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Australasian & Pacific history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Australasian & Pacific history category. Presented with a red border are the Australasian & Pacific history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Australasian & Pacific history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

La Nina and the Making of Climate Optimism Remembering Rain

La Nina and the Making of Climate Optimism Remembering Rain

Author: Julia Miller Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/08/2019

This book examines the deep connection Australians have with their climate to understand contemporary views on human-induced climate change. It is the first study of the Australian relationship with La Nina and it explains how fundamental this relationship is to the climate change debate both locally and globally. While unease with the Australian environment was a hallmark of early settler relations with a new continent, this book argues that the climate itself quickly became a source of hope and linked to progress. Once observed, weather patterns coalesced into recognizable cycles of wet and dry years and Australians adopted a belief in the certainty of good seasons. It was this optimistic response to climate linked to La Nina that laid the groundwork for this relationship with the Australian environment. This book will appeal to scholars and students of the environmental humanities, history and science as well as anyone concerned about climate change.

Australians in Shanghai Race, Rights and Nation in Treaty Port China

Australians in Shanghai Race, Rights and Nation in Treaty Port China

Author: Sophie (The University of Sydney, Australia) Loy-Wilson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2019

In the first half of the twentieth century, a diverse community of Australians settled in Shanghai. There they forged a `China trade', circulating goods, people and ideas across the South China Sea, from Shanghai and Hong Kong to Sydney and Melbourne. This trade has been largely forgotten in contemporary Australia, where future economic ties trump historical memory when it comes to popular perceptions of China. After the First World War, Australians turned to Chinese treaty ports, fleeing poverty and unemployment, while others sought to `save' China through missionary work and socialist ideas. Chinese Australians, disillusioned by Australian racism under the White Australia Policy, arrived to participate in Chinese nation building and ended up forging business empires which survive to this day. This book follows the life trajectories of these Australians, providing a means by which we can address one of the pervading tensions of race, empire and nation in the twentieth century: the relationship between working-class aspirations for social mobility and the exclusionary and discriminatory practices of white settler societies.

Island Base Ascension in the Falklands War

Island Base Ascension in the Falklands War

Author: Bob McQueen Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2019

An important piece in the jigsaw of the history of the Falklands War The previously untold story of how Ascension Island was crucial to the success of British operations during the Falklands War. The book spans the length of the Falklands War and tells how a facility consisting of next to nothing was turned into the advanced logistic base for one of the most daring and successful displays of military force at long range in the reclamation of British interests. From an island which was largely devoid of all resources, the story of how Ascension Island became the Forward Operating Base, doubled its population in a few weeks and briefly became the busiest airfield in the world - 350 takeoff and landings in one day - makes fascinating reading. Air-to-air refuelling proved itself to be a vital force extender throughout Operation Corporate since reconnaissance aircraft had insufficient fuel to return to base. The author, Commander of British Forces Support Unit, has collected together the accounts of several of the main participants including the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, the Royal Air Force, the Royal Engineers and also the American Airfield Commander where the willing co-operation of the United States is underlined. These include the Royal Navy Regulators, the RN Provost Detachment, the Amphibious Task Group detailing the various logistic problems and how these were overcome. A civilian viewpoint on the impact of such a huge influx of military personnel on the native and civilian population is given by the head of the resident BBC staff and other St. Helenian residents. Island Base provides an authoritative overview of this recent conflict which will be of wide appeal. Much has been written about the war, but very little about the island base, Ascension Island, which was crucial to our success. This book explains how the island was an essential stepping stone in the execution of a daring plan in response to Argentinian aggression...Lack of facilities required much improvisation...which was accomplished with commendable dedication and good humour by our armed forces.

The Knowledge Solution History: What place does history have in a post-truth world?

The Knowledge Solution History: What place does history have in a post-truth world?

Author: Anna Clark Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/07/2019

Does history provide us with cautionary tales or does it highlight the contested nature of our understanding of the past? Colonisation, nationalism, racism. Fighting on foreign shores, violence on our own country. Workers' rights, land booms, cultural wars. What can we learn from these reoccurring events across the recent history of this nation? In The Knowledge Solution: Australian History, the country's most compelling writers and historians give insight into the challenging and diverse perspectives of Australia's past, and illuminate how we may better step into the future. Contributors include: David Unaipon; Michael Cannon; Stuart Macintyre; Rebe Taylor; Mark McKenna; Rebecca Perkins; Marcia Langton; Peter Sutton; Jo Wainer; James Curran; Stuart Ward; Ellen Warn; Michele Grossman; John Rickard; Peter Spearritt; Helen MacDonald; Janet McCalman; Mark Davis; Richard Evans; Edward Duyker; Ray Parkin; Geoffrey Blainey; Peter Cochrane; Raffaello Carboni; Bain Attwood; Manning Clark.

Working with the Ancestors Mana and Place in the Marquesas Islands

Working with the Ancestors Mana and Place in the Marquesas Islands

Author: Emily C. Donaldson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/07/2019

Throughout the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia, forest spirits share space with ancestral ruins and active agricultural plots, affecting land use and heritage preservation. As their efforts to establish UNESCO World Heritage status continue, Marquesans grapple with questions about when sites should be preserved intact, when neglect is an appropriate option, and when deterioration resulting from local livelihoods should be accepted. In Working with the Ancestors Emily Donaldson considers how Marquesan perceptions of heritage and mana, or sacred power, have influenced the use of land in the islands and how both cultural and environmental sustainability can be achieved. The Marquesas' relative geographical isolation and ecological richness are the backdrop for the confluence of international heritage preservation and sustainability efforts that affect both resources and Indigenous peoples. Donaldson demonstrates how anthropological concepts of embodiment, alienation, place, and power can inform global resource management, offering a new approach that integrates analyses of policy, practice, and heritage.

Working with the Ancestors Mana and Place in the Marquesas Islands

Working with the Ancestors Mana and Place in the Marquesas Islands

Author: Emily C. Donaldson Format: Hardback Release Date: 11/07/2019

Throughout the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia, forest spirits share space with ancestral ruins and active agricultural plots, affecting land use and heritage preservation. As their efforts to establish UNESCO World Heritage status continue, Marquesans grapple with questions about when sites should be preserved intact, when neglect is an appropriate option, and when deterioration resulting from local livelihoods should be accepted. In Working with the Ancestors Emily Donaldson considers how Marquesan perceptions of heritage and mana, or sacred power, have influenced the use of land in the islands and how both cultural and environmental sustainability can be achieved. The Marquesas' relative geographical isolation and ecological richness are the backdrop for the confluence of international heritage preservation and sustainability efforts that affect both resources and Indigenous peoples. Donaldson demonstrates how anthropological concepts of embodiment, alienation, place, and power can inform global resource management, offering a new approach that integrates analyses of policy, practice, and heritage.

Scots in New Zealand

Scots in New Zealand

Author: Marjorie Harper Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2019

A look at the Scots and their ties to New Zealand

A Power in the World The Hawaiian Kingdom in Oceania

A Power in the World The Hawaiian Kingdom in Oceania

Author: Lorenz Gonschor Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/06/2019

Few people today know that in the nineteenth century, Hawai`i was not only an internationally recognized independent nation but played a crucial role in the entire Pacific region and left an important legacy throughout Oceania. As the first non-Western state to gain full recognition as a coequal of the Western powers, yet at the same time grounded in indigenous tradition and identity, the Hawaiian Kingdom occupied a unique position in the late nineteenth-century world order. From this position, Hawai`i's leaders were able to promote the building of independent states based on their country's model throughout the Pacific, envisioning the region to become politically unified. Such a pan-Oceanian polity would be able to withstand foreign colonialism and become, in the words of one of the idea's pioneers, a Power in the World. After being developed over three decades among both native and non-native intellectuals close to the Hawaiian court, King Kal?kaua's government started implementing this vision in 1887 by concluding a treaty of confederation with S?moa, a first step toward a larger Hawaiian-led pan-Oceanian federation. Political unrest and Western imperialist interference in both Hawai`i and S?moa prevented the project from advancing further at the time, and a long interlude of colonialism and occupation has obscured its legacy for over a century. Nonetheless it remains an inspiring historical precedent for movements toward greater political and economic integration in the Pacific Islands region today. Lorenz Gonschor examines two intertwined historical processes: The development of a Hawai`i-based pan-Oceanian policy and underlying ideology, which in turn provided the rationale for the second process, the spread of the Hawaiian Kingdom's constitutional model to other Pacific archipelagos. He argues that the legacy of this visionary policy is today re-emerging in the form of two interconnected movements?namely a growing movement in Hawai`i to reclaim its legacy as Oceania's historically leading nation-state on one hand, and an increasingly assertive Oceanian regionalism emanating mainly from Fiji and other postcolonial states in the Southwestern Pacific on the other. As a historical reference for both, nineteenth-century Hawaiian policy serves as an inspiration and guideline for envisioning de-colonial futures for the Pacific region.

Bedlam at Botany Bay

Bedlam at Botany Bay

Author: Dr James Dunk Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2019

What happened when people went mad in the fledgling colony of New South Wales? In this important new history of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, we find out through the correspondence of tireless colonial secretaries, the brazen language of lawyers and judges and firebrand politicians, and heartbreaking letters from siblings, parents and friends. We also hear from the mad themselves. Class, gender and race became irrelevant as illness, chaos and delusion afflicted convicts exiled from their homes and living under the weight of imperial justice; ex-convicts and small settlers as they grappled with the country they had taken from its Indigenous inhabitants, as well as officers, officials and wealthy colonists who sought to guide the course of European history in Australia. This not a history of the miserable institutions built for the mentally ill, or those living within them, or the people in charge of the asylums. These stories of madness are woven together into a narrative about freedom and possibilities, and collapse and unravelling. The book looks at people at the edge of the world finding themselves at the edge of sanity, and is about their strategies for survival. This is a new story of colonial Australia, cast as neither a grim and fatal shore nor an antipodean paradise, but a place where the full range of humanity wrestled with the challenges of colonisation. The first book-length history of madness at the beginning ofEuropean Australia Original and evocative, it grapples seriously with the place ofmadness in Australia's convict history The book's intimate descriptions of madness and the response to itgive a unique picture of life in the early colony through the lens ofmental illness Awareness of mental health continues to rise globally. This bookexplores efforts to understand and to treat madness before asylums,hospitals and doctors made madness a medical problem. Meticulously researched by James Dunk, a young emerginghistorian of medicine and colonialism

The People of the Sea Environment, Identity, and History in Oceania

The People of the Sea Environment, Identity, and History in Oceania

Author: Paul D'Arcy Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 14/06/2019

Oceania is characterized by thousands of islands and archipelagoes amidst the vast expanse of the Pacific. Although it is one of the few truly oceanic habitats occupied permanently by humankind, surprisingly little research has been done on the maritime dimension of Pacific history. The People of the Sea attempts to fill this gap by combining neglected historical and scientific material to provide the first synthetic study of ocean-people interaction in the region from 1770 to 1870.

Mr Ambassador Memoirs of Sir Carl Berendsen

Mr Ambassador Memoirs of Sir Carl Berendsen

Author: Hugh Templeton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/06/2019

A collection of memoirs that include first-hand reports of the administration of New Zealand's foreign policy in the first half of the 20th century and captivating commentary on a multitude of prominent political figures, Sir Carl Berendsen's journals chronicle the life of the father of New Zealand foreign affairs. As the head of the department of external affairs, high commissioner to Australia, and then ambassador to Washington, he was involved in such major events as the ANZAC pact, preparations for World War II, the formation of the United Nations, and the Japanese Peace Treaty. This compilation underscores the dynamic thinking and gifted writing of a man who has influenced his country in a way that only a small few can match.