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Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers

See below for a selection of the latest books from Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers category. Presented with a red border are the Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Author's Effects On Writer's House Museums

The Author's Effects On Writer's House Museums

Author: Nicola J. (Professor of English Literature, Open University) Watson Format: Hardback Release Date: 09/01/2020

The Author's Effects: On the Writer's House Museum is the first book to describe how the writer's house museum came into being as a widespread cultural phenomenon across Britain, Europe, and North America. Exploring the ways that authorship has been mythologised through the conventions of the writer's house museum, The Author's Effects anatomises the how and why of the emergence, establishment, and endurance of popular notions of authorship in relation to creativity. It traces how and why the writer's bodily remains, possessions, and spaces came to be treasured in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as a prelude to the appearance of formal writer's house museums. It ransacks more than 100 museums and archives to tell the stories of celebrated and paradigmatic relics-Burns' skull, Keats' hair, Petrarch's cat, Poe's raven, Bronte's bonnet, Dickinson's dress, Shakespeare's chair, Austen's desk, Woolf's spectacles, Hawthorne's window, Freud's mirror, Johnson's coffee-pot and Bulgakov's stove, amongst many others. It investigates houses within which nineteenth-century writers mythologised themselves and their work-Thoreau's cabin and Dumas' tower, Scott's Abbotsford and Irving's Sunnyside. And it tracks literary tourists of the past to such long-celebrated literary homes as Petrarch's Arqua, Rousseau's Ile St Pierre, and Shakespeare's Stratford to find out what they thought and felt and did, discovering deep continuities with the redevelopment of Shakespeare's New Place for 2016.

Faulkner's Media Romance

Faulkner's Media Romance

This book treats William Faulkner's major fiction-from Flags in the Dust through to Absalom, Absalom!-to a searching reappraisal under the spotlight of a media-historical inquiry. It proposes that Faulkner's inveterate attraction to the paradigms of romance was disciplined and masked by the recurrent use of metaphorical figures borrowed from the new media ecology. Faulkner dressed up his romance materials in the technological garb of radio, gramophony, photography, and cinema, along with the transportational networks of road and air that were being installed in the 1920s. His modernism emerges from a fraght but productive interplay between his anachronistic predilection for chivalric chiches and his extraordinarily knowledgeable interest in the most up-to-date media institutions and forms. Rather than see Faulkner as a divided author, who worked for money in the magazines and studios while producing his serious fiction in despite of their symbolic economies, this study demonstrates how profoundly his mature art was shot through with the figures and dynamics of the materials he publicly repudiated. The result is a richer and more nuanced understanding of the dialectics of his art.

When Novels Were Books

When Novels Were Books

Author: Jordan Alexander Stein Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/01/2020

A literary scholar explains how eighteenth-century novels were manufactured, sold, bought, owned, collected, and read alongside Protestant religious texts. As the novel developed into a mature genre, it had to distinguish itself from these similar-looking books and become what we now call literature. Literary scholars have explained the rise of the Anglophone novel using a range of tools, from Ian Watt's theories to James Watt's inventions. Contrary to established narratives, When Novels Were Books reveals that the genre beloved of so many readers today was not born secular, national, middle-class, or female. For the first three centuries of their history, novels came into readers' hands primarily as printed sheets ordered into a codex bound along one edge between boards or paper wrappers. Consequently, they shared some formal features of other codices, such as almanacs and Protestant religious books produced by the same printers. Novels are often mistakenly credited for developing a formal feature ( character ) that was in fact incubated in religious books. The novel did not emerge all at once: it had to differentiate itself from the goods with which it was in competition. Though it was written for sequential reading, the early novel's main technology for dissemination was the codex, a platform designed for random access. This peculiar circumstance led to the genre's insistence on continuous, cover-to-cover reading even as the media platform it used encouraged readers to dip in and out at will and read discontinuously. Jordan Alexander Stein traces this tangled history, showing how the physical format of the book shaped the stories that were fit to print.

Why Women Read Fiction The Stories of Our Lives

Why Women Read Fiction The Stories of Our Lives

Author: Helen (Emeritus Professor of English, University of Exeter) Taylor Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/01/2020

Ian McEwan once said, 'When women stop reading, the novel will be dead.' This book explains how precious fiction is to contemporary British women readers, and how they draw on it to tell the stories of their lives. Female readers are key to the future of fiction and-as parents, teachers, and librarians-the glue for a literate society. Women treasure the chance to read alone, but have also gregariously shared reading experiences and memories with mothers, daughters, grandchildren, and female friends. For so many, reading novels and short stories enables them to escape and to spread their wings intellectually and emotionally. This book, written by an experienced teacher, scholar of women's writing, and literature festival director, draws on over 500 interviews with and questionnaires from women readers and writers. It describes how, where, and when British women read fiction, and examines why stories and writers influence the way female readers understand and shape their own life stories. Taylor explores why women are the main buyers and readers of fiction, members of book clubs, attendees at literary festivals, and organisers of days out to fictional sites and writers' homes. The book analyses the special appeal and changing readership of the genres of romance, erotica, and crime. It also illuminates the reasons for British women's abiding love of two favourite novels, Pride and Prejudice and Jane Eyre. Taylor offers a cornucopia of witty and wise women's voices, of both readers themselves and also writers such as Hilary Mantel, Helen Dunmore, Katie Fforde, and Sarah Dunant. The book helps us understand why-in Jackie Kay's words-'our lives are mapped by books.'

Little Faith

Little Faith

Author: Nickolas Butler Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/01/2020

'This is storytelling at its finest.' USA Today 'Heart-stoppingly good.' Willy Vlautin 'Subtle and heartfelt . . . Wonderful.' Big Issue 'A heart-wrenching look at family and the American mid-west.' Stylist Lyle and his wife, Peg, are living a mostly contented life in rural Wisconsin. Their daughter, Shiloh, after some troubled years has finally come home, with their five-year-old grandson, Isaac. But while away, Shiloh became deeply involved with the pastor of an extremist church in a nearby town, who is convinced that Isaac has the ability to heal the sick. Struggling with his own faith, and with his growing hostility towards the pastor, Lyle faces the very real threat of losing his daughter and beloved grandson once again.

Criminal Moves Modes of Mobility in Crime Fiction

Criminal Moves Modes of Mobility in Crime Fiction

Author: Jesper Gulddal Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/12/2019

Criminal Moves: Modes of Mobility in Crime Fiction offers a major intervention into contemporary theoretical debates about crime fiction. It seeks to overturn the following preconceptions: that the genre does not warrant critical analysis, that genre norms and conventions matter more than textual individuality, and that comparative perspectives are secondary to the study of the British-American canon. Criminal Moves challenges the distinction between literary and popular fiction and proposes that crime fiction be seen as constantly violating its own boundaries. Centred on three axes of mobility, the essays ask how can we imagine a mobile reading practice that realizes the genre's full textual complexity, without being limited by the authoritative self-interpretations provided by crime narratives; how we can overcome restrictive notions of `genre', `formula' or `popular'; and how we can establish transnational perspectives that challenge the centrality of the British-American tradition and recognize that the global history of crime fiction is characterized, not by the existence of parallel national traditions, but rather by processes of appropriation and transculturation. Criminal Moves presents a comprehensive reinterpretation of the history of the genre that also has profound ramifications for how we read individual crime fiction texts.

Nineteenth-Century American Women's Serial Novels

Nineteenth-Century American Women's Serial Novels

Author: Dale M. (University of Illinois) Bauer Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/12/2019

Nineteenth-Century American Women's Serial Novels explores the prolific careers of four exemplary novelists - E. D. E. N. Southworth, Ann Stephens, Mary Jane Holmes, and Laura Jean Libbey. These commercially successful writers helped to shape the popular tradition of serial magazine fiction by drawing on readers' tastes along with their cultural concerns. Their astonishing productivity led magazine editors and publishers to return to them repeatedly for more serials to be turned into even more novels, even as they reprinted these fictions under new titles. Dale M. Bauer analyzes how serials deployed the repetition of plots and the traumas representing the sources of women's anxieties and pain. Arguing that these novels provided temporary resolutions to the social, economic, and psychological tensions that readers faced, Bauer explains how this otherwise forgotten archive of fiction now offers an extraordinarily expanded range of women's literary effort from the nineteenth to the twentieth century.

Rough Beasts The Monstrous in Irish Fiction, 1800-2000

Rough Beasts The Monstrous in Irish Fiction, 1800-2000

Author: Jack Fennell Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/12/2019

Monsters and other supernatural malefactors disrupt the human world in distinct ways: werewolves and cunning beasts challenge the philosophical distinction between human and animal; demons offer deceptive pacts to prey upon our delusions of mastery over the world; capricious fairies claim dominion over the landscape and exact disproportionate revenge for our intrusions. When a monster appears, human history must halt until it departs. Irish history, meanwhile, has been punctured by dramatic ruptures, such as the Great Famine of 1845 to 1849. Monstrous imagery flourishes in these ruptures, so it is hardly surprising that Irish literature boasts a great many rough beasts and ravenous corpses. In this book, various monsters from Irish literature are considered in different historical contexts, to illustrate the role of horror and monstrosity in Ireland's history and culture. In both English- and Irish-language texts, from the Act of Union to the death of the Celtic Tiger, hordes of night-creatures arise in times of crisis, embodying chaos and absurdity. Building upon the critical framework established in Irish Science Fiction (2014), this study looks at the specific ways in which ghosts, malevolent magicians, shape-shifters, cryptids and the corporeal undead oppose human agency by `breaking history'.

Dreaming of Freedom in South Africa Literature Between Critique and Utopia

Dreaming of Freedom in South Africa Literature Between Critique and Utopia

Author: David Johnson Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/12/2019

Focusing on well-known and obscure literary texts from the 1880s to the 1970s, as well as the many manifestos and programmes setting out visions of the future, this book charts the dreams of freedom of five major traditions of anti-colonial and anti-apartheid resistance: the African National Congress, the Industrial and Commercial Workers Union, the Communist Party of South Africa, the Non-European Unity Movement and the Pan-Africanist Congress. More than an exercise in historical excavation, Dreaming of Freedom in South Africa raises challenging questions for the post-apartheid present.

Overwriting Chaos Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's Fictive Worlds

Overwriting Chaos Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's Fictive Worlds

Author: Richard Tempest Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/12/2019

Richard Tempest examines Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's evolution as a literary artist from his early autobiographical novel Love the Revolution to the experimental mega-saga The Red Wheel, and beyond. Tempest shows how this author gives his characters a presence so textured that we can readily imagine them as figures of flesh and blood and thought and feeling. The study discusses Solzhenitsyn's treatment of Lenin, Stalin, and the Russian revolution; surprising predilection for textual puzzles and games a la Nabokov or even Borges; exploration of erotic themes; and his polemical interactions with Russian and Western modernism. Also included is new information about the writer's life and art provided by his family, as well as Tempest's interviews with him in 2003-07.

Wizards, Aliens, and Starships Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction

Wizards, Aliens, and Starships Physics and Math in Fantasy and Science Fiction

Author: Charles L. Adler Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 17/12/2019

Explaining the science behind science fiction and fantasy-from the probable to the impossible From space elevators to interstellar travel, science fiction and fantasy writers have come up with some brilliant, innovative ideas. Yet how plausible are these ideas-for instance, could Mr. Weasley's flying car in the Harry Potter books really exist? Which concepts might happen, and which ones wouldn't work? From the works of Ursula K. Le Guin to Star Trek and Avatar, this book delves into the most extraordinary details in science fiction and fantasy-such as time warps, shape changing, and rocket launches-and shows readers the physics and math behind the phenomena.

Re-Enchanted The Rise of Children's Fantasy Literature in the Twentieth Century

Re-Enchanted The Rise of Children's Fantasy Literature in the Twentieth Century

Author: Maria Sachiko Cecire Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 17/12/2019

From The Hobbit to Harry Potter, how fantasy harnesses the cultural power of magic, medievalism, and childhood to re-enchant the modern world Why are so many people drawn to fantasy set in medieval, British-looking lands? This question has immediate significance for millions around the world: from fans of Lord of the Rings, Narnia, Harry Potter, and Game of Thrones to those who avoid fantasy because of the racist, sexist, and escapist tendencies they have found there. Drawing on the history and power of children's fantasy literature, Re-Enchanted argues that magic, medievalism, and childhood hold the paradoxical ability to re-enchant modern life. Focusing on works by authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, Susan Cooper, Philip Pullman, J. K. Rowling, and Nnedi Okorafor, Re-Enchanted uncovers a new genealogy for medievalist fantasy-one that reveals the genre to be as important to the history of English studies and literary modernism as it is to shaping beliefs across geographies and generations. Maria Sachiko Cecire follows children's fantasy as it transforms over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries-including the rise of diverse counternarratives and fantasy's move into high-brow literary fiction. Grounded in a combination of archival scholarship and literary and cultural analysis, Re-Enchanted argues that medievalist fantasy has become a psychologized landscape for contemporary explorations of what it means to grow up, live well, and belong. The influential Oxford School of children's fantasy connects to key issues throughout this book, from the legacies of empire and racial exclusion in children's literature to what Christmas magic tells us about the roles of childhood and enchantment in Anglo-American culture. Re-Enchanted engages with critical debates around what constitutes high and low culture during moments of crisis in the humanities, political and affective uses of childhood and the mythological past, the anxieties of modernity, and the social impact of racially charged origin stories.