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General & world history

See below for a selection of the latest books from General & world history category. Presented with a red border are the General & world history books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great General & world history books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Who Invented Oscar Wilde?

Who Invented Oscar Wilde?

Author: David Newhoff Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/11/2020

On December 14, 1883, a short article in the New York Times featured the headline, Did Sarony Invent Oscar Wilde? It was a sarcastic reference to opening arguments presented the day before at the U.S. Supreme Court in Burrow-Giles Lithographic v. Sarony over the infringement of Napoleon Sarony's photograph, Oscar Wilde No. 18. The unlicensed use of the image was one made for advertising, and because Wilde's lecture tour was anticipated with a certain amount of buzz, the mood conveyed by No. 18 seemed like an opportunity for the Erich Brothers Department Store in Manhattan to promote its collection of men's hats. The actual infringer, the Burrow-Giles Lithographic Company, which printed 85,000 trade cards bearing the image, argued that no photograph should ever be protected by copyright because there is no author who is writing the finished work - a reference to the intellectual property clause of the U.S. Constitution. The decision in Sarony came nineteen years after Congress added photographic works to the protected tems under the copyright act, and at a time when many people - including quite a few photographers - were not exactly sure they considered the medium to be the least bit creative. Beginning with a lighthearted overview of copyright history, from the so-called first copyright case in sixth-century Ireland to the establishment of copyright in the new United States, David Newhoff orients the reader toward a basic understanding of pretechnological copyright law. In telling the story of Sarony's own development as an artist, Newhoff presents an underexamined biography concurrent with the development of the photographic medium itself. Sarony's personal development from lithographer to photographer represents a broader historic transition, from a time when social, political, and current events were conveyed through manual image-making to the first era when these events were depicted by machine-made images assumed to represent infallible truth. The shift in the way people perceived the world by the 1880s warrants fresh consideration in the context of the various effects of social media and the omnipresence of cameras capturing trillions of moments - from profoundly important events to mundane intimacies that might be better left undocumented.

Songs in Dark Times

Songs in Dark Times

Author: Amelia M. Glaser Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/11/2020

A probing reading of leftist Jewish poets who, during the interwar period, drew on the trauma of pogroms to depict the suffering of other marginalized peoples. Between the world wars, a generation of Jewish leftist poets reached out to other embattled peoples of the earth-Palestinian Arabs, African Americans, Spanish Republicans-in Yiddish verse. Songs in Dark Times examines the richly layered meanings of this project, grounded in Jewish collective trauma but embracing a global community of the oppressed. The long 1930s, Amelia M. Glaser proposes, gave rise to a genre of internationalist modernism in which tropes of national collective memory were rewritten as the shared experiences of many national groups. The utopian Jews of Songs in Dark Times effectively globalized the pogroms in a bold and sometimes fraught literary move that asserted continuity with anti-Arab violence and black lynching. As communists and fellow travelers, the writers also sought to integrate particular experiences of suffering into a borderless narrative of class struggle. Glaser resurrects their poems from the pages of forgotten Yiddish communist periodicals, particularly the New York-based Morgn Frayhayt (Morning Freedom) and the Soviet literary journal Royte Velt (Red World). Alongside compelling analysis, Glaser includes her own translations of ten poems previously unavailable in English, including Malka Lee's God's Black Lamb, Moyshe Nadir's Closer, and Esther Shumiatsher's At the Border of China. These poets dreamed of a moment when we could mean we workers rather than we Jews. Songs in Dark Times takes on the beauty and difficulty of that dream, in the minds of Yiddish writers who sought to heal the world by translating pain.

A Cultural History of the Home

A Cultural History of the Home

Author: Dr Amanda (University of Essex, UK) Flather Format: Mixed media product Release Date: 26/11/2020

A Cultural History of the Home provides a comprehensive survey of the domestic space from ancient times to the present. Spanning 2800 years, the six volumes explore how different cultures and societies have established, developed and used the home. It reveals a great deal about how people have lived day-to-day in a range of regions and epochs by providing a historical focus on the location in which they will have spent much of their time: the domestic space. 1. A Cultural History of the Home in Antiquity (800 BCE - 800 CE) 2. A Cultural History of the Home in the Medieval Age (800 - 1450) 3. A Cultural History of the Home in the Renaissance (1450 - 1648) 4. A Cultural History of the Home in the Age of Enlightenment (1648 - 1815) 5. A Cultural History of the Home in the Age of Empire (1815 - 1920) 6. A Cultural History of the Home in the Modern Age (1920 - present) Each volume discusses the same themes in its chapters: 1. The Meaning of the Home 2. Family and Household 3. The House 4. Furniture and Furnishings 5. Home and Work 6. Gender and Home 7. Hospitality and Home 8. Religion and Home This structure offers readers a broad overview of a period within each volume or the opportunity to follow a theme through history by reading the relevant chapter across volumes. Generously illustrated, the full six-volume set combines to present the most detailed survey available on the home in history.

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World since 1600

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World since 1600

To date, war history has focused predominantly on the efforts of and impact of war on male participants. However, this limited focus disregards the complexity of gendered experiences with war and the military. The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World since 1600 investigates how conceptions of gender have contributed to the shaping of military culture, examining the varied ideals and practices that have socially differentiated men and women's wartime experiences. Covering the major periods in warfare since the seventeenth century, The Handbook explores cultural representations of war and the interconnectedness of the military with civil society and its transformations. While principally focusing on the Western world, essays also examine European colonization and its aftermath in Asia, Africa, and Australia. Leading scholars from across the US and Europe here address experiences on the home and battle fronts, attempts to tame warfare through peace movements, and the consequences of participation in the military for citizenship. They also consider postwar cultures, the memories of war, and the challenges faced by female, gay and lesbian soldiers who posed a threat to dominant ideals of military masculinity. The Oxford Handbook of Gender, War, and the Western World since 1600 offers an authoritative account of the intricate relationships between gender, warfare, and military culture across time and space.

What is Medieval History?

What is Medieval History?

Author: John H. Arnold Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/11/2020

Since its first publication in 2007, John H. Arnold's What is Medieval History? has established itself as the leading introduction to the craft of the medieval historian. What is it that medieval historians do? How - and why - do they do it? Arnold discusses the creation of medieval history as a field, the nature of its sources, the intellectual tools used by medievalists, and some key areas of thematic importance from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Reformation. The fascinating case studies include a magical plot against a medieval pope, a fourteenth-century insurrection, and the importance of a kiss exchanged between two tenth-century noblemen. Throughout the book, readers are shown not only what medieval history is, but the cultural and political contexts in which it has been written. This anticipated second edition includes further exploration of the interdisciplinary techniques that can aid medieval historians, such as dialogue with scientists and archaeologists, and addresses some of the challenges - both medieval and modern - of the idea of a 'global middle ages'. What is Medieval History? continues to demonstrate why the pursuit of medieval history is important not only to the present, but to the future. It is an invaluable guide for students, teachers, researchers and interested general readers.

What is Medieval History?

What is Medieval History?

Author: John H. Arnold Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/11/2020

Since its first publication in 2007, John H. Arnold's What is Medieval History? has established itself as the leading introduction to the craft of the medieval historian. What is it that medieval historians do? How - and why - do they do it? Arnold discusses the creation of medieval history as a field, the nature of its sources, the intellectual tools used by medievalists, and some key areas of thematic importance from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Reformation. The fascinating case studies include a magical plot against a medieval pope, a fourteenth-century insurrection, and the importance of a kiss exchanged between two tenth-century noblemen. Throughout the book, readers are shown not only what medieval history is, but the cultural and political contexts in which it has been written. This anticipated second edition includes further exploration of the interdisciplinary techniques that can aid medieval historians, such as dialogue with scientists and archaeologists, and addresses some of the challenges - both medieval and modern - of the idea of a 'global middle ages'. What is Medieval History? continues to demonstrate why the pursuit of medieval history is important not only to the present, but to the future. It is an invaluable guide for students, teachers, researchers and interested general readers.

Beyond the Known

Beyond the Known

Author: Andrew Rader Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/11/2020

From brilliant young polymath Andrew Rader - an MIT-credentialled scientist, popular podcast host and SpaceX mission manager - an illuminating chronicle of exploration that spotlights humans' insatiable desire to continually push into new and uncharted territory, from civilisation's earliest days to current planning for interstellar travel. For the first time in history, the human species has the technology to destroy itself. But having developed that power, humans are also able to leave Earth and voyage into the vastness of space. After millions of years of evolution, we've arrived at the point where we can settle other worlds and begin the process of becoming multi-planetary. How did we get here? What does the future hold for us? Divided into four accessible sections, Beyond the Known examines major periods of discovery and rediscovery, from Classical Times, when Phoenicians, Persians and Greeks ventured forth; to The Age of European Exploration, which saw colonies sprout on nearly every continent; to The Era of Scientific Inquiry, when researchers developed brand new tools for mapping and travelling further; to Our Spacefaring Future, which unveils plans currently underway for settling other planets and, eventually, travelling to the stars. A Mission Manager at SpaceX with a light, engaging voice, Andrew Rader is at the forefront of space exploration. As a gifted historian, Rader, who has won global acclaim for his stunning breadth of knowledge, is singularly positioned to reveal the story of human exploration that is also the story of scientific achievement. Told with an infectious zeal for travelling beyond the known, Beyond the Known illuminates how very human it is to emerge from the cave and walk towards an infinitely expanding horizon.

Ruin and Renewal

Ruin and Renewal

Author: Paul Betts Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/11/2020

In 1945, Europe lay in ruins - its cities and towns destroyed by conflict, its economies crippled, its societies ripped apart by war and violence. In the years that followed, Europeans tried to make sense of what had happened - and to forge a new understanding of civilisation that would bring peace and progress to a broken continent. As they wrestled with questions great and small - from the legacy of colonialism to workplace etiquette - institutions and shared ideals emerged which still shape our world today. Drawing on original sources as well as individual stories and voices, this is a gripping and authoritative account of how Europe rebuilt itself - and what we, in the twenty-first century, could lose again.

Ruptured Lives

Ruptured Lives

Growing directly out of the experiences of a team of historians at Washington State University who designed a new foundational course for WSU's common requirements, the Roots of Contemporary Issues series is built on the premise that students will be better at facing current and future challenges, no matter their major or career path, if they are capable of addressing controversial and pressing issues in mature, reasoned ways using evidence, critical thinking, and clear written and oral communication skills. To help students achieve these goals, each title in the Roots of Contemporary Issues series argues that we need both a historical understanding and an appreciation of the ways in which humans have been interconnected with places around the world for decades and even centuries. Much of the world's politics revolves around questions about refugees and other migrating peoples, including debating the scope and limits of humanitarianism; the relevance of national borders in a globalized world; racist rhetoric and policies; global economic inequalities; and worldwide environmental disasters. There are no easy answers to these questions, but the decisions that all of us make about them will have tremendous consequences for individuals and for the planet in the future. Ruptured Lives works from the premise that studying the history of refugee crises can help us make those decisions more responsibly. Examining conflicts-in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Africa-that have produced migrations of people fleeing dangers or persecution, it aims to provide an intellectual framework for understanding how to think about the conflicts that produce refugees and the effects that refugee crises have on individuals and societies.

Past Mistakes

Past Mistakes

Author: David Mountain Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/11/2020

Our museums are full of pure white Classical sculptures. Over the years, we've ignored evidence that they were originally painted bright colours, 'restoring' sculptures to a gleaming white and becoming heated about the very idea of a lick of paint. Why? Because the stories we tell about our past affect how we see ourselves today. Just one wrong turn in our understanding of history can infect whole areas of thought - as well as how we look at society and relate to others in the 21st century. Exploring some of the biggest myths, mysteries and misconceptions about the past (Columbus didn't discover America, the Vandals weren't vandals, Boudicca wasn't English), David Mountain reveals how ongoing revolutions in history and archaeology are finally shedding light on the truth. We discover how prejudices, hoaxes and misinterpretations have whitewashed entire chapters of history, dismissed and demonised female leaders, and invented entire civilisations. Past Mistakes will make you reconsider your notion of what is and isn't 'history' - and why it matters now.

The National Security League, 1914-1922

The National Security League, 1914-1922

Author: Kerry Segrave Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/10/2020

The early 20th century saw the founding of the National Security League, a nationalistic nonprofit organization committed to an expanded military, conscripted service, and meritocracy. This book details its history, from its formation in December 1914 through 1922, at which point it was a spent force in decline. Founded by wealthy corporate lawyers based in New York City, it had secret backers in the capitalist class, who had two goals in mind. One was to profit immensely from the newly begun World War I. The other was to control the working classes in times of both war and peace. This agenda was presented to the public under the guise of preparedness, patriotism, and Americanization. Although eventually convicted by Congress of having violated election spending limits no sanctions of any kind were ever applied. This history details the secret machinations of an organization dedicated to solidifying the grip of the capitalist class over workers, all undercover of American pride.

Hitler's New Disorder

Hitler's New Disorder

Author: Stevan K. Pavlowitch Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/10/2020

The history of the Second World War in Yugoslavia was for a long time the preserve of the Communist regime led by Marshal Tito. It was written by those who had battled hard to come out on top of the many-sided war fought across the territory of that Balkan state after the Axis Powers had destroyed it in 1941, just before Hitler's invasion of the USSR. It was an ideological and ethnic war under occupation by rival enemy powers and armies, between many insurgents, armed bands and militias, for the survival of one group, for the elimination of another, for belief in this or that ideology, for a return to an imagined past within the Nazi New Order, or for the reconstruction of a new Yugoslavia on the side of the Allies. In fact, many wars were fought alongside, and under cover of, the Great War waged by the Allies against Hitler's New Order which, in Yugoslavia at least, turned out to be a 'new disorder'. Most surviving participants have since told their stories; most archival sources are now available. Pavlowitch uses them, as well as the works of historians in several languages, to understand what actually happened on the ground. He poses more questions than he provides answers, as he attempts a synoptic and chronological analysis of the confused yet interrelated struggles fought in 1941-5, during the short but tragic period of Hitler's failed 'New Order', over the territory that was no longer the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and not yet the Federal Peoples' Republic of Yugoslavia, but that is now definitely 'former Yugoslavia'.