approach delivers a coherent, chronological narrative over a period of eight centuries.

Renaissance & Early Modern Era (1308-1600)

Renaissance & Early Modern Era (1308-1600)

Author: Salem Press Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/04/2020

Defining Documents in World History: Renaissance & Early Modern Era explores vital documents from important world figures from the 15th and 16th centuries, including Thomas Aquinas, Giovanni Boccaccio, Marco Polo, and many more. This new addition to the Defining Documents series offers in-depth analysis of a broad range of historical documents and historic events that shaped these documents and the authors behind them. This text closely studies more than forty primary source documents to deliver a thorough examination of various peoples and events throughout history. Renaissance & Early Modern Era provides detailed, thought-provoking analysis of: Thomas Aquinas: Summa Theologiae Leon Alberti: On Painting Giovanni Boccaccio: The Decameron Ibn Battuta: Travels in Asia and Africa Marco Polo: Description of Hangzhou . Articles begin by introducing readers to the historical context surrounding the document, followed by a description of the author's life and circumstances in which the document was written. Next, a detailed analysis of the document provides an in-depth examination of the issues surrounding the document and its historical significance. An historical timeline and bibliography of supplemental readings will suport readers in understanding the broader historical events and subjects in the period.