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European history

See below for a selection of the latest books from European history category. Presented with a red border are the European history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great European history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Networks of Modernity

Networks of Modernity

This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. It is free to read at Oxford Scholarship Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. Networks of Modernity: Germany in the Age of the Telegraph, 1830-1880 offers a fresh perspective on the history of Germany by investigating the origins and impact of the 'communications revolution' that transformed state and society during the nineteenth century. It focuses upon the period 1830-1880, exploring the interactions between the many different actors who developed, administered, and used one of the most important technologies of the period-the electric telegraph. It reveals the channels through which scientific and technical knowledge circulated across Central Europe during the 1830s and 1840s, stimulating both collaboration and confrontation between the scientists, technicians, businessmen, and bureaucrats involved in bringing the telegraph to life. It highlights the technology's impact upon the conduct of trade, finance, news distribution, and government in the tumultuous decades that witnessed the 1848 revolutions, the wars of unification, and the establishment of the Kaiserreich in 1871. Following the telegraph lines themselves, it weaves together the changes which took place at a local, regional, national, and eventually global level, revisiting the technology's impact upon concepts of space and time, and highlighting the importance of this period in laying the foundations for Germany's experience of a profoundly ambiguous, networked modernity.

Aftermath

Aftermath

Author: Harald Jahner Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/05/2021

How does a nation recover from fascism? 1945 to 1955 was a raw, wild decade poised between two eras that proved decisive for Germany's future - and one starkly different to how most of us imagine it today. Post-war Germany found itself occupied over four zones by the victorious Allied forces. More than half its population was displaced, 10 million newly released forced labourers and several million prisoners of war returned to an uncertain existence in a country that found itself politically, economically and morally bankrupt. Aftermath is the first history of Germany's national mentality in the immediate post-war years. Using major global political developments as a backdrop, Harald J hner weaves a series of life stories into a nuanced panorama of a nation undergoing monumental change. Accompanied by expertly selected black and white photographs - some beautiful, some revelatory, some shocking - Aftermath evokes an immersive portrait of a society corrupted, demoralized and freed - all at the same time.

The Shortest History of Greece

The Shortest History of Greece

Author: James Heneage Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/05/2021

Mussolini's War

Mussolini's War

Author: John Gooch Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/05/2021

'It is hard to imagine a finer account, both of the sweep of Italy's wars, and of the characters caught up in them' Caroline Moorhead, The Guardian From an acclaimed military historian, the definitive account of Italy's experience of the Second World War While staying closely aligned with Hitler, Mussolini remained carefully neutral until the summer of 1940. Then, with the wholly unexpected and sudden collapse of the French and British armies, Mussolini declared war on the Allies in the hope of making territorial gains in southern France and Africa. This decision proved a horrifying miscalculation, dooming Italy to its own prolonged and unwinnable war, immense casualties and an Allied invasion in 1943 which ushered in a terrible new era for the country. John Gooch's new book is the definitive account of Italy's war experience. Beginning with the invasion of Abyssinia and ending with Mussolini's arrest, Gooch brilliantly portrays the nightmare of a country with too small an industrial sector, too incompetent a leadership and too many fronts on which to fight. Everywhere - whether in the USSR, the Western Desert or the Balkans - Italian troops found themselves against either better-equipped or more motivated enemies. The result was a war entirely at odds with the dreams of pre-war Italian planners - a series of desperate improvizations against Allies who could draw on global resources and against whom Italy proved helpless. This remarkable book rightly shows the centrality of Italy to the war, outlining the brief rise and disastrous fall of the Italian military campaign.

A Companion to Abraham Lincoln

A Companion to Abraham Lincoln

Author: Michael Green Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

Niccolo di Lorenzo della Magna and the Social World of Florentine Printing, ca. 1470-1493

Niccolo di Lorenzo della Magna and the Social World of Florentine Printing, ca. 1470-1493

Author: Lorenz Boeninger Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

A new history of one of the foremost printers of the Renaissance explores how the Age of Print came to Italy. Lorenz Boeninger offers a fresh history of the birth of print in Italy through the story of one of its most important figures, Niccolo di Lorenzo della Magna. After having worked for several years for a judicial court in Florence, Niccolo established his business there and published a number of influential books. Among these were Marsilio Ficino's De christiana religione, Leon Battista Alberti's De re aedificatoria, Cristoforo Landino's commentaries on Dante's Commedia, and Francesco Berlinghieri's Septe giornate della geographia. Many of these books were printed in vernacular Italian. Despite his prominence, Niccolo has remained an enigma. A meticulous historical detective, Boeninger pieces together the thorough portrait that scholars have been missing. In doing so, he illuminates not only Niccolo's life but also the Italian printing revolution generally. Combining Renaissance studies' traditional attention to bibliographic and textual concerns with a broader social and economic history of printing in Renaissance Italy, Boeninger provides an unparalleled view of the business of printing in its earliest years. The story of Niccolo di Lorenzo furnishes a host of new insights into the legal issues that printers confronted, the working conditions in printshops, and the political forces that both encouraged and constrained the publication and dissemination of texts.

Political Thought in the French Wars of Religion

Political Thought in the French Wars of Religion

Author: Sophie (University of Oxford) Nicholls Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

Through its close, critical reading of the political treatises and polemical literature produced in France in the sixteenth century, this book offers a valuable new contribution to the intellectual history of the Early Modern era. Sophie Nicholls analyses the political thought of the theologians and jurists in the Holy League as they pursued their crusade against heresy in the French kingdom, during the wars of religion (1562-1629). Contemporaries portrayed the Leaguers as rebellious anarchists, who harboured dangerously democratic ideas. In contrast, Nicholls demonstrates that the intellectuals in the movement were devoted royalists, who had more in common with their moderate counterparts, the 'politiques'. In paying close attention to the conceptual language of politics in this era, this book shows how jurists and theologians in the League presented visions of sovereignty that subtly replenished medieval ideas of kingship and priesthood, and endeavoured to replace them with a new synthesis of intellectual tradition and political power. In a period when 'the state' was still emerging as an idea, analysing League thought in the context of Jesuit and Second Scholastic sources positions the Leaguers in relation to innovative attempts in European Catholic circles to re-think the nature of belonging to a political community.

Conquering Peace

Conquering Peace

Author: Stella Ghervas Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

A bold new look at war and diplomacy in Europe that traces the idea of a unified continent in attempts since the eighteenth century to engineer lasting peace. Political peace in Europe has historically been elusive and ephemeral. Stella Ghervas shows that since the eighteenth century, European thinkers and leaders in pursuit of lasting peace fostered the idea of European unification. Bridging intellectual and political history, Ghervas draws on the work of philosophers from Abbe de Saint-Pierre, who wrote an early eighteenth-century plan for perpetual peace, to Rousseau and Kant, as well as statesmen such as Tsar Alexander I, Woodrow Wilson, Winston Churchill, Robert Schuman, and Mikhail Gorbachev. She locates five major conflicts since 1700 that spurred such visionaries to promote systems of peace in Europe: the War of the Spanish Succession, the Napoleonic Wars, World War I, World War II, and the Cold War. Each moment generated a spirit of peace among monarchs, diplomats, democratic leaders, and ordinary citizens. The engineers of peace progressively constructed mechanisms and institutions designed to prevent future wars. Arguing for continuities from the ideals of the Enlightenment, through the nineteenth-century Concert of Nations, to the institutions of the European Union and beyond, Conquering Peace illustrates how peace as a value shaped the idea of a unified Europe long before the EU came into being. Today the EU is widely criticized as an obstacle to sovereignty and for its democratic deficit. Seen in the long-range perspective of the history of peacemaking, however, this European society of states emerges as something else entirely: a step in the quest for a less violent world.

Exhuming Franco

Exhuming Franco

Author: Sebastiaan Faber Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/04/2021

What is left of Francisco Franco's legacy in Spain today? Franco ruled Spain as a military dictator from 1939 until his death in 1975. In October 2019, his remains were removed from the massive national monument in which they had been buried for forty-four years. For some, the exhumation confirmed that Spain has long been a modern, consolidated democracy. The reality is more complicated. In fact, the country is still deeply affected by the dictatorial legacies of Francoism. In one short volume, Exhuming Franco covers all major facets of the Francoist legacy today, combining research and analysis with reportage and interviews. This book is critical of Spanish democracy; yet, as the final chapter makes clear, Spain is one of many countries facing difficult questions about a conflictive past. To make things worse, the rise of a new, right-wing nationalist revisionism across the West threatens to undo much of the progress made in the past couple of decades when it comes to issues of historical justice.

The Book of Geoffroi de Charny - with the Livre Charny

The Book of Geoffroi de Charny - with the Livre Charny

Author: Ian Wilson, Nigel Bryant Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/04/2021

The poem known as the Livre Charny (Charny's Book), by the 14th century French knight Geoffroi de Charny, has never been published, Nigel Bryant's brilliant new translation of this long-neglected poem, based on a hitherto overlooked original Charny manuscript housed in Oxford, vividly conveys Charny's self-deprecating and extraordinarily down-to-earth attitudes towards the knightly career. Charny is surprisingly blunt in his descriptions of the mishaps and mortal dangers to be expected, from losing in a tournament, to homesickness on crusade, to being concussed whilst attempting to scale an enemy tower. Nothing else quite like it is to be found in medieval literature. Ian Wilson's introduction provides a markedly revised understanding of Charny's career as tournament performer, serving soldier, crusader, councillor, and finally royal standard-bearer: he was killed at Poitiers in 1356. Bryant and Wilson also argue that Charny's Book is so different in style from the Book of Chivalry, also attributed to him. Using the evidence of a hitherto unnoticed manuscript in Madrid, They show that the latter is likely to be a work of the 1380s composed by Charny's son of the same name, possibly as a kind of memorial to his heroic father.

Ich bin Indianer

Ich bin Indianer

Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/04/2021

An Indian knows no pain and is true to his word. The red man is spiritual, proud, fearless-and never laughs. Stereotypes about Native Americans have established themselves in the collective memory of Central European society since the nineteenth century. These myths-reinforced especially by Karl May novels, Buffalo Bill Wild West shows, or Western films-are, however, contrary to the history of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, as well as to the conditions today on reservations. For the project I Am an Indian the photographer Kurt Prinz and the journalist Clemens Marschall visited a variety of hobbyists' Indian cultures in Germany, Austria, and the Czech Republic. The Indian identities experienced there could hardly be more diverse, as they range from historically precise reenactments, to esoteric interpretations in the field of self-help, to playful weekend activities for the whole family. Here is a view into an eccentric subculture.