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History of the Americas

See below for a selection of the latest books from History of the Americas category. Presented with a red border are the History of the Americas books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great History of the Americas books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Wild West: History, Myth & The Making of America History, Myth & The Making of America

The Wild West: History, Myth & The Making of America History, Myth & The Making of America

Author: Frederick Nolan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/09/2019

On 14 May 1804, the personal secretary President Thomas Jefferson, one Capt. Meriwether Lewis, and a companion, William Clark, led a thirty-three-man expedition to the new lands of Louisiana, purchased from Napoleon the previous year. 8,000 miles (13,000 km) and two years later, after rafting up the Missouri and crossing the Rocky Mountains, they reached the far side of the world, the Pacific Ocean. Almost in the footsteps of Lewis and Clark followed a hardy breed who ventured fearlessly into the unexplored wilderness, blazing trails that within a few short decades would be filled with first a trickle, then a multitude of emigrants heading west in search of new lands and new lives... The Wild West is the story of the men and women who answered the call of the West.

Alaska in the Progressive Age A Political History, 1896-1916

Alaska in the Progressive Age A Political History, 1896-1916

Author: Thomas Alton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/09/2019

The growth of modern-day Alaska began with the Klondike gold discovery in 1896. Over the course of the next two decades, as prospectors, pioneers, and settlers rushed in, Alaska developed its agricultural and mineral resources, birthed a structure of highway and railroad transportation, and founded the Alaska cities we know today. All this activity occurred alongside the Progressive Age in American politics. It was a time of widespread reform, as Progressive politicians took on the powerful business trusts and enacted sweeping reforms to protect workers and consumers. Alaska in the Progressive Age looks at how this national movement affected the Alaska territory. Though the reigning view is that Alaska was neglected and even abused by the federal government, Alton argues that from 1896 to 1916 the territory benefitted richly in the age of Progressive Democracy. As the population of Alaska grew, Congress responded to the needs of the nation's northern possession, giving the territory a delegate to Congress, a locally elected legislature, and ultimately in 1914, the federally funded Alaska Railroad. Much has been written about the development of modern-day Alaska, especially in terms of the Gold Rush and the origins of the Alaska Railroad. But this is the first history to put this era in the context of Progressive Age American politics. This unexplored look at how Progressivism reached the furthest corners of the United States is an especially timely book as the Progressive Movement shows signs of affecting Alaska again.

To Begin the World Over Again How the American Revolution Devastated the Globe

To Begin the World Over Again How the American Revolution Devastated the Globe

Author: Matthew Lockwood Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/09/2019

The first exploration of the profound and often catastrophic impact the American Revolution had on the rest of the world While the American Revolution led to domestic peace and liberty, it ultimately had a catastrophic global impact-it strengthened the British Empire and led to widespread persecution and duress. From the opium wars in China to anti-imperial rebellions in Peru to the colonization of Australia-the inspirational impact the American success had on fringe uprisings was outweighed by the influence it had on the tightening fists of oppressive world powers. Here Matthew Lockwood presents, in vivid detail, the neglected story of this unintended revolution. It sowed the seeds of collapse for the preeminent empires of the early modern era, setting the stage for the global domination of Britain, Russia, and the United States. Lockwood illuminates the forgotten stories and experiences of the communities and individuals who adapted to this new world in which the global balance of power had been drastically altered.

Money, Power, and the People The American Struggle to Make Banking Democratic

Money, Power, and the People The American Struggle to Make Banking Democratic

Author: Christopher W Shaw Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

Banks and bankers are hardly the most beloved people and institutions in this country. With its corruptive influence on politics and stranglehold on the American economy, Wall Street is not held in high regard by many outside the financial sector. But the pitchforks raised against this behemoth are largely rhetorical: we rarely see riots in the streets or public demands for an equitable and democratic banking system that result in serious national changes. Yet the situation was vastly different a century ago, as Christopher W. Shaw shows in Money, Power, and the People. His book upends the conventional thinking that financial policy in the early twentieth century was set primarily by the needs and demands of bankers. Shaw shows that banking and politics were directly shaped by the literal and symbolic investments of the grassroots. This engagement remade financial institutions and the national economy, through populist pressure and the establishment of federal regulatory programs and agencies like the Farm Credit System and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Shaw reveals the surprising groundswell behind such seemingly arcane legislation as the Emergency Currency Act of 1908, as well as the power of the people to demand serious political repercussions for the banks that caused the Great Depression. One result of this sustained interest and pressure was legislation and regulation that brought on a long period of relative financial stability, with a reduced frequency of economic booms and busts. Ironically, though, this stability led to the current decline of the very banking politics that enabled it. Giving voice to a broad swath of American figures, including workers, farmers, politicians, and bankers alike, Money, Power, and the People recasts our understanding of what might be possible in balancing the needs of the people with those of their financial institutions.

Citizen Brown Race, Democracy, and Inequality in the St. Louis Suburbs

Citizen Brown Race, Democracy, and Inequality in the St. Louis Suburbs

Author: Colin Gordon Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

The 2014 death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, ignited nationwide protests and brought widespread attention to tragically relevant issues like police brutality and institutional racism. But Ferguson is not alone. As Colin Gordon shows in this urgent and timely book, the events in Ferguson exposed not only the deep racism of the local police department, but the ways in which decades of public policy effectively segregated and curtailed citizenship across the St. Louis suburbs... Citizen Brown uncovers half a century of private practices and public policies that resulted in bitter inequality and sustained segregation in Ferguson and beyond. Gordon shows how municipal and school district boundaries were pointedly drawn to contain or exclude African Americans, how local policies and services--especially policing, education, and urban renewal--were weaponized to maintain civic separation. He also makes clear that the outcry that arose in Ferguson was no impulsive outburst, but an explosion of pent-up rage against longstanding local systems of segregation and inequality--of which a police force which viewed citizens not as subjects to serve and protect, but as sources of revenue, was just the most immediate example. Worse, Citizen Brown illustrates the fact that, though the greater St. Louis area provides some extraordinarily clear examples of fraught racial dynamics, it is hardly alone among American cities and regions.

E Pluribus Unum How the Common Law Helped Unify and Liberate Colonial America, 1607-1776

E Pluribus Unum How the Common Law Helped Unify and Liberate Colonial America, 1607-1776

Author: William E. (Professor of Law, New York University) Nelson Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

The colonies that comprised pre-revolutionary America had thirteen legal systems and governments. Given their diversity, how did they evolve into a single nation? In E Pluribus Unum, the eminent legal historian William E. Nelson explains how this diverse array of legal orders gradually converged over time, laying the groundwork for the founding of the United States. From their inception, the colonies exercised a range of approaches to the law. For instance, while New England based its legal system around the word of God, Maryland followed the common law tradition, and New York adhered to Dutch law. Over time, though, the British crown standardized legal procedure in an effort to more uniformly and efficiently exert control over the Empire. But, while the common law emerged as the dominant system across the colonies, its effects were far from what English rulers had envisioned. E Pluribus Unum highlights the political context in which the common law developed and how it influenced the United States Constitution. In practice, the triumph of the common law over competing approaches gave lawyers more authority than governing officials. By the end of the eighteenth century, many colonial legal professionals began to espouse constitutional ideology that would mature into the doctrine of judicial review. In turn, laypeople came to accept constitutional doctrine by the time of independence in 1776. Ultimately, Nelson shows that the colonies' gradual embrace of the common law was instrumental to the establishment of the United States. Not simply a masterful legal history of colonial America, Nelson's magnum opus fundamentally reshapes our understanding of the sources of both the American Revolution and the Founding.

Annals of Native America How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive

Annals of Native America How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive

Author: Camilla (Professor of History, Rutgers University) Townsend Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/09/2019

For many generations, the Nahuas of Mexico maintained their tradition of the xiuhpohualli. or year counts, telling and performing their history around communal firesides so that the memory of it would not be lost. When the Spaniards came, young Nahuas took the Roman letters taught to them by the friars and used the new alphabet to record historical performances by elders. Between them, they wrote hundreds of pages, which circulated widely within their communities. Over the next century and a half, their descendants copied and recopied these texts, sometimes embellishing, sometimes extracting, and often expanding them chronologically. The annals, as they have usually been called, were written not only by Indians but also for Indians, without regard to European interests. As such they are rare and inordinately valuable texts. They have often been assumed to be both largely anonymous and at least partially inscrutable to modern ears. In this work, Nahuatl scholar Camilla Townsend reveals the authors of most of the texts, restores them to their proper contexts, and makes sense of long misunderstood documents. She follows a remarkable chain of Nahua historians, generation by generation, exploring who they were, what they wrote, and why they wrote it. Sometimes they conceived of their work as a political act, reinstating bonds between communities, or between past, present, and future generations. Sometimes they conceived of it largely as art and delighted in offering language that was beautiful or startling or humorous. Annals of Native America brings together, for the first time, samples of their many creations to offer a heretofore obscured history of the Nahuas and an alternate perspective on the Conquest and its aftermath.

Suffrage and the City New York Women Battle for the Ballot

Suffrage and the City New York Women Battle for the Ballot

Author: Lauren C. (Lecturer, Writing Program, Princeton University) Santangelo Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

In 1917, women won the vote in New York State. Suffrage and the City explores how activists in New York City were instrumental in achieving this milestone. Santangelo uncovers the ways in which the demand for women's rights intersected with the history, politics, and culture of New York City in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. The fight for the vote in the nation's largest metropolis demanded that suffragists both mobilize and contest urban etiquette, as they worked to gain visibility and underscore their cause's respectability. From the Polo Grounds to the Lower East Side, organizers championed political equality to anyone who would listen in the early twentieth century. Their Fifth Avenue parades showcased the various Manhattan subcultures, including industrial laborers, teachers, nurses, and even socialites, that they transformed into a broad coalition by the 1910s. Films and newspapers broadcasted their tactics to rest of the country, just as the national suffrage organization decided to draw on Gotham's resources by moving its own headquarters to midtown and thereby turning Manhattan into the movement's capital. The city's mores, rhythms, and physical layout helped to shape what was possible for organizers campaigning within it. At the same time, suffragists helped to redefine the urban experience for white, middle-class women. Combining urban studies, geography, and gender and political history, Suffrage and the City demonstrates that the Big Apple was more than just a stage for suffrage action; it was part of the drama. As much as enfranchisement was a political victory in New York State, it was also a uniquely urban and cultural one.

The Culture of Feedback Ecological Thinking in Seventies America

The Culture of Feedback Ecological Thinking in Seventies America

Author: Daniel Belgrad Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/09/2019

When we want advice, we often casually speak of reaching out to others to get some feedback. But how many of us give a thought to what this phrase actually means? The idea of feedback actually dates to World War II, when the term was developed to describe the dynamics of self-regulating systems, which correct their actions by feeding their effects back into the system. For example, antiaircraft weapons systems could learn to predict how planes might try to evade them and adjust their firing patterns accordingly. By the early 1970s, feedback had evolved to become the governing trope for a counterculture that was reoriented and reinvigorated by ecological thinking. The Culture of Feedback digs deep into a dazzling variety of left-of-center experiences and attitudes from this misunderstood period, bringing us a new look at the wild side of the 1970s. Belgrad shows us how ideas from systems theory were taken up by the counterculture and the environmental movement, eventually influencing a wide range of beliefs and behaviors, particularly related to the question of what is and is not intelligence. He tells the story of a generation of Americans who were struck by a newfound interest in--and respect for--plants, animals, indigenous populations, and the very sounds around them, knitting this together with cogent insights on environmentalism, feminism, systems theory, and psychedelics. The Culture of Feedback repaints the familiar image of the '70s as a time of Me Generation malaise to reveal an era of revolutionary and hopeful social currents, driven by desires to radically improve--and feed back into--the systems that had come before.

The Culture of Feedback Ecological Thinking in Seventies America

The Culture of Feedback Ecological Thinking in Seventies America

Author: Daniel Belgrad Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/09/2019

When we want advice, we often casually speak of reaching out to others to get some feedback. But how many of us give a thought to what this phrase actually means? The idea of feedback actually dates to World War II, when the term was developed to describe the dynamics of self-regulating systems, which correct their actions by feeding their effects back into the system. For example, antiaircraft weapons systems could learn to predict how planes might try to evade them and adjust their firing patterns accordingly. By the early 1970s, feedback had evolved to become the governing trope for a counterculture that was reoriented and reinvigorated by ecological thinking. The Culture of Feedback digs deep into a dazzling variety of left-of-center experiences and attitudes from this misunderstood period, bringing us a new look at the wild side of the 1970s. Belgrad shows us how ideas from systems theory were taken up by the counterculture and the environmental movement, eventually influencing a wide range of beliefs and behaviors, particularly related to the question of what is and is not intelligence. He tells the story of a generation of Americans who were struck by a newfound interest in--and respect for--plants, animals, indigenous populations, and the very sounds around them, knitting this together with cogent insights on environmentalism, feminism, systems theory, and psychedelics. The Culture of Feedback repaints the familiar image of the '70s as a time of Me Generation malaise to reveal an era of revolutionary and hopeful social currents, driven by desires to radically improve--and feed back into--the systems that had come before.

A Post-Exceptionalist Perspective on Early American History American Wests, Global Wests, and Indian Wars

A Post-Exceptionalist Perspective on Early American History American Wests, Global Wests, and Indian Wars

Author: Carroll P. Kakel III Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/09/2019

This book argues that early American history is best understood as the story of a settler-colonial supplanting society-a society intent on a vast land grab of American Indian space and driven by a logic of elimination and a genocidal imperative to rid the new white settler living space of its existing Indigenous inhabitants. Challenging the still strongly held notion of American history as somehow exceptional or unique, it locates the history of the United States and its colonial antecedents as a central part of-rather than an exception to-the emerging global histories of imperialism, colonialism, and genocide. It also explores early American history in an imperial, transnational, and global frame, showing how the precedent of the North American West and its colonial trope of Indian wars were used by like-minded American and European expansionists to inspire and legitimate other imperial-colonial adventures from the late-nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries.