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Asian history

See below for a selection of the latest books from Asian history category. Presented with a red border are the Asian history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Asian history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Korea

Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Korea

Author: James E. Hoare Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/12/2020

South Korea (Republic of Korea) is the more successful of the two Koreas in both economic and political terms. Even the Asian economic crisis of 1997-1998, which hit badly, was weathered successfully, and when the next crisis came along in 2007, South Korea coped better than many other countries. This economic strength, taken with the steady progress of democratization since 1987, indicates that when the peninsula is eventually reunified, as one day it probably will be, a new unified Korea will follow the South Korea model rather than that of North Korea This fourth edition of Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Korea contains a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 700 cross-referenced entries on important personalities as well as aspects of the country's politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the Republic of Korea.

Poisoning the Pacific

Poisoning the Pacific

Author: Jon Mitchell, John W. Dower Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/12/2020

For decades, US military operations have been contaminating the Pacific region with toxic substances, including plutonium, dioxin, and VX nerve agent. Hundreds of thousands of service members, their families, and residents have been exposed--but the United States has hidden the damage and refused to help victims. After World War II, the United States granted immunity to Japanese military scientists in exchange for their data on biological weapons tests conducted in China; in the following years, nuclear detonations in the Pacific obliterated entire islands and exposed Americans, Marshallese, Chamorros, and Japanese fishing crews to radioactive fallout. At the same time, the United States experimented with biological weapons on Okinawa and stockpiled the island with nuclear and chemical munitions, causing numerous accidents. Meanwhile, the CIA orchestrated a campaign to introduce nuclear power to Japan--the folly of which became horrifyingly clear in the 2011 meltdowns in Fukushima Prefecture. Caught in a geopolitical grey zone, US territories have been among the worst affected by military contamination, including Guam, Saipan, and Johnston Island, the final disposal site of apocalyptic volumes of chemical weapons and Agent Orange. Accompanying this damage, US authorities have waged a campaign of cover-ups, lies, and attacks on the media, which the author has experienced firsthand in the form of military surveillance and attempts by the State Department to impede his work. Now, for the first time, this explosive book reveals the horrific extent of contamination in the Pacific and the lengths the Pentagon will go to conceal it.

A Genealogy of Terrorism

A Genealogy of Terrorism

Author: Joseph (University of Toronto) McQuade Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

Using India as a case study, Joseph McQuade demonstrates how the modern concept of terrorism was shaped by colonial emergency laws dating back into the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Beginning with the 'thugs', 'pirates', and 'fanatics' of the nineteenth century, McQuade traces the emerging and novel legal category of 'the terrorist' in early twentieth-century colonial law, ending with an examination of the first international law to target global terrorism in the 1930s. Drawing on a wide range of archival research and a detailed empirical study of evolving emergency laws in British India, he argues that the idea of terrorism emerged as a deliberate strategy by officials seeking to depoliticize the actions of anti-colonial revolutionaries, and that many of the ideas embedded in this colonial legislation continue to shape contemporary understandings of terrorism today.

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World

Author: Lynn A. Struve Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2020

From the mid-sixteenth through the end of the seventeenth century, Chinese intellectuals attended more to dreams and dreaming-and in a wider array of genres-than in any other period of Chinese history. Taking the approach of cultural history, this ambitious yet accessible work aims both to describe the most salient aspects of this dream arc and to explain its trajectory in time through the writings, arts, and practices of well-known thinkers, religionists, litterateurs, memoirists, painters, doctors, and political figures of late Ming and early Qing times. The volume's encompassing thesis asserts that certain associations of dreaming, grounded in the neurophysiology of the human brain at sleep-such as subjectivity, irrationality, the unbidden, lack of control, emotionality, spontaneity, the imaginal, and memory-when especially heightened by historical and cultural developments, are likely to pique interest in dreaming and generate florescences of dream-expression among intellectuals. The work thus makes a contribution to the history of how people have understood human consciousness in various times and cultures. The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World is the most substantial work in any language on the historicity of Chinese dream culture. Within Chinese studies, it will appeal to those with backgrounds in literature, religion, philosophy, political history, and the visual arts. It will also be welcomed by readers interested in comparative dream cultures, the history of consciousness, and neurohistory.

Shadows Across The Golden Land: Myanmar's Opening, Foreign Influence And Investment

Shadows Across The Golden Land: Myanmar's Opening, Foreign Influence And Investment

What are the political and economic challenges facing Myanmar as it opens to the world? And what are the opportunities and responsibilities for the international community to influence and also invest in the country?This book aims to provide readers with an assessment that integrates analysis with on-the-ground experience and insights, drawn from closely engaging with Myanmar since the country began to move toward democracy and open to the world. In order for readers to appreciate emerging trends and developments, the book evaluates the efforts of the recent Thein Sein administration and current National League of Democracy government up to the present day. It also identifies key events from the colonial period through to the decades when the country was under military rule, cut off from much of the international community. The on-going crisis in Myanmar's Rakhine State and the controversial situation of the Rohingya are examined at length, with an effort to contextualize these events in wider challenges of geo-politics and national reforms to rehabilitate the government and the economy.The book presents readers with a clear view of how the country might progress beyond current obstacles, and highlights the opportunities that remain for those willing to engage constructively for the longer term in the opening of this frontier economy and once-pariah state. As Myanmar moves ahead with its transition to democracy and with economic development, this book is recommended for both those who watch the country with interest and those who consider the ways in which the international community interacts with the region and Myanmar.

Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society China 2019 (Vol. 79, No.1)

Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society China 2019 (Vol. 79, No.1)

Author: Royal Asiatic Society China Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/11/2020

The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, China Branch, 2019 edition. Featuring articles and research on a wide range of topics related to China's modern history and society.

The Loss of Hindustan

The Loss of Hindustan

Author: Manan Ahmed Asif Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/11/2020

A field-changing history explains how the subcontinent lost its political identity as the home of all religions and emerged as India, the land of the Hindus. Did South Asia have a shared regional identity prior to the arrival of Europeans in the late fifteenth century? This is a subject of heated debate in scholarly circles and contemporary political discourse. Manan Ahmed Asif argues that Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Republic of India share a common political ancestry: they are all part of a region whose people understand themselves as Hindustani. Asif describes the idea of Hindustan, as reflected in the work of native historians from roughly 1000 CE to 1900 CE, and how that idea went missing. This makes for a radical interpretation of how India came to its contemporary political identity. Asif argues that a European understanding of India as Hindu has replaced an earlier, native understanding of India as Hindustan, a home for all faiths. Turning to the subcontinent's medieval past, Asif uncovers a rich network of historians of Hindustan who imagined, studied, and shaped their kings, cities, and societies. Asif closely examines the most complete idea of Hindustan, elaborated by the early seventeenth century Deccan historian Firishta. His monumental work, Tarikh-i Firishta, became a major source for European philosophers and historians, such as Voltaire, Kant, Hegel, and Gibbon during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Yet Firishta's notions of Hindustan were lost and replaced by a different idea of India that we inhabit today. The Loss of Hindustan reveals the intellectual pathways that dispensed with multicultural Hindustan and created a religiously partitioned world of today.

A Third Way

A Third Way

Author: Lawrence C. Reardon Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/11/2020

From 1949 to 1978, communist elites held clashing visions of China's economic development. Mao Zedong advocated the first way of semi-autarchy characteristic of revolutionary Stalinism (1929-34), while Zhou Enlai adapted bureaucratic Stalinism (1934-53) to promote the second way of import substitution industrialization. A Third Way tells the story of Deng Xiaoping's experimentation with export-led development inspired by Lenin's New Economic Policy and the economic reforms of Eastern Europe and Asia. Having uncovered an extraordinary collection of internal party and government documents, Lawrence Reardon meticulously traces the evolution of the coastal development strategy, starting with special economic zones in 1979 and evolving into the fourteen open coastal cities, the Hainan SEZ, and eventual accession to the global trade regime in 2001. Reardon details how Deng and Zhao Ziyang tackled large-scale smuggling operations, compromised with Chen Yun's conservative views, and overcame Deng Liqun's ideological opposition. Although Zhao Ziyang was airbrushed out of official Chinese history after June 4, 1989, Reardon argues that Zhao was the true architect of China's opening strategy. A Third Way provides important new insights about the crucial period of the 1980s and how it paved the way for China's transformation into a global economic superpower.

The Chinese Dreamscape, 300 BCE-800 CE

The Chinese Dreamscape, 300 BCE-800 CE

Author: Robert Ford Campany Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/11/2020

Dreaming is a near-universal human experience, but there is no consensus on why we dream or what dreams should be taken to mean. In this book, Robert Ford Campany investigates what people in late classical and early medieval China thought of dreams. He maps a common dreamscape-an array of ideas about what dreams are and what responses they should provoke-that underlies texts of diverse persuasions and genres over several centuries. These writings include manuals of dream interpretation, scriptural instructions, essays, treatises, poems, recovered manuscripts, histories, and anecdotes of successful dream-based predictions. In these many sources, we find culturally distinctive answers to questions peoples the world over have asked for millennia: What happens when we dream? Do dreams foretell future events? If so, how might their imagistic code be unlocked to yield predictions? Could dreams enable direct communication between the living and the dead, or between humans and nonhuman animals? The Chinese Dreamscape, 300 BCE-800 CE sheds light on how people in a distant age negotiated these mysteries and brings Chinese notions of dreaming into conversation with studies of dreams in other cultures, ancient and contemporary. Taking stock of how Chinese people wrestled with-and celebrated-the strangeness of dreams, Campany asks us to reflect on how we might reconsider our own notions of dreaming.

The Chinese Dreamscape, 300 BCE-800 CE

The Chinese Dreamscape, 300 BCE-800 CE

Author: Robert Ford Campany Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/11/2020

Dreaming is a near-universal human experience, but there is no consensus on why we dream or what dreams should be taken to mean. In this book, Robert Ford Campany investigates what people in late classical and early medieval China thought of dreams. He maps a common dreamscape-an array of ideas about what dreams are and what responses they should provoke-that underlies texts of diverse persuasions and genres over several centuries. These writings include manuals of dream interpretation, scriptural instructions, essays, treatises, poems, recovered manuscripts, histories, and anecdotes of successful dream-based predictions. In these many sources, we find culturally distinctive answers to questions peoples the world over have asked for millennia: What happens when we dream? Do dreams foretell future events? If so, how might their imagistic code be unlocked to yield predictions? Could dreams enable direct communication between the living and the dead, or between humans and nonhuman animals? The Chinese Dreamscape, 300 BCE-800 CE sheds light on how people in a distant age negotiated these mysteries and brings Chinese notions of dreaming into conversation with studies of dreams in other cultures, ancient and contemporary. Taking stock of how Chinese people wrestled with-and celebrated-the strangeness of dreams, Campany asks us to reflect on how we might reconsider our own notions of dreaming.

British Engagement with Japan, 1854-1922

British Engagement with Japan, 1854-1922

Author: Antony Best Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/11/2020

This book by a leading authority on Anglo-Japanese relations reconsiders the circumstances which led to the unlikely alliance of 1902 to 1922 between Britain, the leading world power of the day and Japan, an Asian, non-European nation which had only recently emerged from self-imposed isolation. Based on extensive original research the book goes beyond existing accounts which concentrate on high politics, strategy and simple assertions about the two countries' similarities as island empires. It brings into the picture cultural factors, particularly the ways in which Japan was portrayed in Britain, and ambivalent British attitudes to race and supposed European superiority which were overcome but remained difficulties. It charts how the relationship developed as events unfolded, including Japan's wars against China and Russia, and in addition looks at royal diplomacy, where the Japanese Court came eventually to be treated as a respected equal. Overall, the book provides a major reassessment of this important subject.

Noncooperation in India

Noncooperation in India

Author: David Hardiman Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/11/2020

The Noncooperation Movement of 1920-22, led by Mahatma Gandhi, challenged every aspect of British rule in India. It was supported by people from all levels of the social hierarchy and united Hindus and Muslims in a way never again achieved by Indian nationalists. It was remarkably nonviolent. In all, it was one of the major mass protests of modern times. Yet there are almost no accounts of the entire movement, although many aspects of it have been covered by local-level studies. This volume both brings together and builds on these studies, looking at fractious all-India debates over strategy; the major grievances that drove local-level campaigns; the ways leaders braided together these streams of protest within a nationalist agenda; and the distinctive features of popular nonviolence for a righteous cause. David Hardiman's previous volume, The Nonviolent Struggle for Indian Freedom, examined the history of nonviolent resistance in the Indian nationalist movement. The present volume takes his study forward to examine the culmination of this first surge of struggle. While the campaign of 1920-22 did not achieve its desired objective of immediate self-rule, it did succeed in shaking to the core the authority of the British in India.