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Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers

See below for a selection of the latest books from Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers category. Presented with a red border are the Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Make it Work 20th Century American Fiction and Fashion

Make it Work 20th Century American Fiction and Fashion

Author: Jan Ellyn Goggans Format: Hardback Release Date: 06/08/2019

Imagine a new critical theory that bases its literary value on fashion. In this theory exists a community that explores and interrogates conventionality, and in American literature of the 20th century, it includes fashion and home decoration, two paths to achieving white femininity, a prized component of many novels written by and for women. Drawing on cultural materialism and its connection to the cultural forms of objects, including apparel, Making it Work: 20th Century American Fiction and Fashion provides readers a new understanding of the aims of American writers, and the desires of their readers.

Unwilling Executioner Crime Fiction and the State

Unwilling Executioner Crime Fiction and the State

Author: Andrew (Queen's University Belfast, Senior Lecturer in English and American Literature) Pepper Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 04/08/2019

What gives crime fiction its distinctive shape and form? What makes it such a compelling vehicle of social and political critique? Unwilling Executioner argues that the answer lies in the emerging genre's complex and intimate relationship with the bureaucratic state and modern capitalism, and the contradictions that ensue once the state assumes control of the criminal justice system. This study offers a dramatic new interpretation of the genre's emergence and evolution over a three hundred year period and as a genuinely transnational phenomenon. From its roots in the tales of criminality circulated widely in Paris and London in the early eighteenth century, this book examines the extraordinary richness, diversity, and complexity of the genre's subsequent thematizations of crime and policing-moving from France and Britain and from continental Europe and the United States to other parts of the globe. In doing so it offers new ways of reading established crime novelists like Gaboriau, Doyle, Hammett, and Simenon, beyond their national contexts and an impulse to characterize their work as either straightforwardly 'radical' or 'conservative'. It also argues for the centrality of writers like Defoe, Gay, Godwin, Vidocq, Morrison, and more recently Manchette, Himes, and Sjoewall and Wahloeoe to a project where crime and policing are rooted, and shown to be rooted, in the social and economic conditions of their time. These are all deeply political writers even if their novels exhibit no interest in directly promoting political causes or parties. The result is an agile, layered, and far-reaching account of the crime story's ambivalent relationship to the justice system and its move to complicate our understanding of what crime is and how society is policed and for whose benefit.

Metaphors of Confinement The Prison in Fact, Fiction, and Fantasy

Metaphors of Confinement The Prison in Fact, Fiction, and Fantasy

Author: Monika (Professor of English, University of Freiburg) Fludernik Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/08/2019

Metaphors of Confinement: The Prison in Fact, Fiction, and Fantasy offers a historical survey of imaginings of the prison as expressed in carceral metaphors in a range of texts about imprisonment from Antiquity to the present as well as non-penal situations described as confining or restrictive. These imaginings coalesce into a 'carceral imaginary' that determines the way we think about prisons, just as social debates about punishment and criminals feed into the way carceral imaginary develops over time. Examining not only English-language prose fiction but also poetry and drama from the Middle Ages to postcolonial, particularly African, literature, the book juxtaposes literary and non-literary contexts and contrasts fictional and nonfictional representations of (im)prison(ment) and discussions about the prison as institution and experiential reality. It comments on present-day trends of punitivity and foregrounds the ethical dimensions of penal punishment. The main argument concerns the continuity of carceral metaphors through the centuries despite historical developments that included major shifts in policy (such as the invention of the penitentiary). The study looks at selected carceral metaphors, often from two complementary perspectives, such as the home as prison or the prison as home, or the factory as prison and the prison as factory. The case studies present particularly relevant genres and texts that employ these metaphors, often from a historical perspective that analyses development through different periods.

Reading Brendan Behan

Reading Brendan Behan

Author: John McCourt Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/07/2019

Samuel Beckett referred to Brendan Behan as the new O'Casey and yet, despite all his international success, despite his enduring popularity, and perhaps because of his fame (and indeed, notoriety), Behan remains a neglected figure in literary criticism today. This is why this new volume edited by leading Irish Studies expert, John McCourt, is so timely. Penned by an impressive group of international scholars, Reading Brendan Behan looks beyond the author's all-too-well-known personality and focuses on what ultimately matters - the writing. Reading Brendan Behan is the first volume in 20 years to focus on Behan's rich and eclectic body of creative works - his poetry and plays in Irish and English, his short stories and his extraordinary autobiographical novel, Borstal Boy. It explores how Behan sought to identify the proper role for the post-independence Irish writer in a country where clerical and political policing and rigid censorship laws allowed little room for artistic manoeuvre. These essays position Behan between the founding father of Irish modernism, James Joyce, and Behan's own generation, bringing him into dialogue with figures such as Flann O'Brien and Martin O'Cadhain. It pays prominent attention to his connections with Irish Republicanism, his formative time in England, his links with theatre directors, such as Joan Littlewood, as well as his engagement with politics and popular culture on both sides of the Irish Sea. These variegated connections make Behan a unique, if initially unlikely, bridge between Britain and Ireland. This volume will set the context in which Behan's works will be read into the future and firmly locate him as a major player in late modernism. While engaging in much close reading, the essays employ a variety of recent critical approaches, among them cultural studies, theatre studies, translation and comparative studies, Post-Colonial theory, Queer theory, and reception studies. Reading Brendan Behan will reinvigorate scholarly interest and renew critical appraisal of one of Ireland's funniest, trickiest, and, at the same time, most serious experimental writers. John McCourt is at the Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Universita di Macerata

Cambridge Companions to Literature The Cambridge Companion to Ian McEwan

Cambridge Companions to Literature The Cambridge Companion to Ian McEwan

Author: Dominic (University of Nottingham) Head Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/07/2019

This Companion showcases the best scholarship on Ian McEwan's work, and offers a comprehensive demonstration of his importance in the canon of international contemporary fiction. The whole career is covered, and the connections as well as the developments across the oeuvre are considered. The essays offer both an assessment of McEwan's technical accomplishments and a sense of the contextual factors that have provided him with inspiration. This volume has been structured to highlight the points of intersection between literary questions and evaluations, and the treatment of contemporary socio-cultural issues and topics. For the more complex novels - such as Atonement - this book offers complementary perspectives. In this respect, The Cambridge Companion to Ian McEwan serves as a prism of interpretation, revealing the various interpretive emphases each of McEwan's more complex works invite, and to show how his various recurring preoccupations run through his career.

Cambridge Companions to Literature The Cambridge Companion to Ian McEwan

Cambridge Companions to Literature The Cambridge Companion to Ian McEwan

Author: Dominic (University of Nottingham) Head Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/07/2019

This Companion showcases the best scholarship on Ian McEwan's work, and offers a comprehensive demonstration of his importance in the canon of international contemporary fiction. The whole career is covered, and the connections as well as the developments across the oeuvre are considered. The essays offer both an assessment of McEwan's technical accomplishments and a sense of the contextual factors that have provided him with inspiration. This volume has been structured to highlight the points of intersection between literary questions and evaluations, and the treatment of contemporary socio-cultural issues and topics. For the more complex novels - such as Atonement - this book offers complementary perspectives. In this respect, The Cambridge Companion to Ian McEwan serves as a prism of interpretation, revealing the various interpretive emphases each of McEwan's more complex works invite, and to show how his various recurring preoccupations run through his career.

Literature in Context Thomas Pynchon in Context

Literature in Context Thomas Pynchon in Context

Author: Inger H. (Aarhus Universitet, Denmark) Dalsgaard Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/07/2019

Thomas Pynchon in Context guides students, scholars and other readers through the global scope and prolific imagination of Pynchon's challenging, canonical work, providing the most up-to-date and authoritative scholarly analyses of his writing. This book is divided into three parts. The first, 'Times and Places', sets out the history and geographical contexts both for the setting of Pynchon's novels and his own life. The second, 'Culture, Politics and Society', examines twenty important and recurring themes which most clearly define Pynchon's writing - ranging from ideas in philosophy and the sciences to humor and pop culture. The final part, 'Approaches and Readings', outlines and assesses ways to read and understand Pynchon. Consisting of Forty-four essays written by some of the world's leading scholars, this volume outlines the most important contexts for understanding Pynchon's writing and helps readers interpret and reference his literary work.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Romantic Women Writers

The Ashgate Research Companion to Romantic Women Writers

Author: Ann R (Texas Tech University, USA) Hawkins, Maura Ives Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/07/2019

Recovery efforts in the last 25 years have dramatically expanded our understanding of the numbers of women in the Romantic book trade. Responding to the need for a guide to this important field, The Ashgate Research Companion to Romantic Women Writers provides scholars with a comprehensive introduction to the critical currents of women writers who have already garnered substantive attention and identifies writers who are deserving of further study. In addition to essays focused on individual authors, the Companion includes topical essays relating to the economic, material, and social contexts of women's writing during the period.

Crime Fiction in the Global Era

Crime Fiction in the Global Era

Author: Christiana Gregoriou Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/07/2019

David Mitchell Contemporary Critical Perspectives

David Mitchell Contemporary Critical Perspectives

Author: Wendy (Brunel University London, UK) Knepper Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/07/2019

David Mitchell is one of the most critically acclaimed authors in contemporary global writing. Novels such as Ghostwritten, Cloud Atlas and The Bone Clocks demonstrate the author's dazzling literary technique in an oeuvre that crosses genres, genders and borders, moving effortlessly through time and space. David Mitchell: Contemporary Critical Perspectives brings together leading scholars of contemporary fiction to guide readers through the full range of the author's writings, including discussions of all of his novels to-date plus his shorter fictions, essays and libretti. As well as offering extended coverage of Mitchell's most popular work, Cloud Atlas, the authors explore Mitchell's genre-hopping techniques, world-making aesthetics, and engagements with key contemporary issues such as globalization, empire, the environment, disability, trauma and technology. In addition, this book includes an expansive interview with David Mitchell as well as a guide to further reading to help students and readers alike explore the works of this tremendously inventive writer.

The Fontane Workshop Manufacturing Realism in the Industrial Age of Print

The Fontane Workshop Manufacturing Realism in the Industrial Age of Print

Author: Petra S. (Dartmouth College, USA) McGillen Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/07/2019

With an innovative approach that combines material media history, media theory, and literary poetics, this book reconstructs the great German writer Theodor Fontane's creative process. Petra McGillen follows Fontane into the engine room of his text production. Analyzing a wealth of unexplored archival evidence--which includes a collection of the author's 67 extant notebooks, along with an array of other paper tools, such as cardboard boxes, envelopes, and slips--McGillen demonstrates how Fontane compiled his realist prose works. That is, he assembled them from premediated sources, literally with scissors and glue, in an extraordinarily inorganic and radically intertextual manner that turned writing into a process of ongoing remix. By exploring the far-reaching implications of Fontane's creative practices for our understanding of his authorship, originality, and poetics, this book opens up a completely new way to think about his works and, by extension, 19th-century literary realism. This conceptualization of authors' notebooks as creative tools makes a substantial contribution to scholarship on the history of writing media in several disciplines, from German studies and literary studies to media history, and to our understanding of the relationship between mass media and literary creativity in the late 19th century.

John le Carre and the Cold War

John le Carre and the Cold War

Author: Toby (University of Birmingham, UK) Manning Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/07/2019

John le Carre and the Cold War explores the historical contexts and political implications of le Carre's major Cold-War novels. The first in-depth study of le Carre this century, this book analyses his work in light of key topics in 20th-century history, including containment of Communism, decolonization, the Berlin Wall, the Cuban missile crisis, the Cambridge spy-ring, the Vietnam War, the 70s oil crisis and Thatcherism. Examining The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963), Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1974), Smiley's People (1979) and other novels, this book offers an illuminating picture of Cold-War Britain, while situating le Carre's work alongside that of George Orwell, Graham Greene and Ian Fleming. Providing a valuable contribution to contemporary understandings of both British spy fiction and post-war fiction, Toby Manning challenges the critical consensus to reveal a considerably less radical writer than is conventionally presented.