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First World War fiction

See below for a selection of the latest books from First World War fiction category. Presented with a red border are the First World War fiction books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great First World War fiction books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

To the Slaughterhouse

To the Slaughterhouse

Author: Jean Giono Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/11/2003

Long regarded as one of France's most distinguished writers, Jean Giono (1895-1970) produced one of his finest novels in TO THE SLAUGHTERHOUSE. The book describes the effect of the First World War on a small community in Provence in chilling detail. In some of the most fiercely realistic and horrifying scenes of war ever recreated in literature, Giono evokes the harsh, primitive conditions in the trenches, as well as the loneliness and anxiety experienced by those left at home. The gradual disintegration of normal life and morals in areas far from the fighting grimly parallels the wholesale destruction of men, land andanimals at the front. - Giono's cult best-seller The Man who Planted Trees has sold more than 50,000 copies, and has been filmed, as well as appearing on BBC Radio 4 and on stage - Giono is the author of more than thirty other works including the play The Horseman on the Roof - A committed pacifist, Giono hid dissidents during the Second World War, and was imprisoned by the Vichy government from 1944-1945

The Wars

The Wars

Author: Timothy Findley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/08/2001

Robert Ross, a sensitive nineteen-year-old Canadian officer, went to war - the War to End All Wars. He found himself in the nightmare world of trench warfare; of mud and smoke, of chlorine gas and rotting corpses. In this world gone mad, Robert Ross performed a last desperate act to declare his commitment to life in the midst of death.The Wars is quite simply one of the best novels ever written about the First World War.

No More Parades

No More Parades

Author: Ford Madox Ford Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/10/2000

No More Parades is the second novel in Ford Madox Ford's series of four novels depicting the meeting, courtship, and ultimate fulfillment of two modern heroes, Christopher Tietjens and Valentine Wannop, despite social condemnation, personal travails, and World War I. Ford poured his own experiences as writer, lover, and soldier into these novels. No More Parades finds Christopher with the army in France. His efforts are going unrewarded, his wife is raising a scandal about him, and his love for Valentine Wannop has been buried deep beneath layers of responsibility. At the novel's climax, he must undergo extended interrogation to avoid a court-martial on charges of striking a superior officer, and that same morning his command is to be subjected to a formal inspection. Through Ford's eyes we see war and romance as wrapped in an irrational embrace.

Through the Wheat

Through the Wheat

Author: Thomas Boyd, Edwin Howard Simmons Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/2000

Fresh out of a Defiance, Ohio, high school, Thomas Boyd (1898-1935) joined the Marines to serve his country in the patriotic heat of the spring of 1917. In 1919 he came home from the war with a Croix de Guerre and a desire to write. He joined the St. Paul News as a journalist and opened a bookstore, whose patrons included F. Scott Fitzgerald and Sinclair Lewis. Through the Wheat appeared to immediate acclaim, with F. Scott Fitzgerald calling it a work of art and arresting. Boyd wrote five other works before he died in Vermont of a cerebral hemorrhage at age thirty-seven.

A Summer without Dawn

A Summer without Dawn

Author: A.J. Hacikyan, Jean-Yves Soucy Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/06/2000

Through the epic story of the Balian family, this work recounts the tragic fate and struggle for survival of the Armenian people during World War I. Vartan Balian scours the Turkish empire in search of his wife Maro and their son, both deported from ancestral lands with tens of thousands of compatriots. Maro and her son manage to escape the ongoing genocide and find shelter in Riza Bey, a wealthy Turkish governor who falls deeply in love with Maro. Almost four years will pass before Vartan and Maro are reunited. Can they overcome the bitterness and doubts of survival and forget each others' intervening relationships: hers with Riza Bey and his with the passionate Aroussiag, who saved him from certain death at the risk of her own life? And what of their son Tomas, who mysteriously disappeared from Riza Bey's home. If he ever returns, would they want him to find safety in a free Armenia - still a dream to them - or in a new life far away in America?

Women, Men and the Great War

Women, Men and the Great War

Author: Trudi Tate Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/11/1995

A wide ranging, challenging and constantly surprising collection ... focusing on the divisions the war created between men and women. Pat Barker This is an anthology of short stories of World War I from 25 classic writers. Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf and Katherine Mansfield are among the women writers whose works account for half the volume. The stories are by turn poignant, violent, harsh, tender and desolating. -- .

A Farewell To Arms

A Farewell To Arms

Author: Ernest Hemingway Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/08/1994

In 1918 Ernest Hemingway went to war, to the 'war to end all wars'. He volunteered for ambulance service in Italy, was wounded and twice decorated. Out of his experiences came his early masterpiece, A Farewell to Arms. In an unforgettable depiction of war, Hemingway recreates the fear, the comradeship, the courage of his young American volunteers and the men and women he encounters along the way with conviction and brutal honesty. A love story of immense drama and uncompromising passion, A Farewell to Arms offers a unique and unflinching view of the world and people, by the winner of the 1954 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Birdsong

Birdsong

Author: Sebastian Faulks Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/07/1994

Set before and during the great war, Birdsong captures the drama of that era on both a national and a personal scale. It is the story of Stephen, a young Englishman, who arrives in Amiens in 1910. Over the course of the novel he suffers a series of traumatic experiences, from the clandestine love affair that tears apart the family with whom he lives, to the unprecedented experiences of the war itself.

A Farewell To Arms

A Farewell To Arms

Author: Ernest Hemingway Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/03/1993

One of Hemingway's finest novels, A FAREWELL TO ARMS was published in 1929 when the author was at the height of his power, It draws on his own experiences serving with the Italins in World War One when he was severely wounded in action and awarded the Croce de Guerra. This is a vivid portrait of men at war which also explores their deeper responses to the cruetly and heroism of Battle

The Patriot's Progress

The Patriot's Progress

Author: Henry Williamson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/1980

This novel of one man's experiences in World War I captures to the full the grim flavour of the ordinary man caught up in a conflict over which he has no control. John Bullock is the archetypal soldier, fighting out of blind patriotism for a cause he does not understand.

Strange Meeting

Strange Meeting

Author: Susan Hill Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/10/1973

Susan Hill's classic novel Strange Meeting tells of the power of love amidst atrocities. 'He was afraid to go to sleep. For three weeks, he had been afraid of going to sleep . . .' Young officer John Hilliard returns to his battalion in France following a period of sick leave in England. Despite having trouble adjusting to all the new faces, the stiff and reserved Hilliard forms a friendship with David Barton, an open and cheerful new recruit who has still to be bloodied in battle. As the pair approach the front line, to the proximity of death and destruction, their strange friendship deepens. But each knows that soon they will be separated . . . 'A remarkable feat of imaginative and descriptive writing' The Times 'The feeling of men under appalling stress at a particular moment in history is communicated with almost uncanny power' Sunday Times 'Truly Astonishing' Daily Telegraph