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Shakespeare studies & criticism

See below for a selection of the latest books from Shakespeare studies & criticism category. Presented with a red border are the Shakespeare studies & criticism books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Shakespeare studies & criticism books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Remediating Shakespeare in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Remediating Shakespeare in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

Author: Howard Marchitello Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/09/2019

Remediating Shakespeare in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries analyzes literary remediations of Shakespeare's works, particularly those written for young readers. This book explores adaptations, revisions, and reimaginings by Lewis Theobald, the Bowdlers, the Lambs, and Mary Cowden Clarke, among others, to provide a theoretical account of the poetics and practices of remediating literary texts. Considering the interplay between the historical fascination with Shakespeare and these practices of adaptation, this book examines the endless attempt to mediate our relationship to Shakespeare. Howard Marchitello investigates the motivations behind various forms of remediation, ultimately expanding theories of literary adaptation and appropriation.

Shakespeare and Film Theory

Shakespeare and Film Theory

Author: Scott (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA) Hollifield Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/09/2019

From Titus Andronicus and Hamlet to A Midsummer Night's Dream and Venus and Adonis, Shakespeare leads willing readers and forces the unwilling to rethink and re-see their world through his kaleidoscope of narrative and poetic sources. A wide variety of filmmakers including Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock, Jean-Luc Godard and Akira Kurosawa, Julie Taymor and Quentin Tarantino have tapped into the possibilities Shakespeare's work inspires. This study considers Shakespeare's impact on our experience of words and the images they conjure and considers how this leads to a greater understanding of Shakespeare and the possibilities of cinema and adaptation.

Shakespeare in the Light Essays in Honor of Ralph Alan Cohen

Shakespeare in the Light Essays in Honor of Ralph Alan Cohen

Author: Paul Menzer Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2019

Shakespeare in the Light convenes an accomplished group of scholars, actors, and teachers to celebrate the legacy of renowned Shakespearean and founder of the American Shakespeare Center, Ralph Alan Cohen. Each contributor pivots off a production at the ASC's Blackfriars Playhouse to explore Cohen's abiding passion, the performance of the plays of William Shakespeare under their original theatrical conditions. Whether interested in early modern theatre history, the teaching of Shakespeare to high school students, or the performance of Shakespeare in twenty-first century America, each essay sheds light on the professing of Shakespeare today, whether on the page, on the stage, or in the classroom. Guided by the spirit of universal lighting - so central to the aesthetic of the American Shakespeare Center - Shakespeare in the Light illuminates the impact that the ASC and its founder have made upon the teaching, editing, scholarship, and performance of Shakespeare today.

Shakespeare | Cut Rethinking cutwork in an age of distraction

Shakespeare | Cut Rethinking cutwork in an age of distraction

In distracted times like the present, Shakespeare too has been driven to distraction. Shakespeare | Cut considers contemporary practices of cutting up Shakespeare in stage productions, video games, book sculptures, and YouTube postings, but it also takes the long view of how Shakespeare's texts have been cut apart in creative ways beginning in Shakespeare's own time. The book's five chapters consider cuts, cutting, and cutwork from a variety of angles: (1) as bodily experiences, (2) as essential parts of the process whereby Shakespeare and his contemporaries crafted scripts, (3) as units in perception, (4) as technologies situated at the interface between 'figure' and 'life,' and (5) as a fetish in western culture since 1900. Printed here for the first time are examples of the cut-ups that William S. Burroughs and Brion Guysin carried out with Shakespeare texts in the 1950s. Bruce R. Smith's original analysis is accompanied by twenty-four illustrations, which suggest the multiple media in which cutwork with Shakespeare has been carried out.

Imagining Cleopatra Performing Gender and Power in Early Modern England

Imagining Cleopatra Performing Gender and Power in Early Modern England

Author: Yasmin (Independent Scholar) Arshad Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/08/2019

Shakespeare's characterization of Cleopatra may dominate the collective consciousness, but he was only one of several 16th-century writers fascinated by the enigmatic queen of Egypt. Early modern conceptions of Cleopatra offer a rich, complex, and variable set of models for understanding the period's responses to race, female sovereignty, and classical antiquity. This interdisciplinary study investigates images of Cleopatra in the early modern period and examines how her story was mediated and used - from drawing lessons from history to being a symbol of female heroism. It draws on early historiographical works, political and philosophical treatises, coterie dramatic productions, and gender, race and performance studies, as well as evidence from material culture, to consider what was known and thought about Cleopatra in the period This book provides a new literary and cultural history of one of the world's most contested and politically-charged iconic female figures. It combines a close reading of literary and dramatic works with historical and political contexts, paying particular attention to the three major early modern Cleopatra plays: Mary Sidney's translation of Robert Garnier's Marc Antoine, Samuel Daniel's The Tragedie of Cleopatra, and Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra. By examining these conflicting historical and fictional identities, Yasmin Arshad offers a diverse and ground-breaking study of Cleopatra's `infinite variety'.

Much Ado About Nothing: A Critical Reader

Much Ado About Nothing: A Critical Reader

Author: Deborah (De Montfort University, UK) Cartmell Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

This volume offers an accessible and thought-provoking guide to this major Shakespearean comedy, surveying its key themes and evolving critical preoccupations. It also provides a detailed and up-to-date history of the play's rich stage and screen performance, looking closely at major contemporary performances, including Josie Rourke's film starring David Tennant and Catherine Tate, Vanessa Redgrave and James Earl Jones at the Old Vic, and the RSC's recent rebranding of it as a sequel. Moving through to four new critical essays, the guide opens up fresh perspectives, including contemporary directors' deployment of older actors within the lead roles, the play's relationship to Love's Labour's Lost, its presence on Youtube and the ways in which tales and ruses in the play belong to a wider concern with varieties of crime. The volume finishes with a guide to critical, web-based and production-related resources and an annotated bibliography provide a basis for further research.

Temporality, Genre and Experience in the Age of Shakespeare Forms of Time

Temporality, Genre and Experience in the Age of Shakespeare Forms of Time

Author: Lauren (Villanova University, USA) Shohet Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

Focusing on Shakespeare and his contemporaries, these original essays by leading scholars explore how theatrical, aesthetic, and linguistic forms engage early modern experiences of temporality. Encompassing comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, some contributions consider how different models of pastness, presentness, sequentiality, memory, and historical meaning underwrite particular representational practices. Others, conversely, investigate how aesthetic forms afforded diverse ways for early-modern people to understand or experience time - and how this can impact us today.

Antipodal Shakespeare Remembering and Forgetting in Britain, Australia and New Zealand, 1916 - 2016

Antipodal Shakespeare Remembering and Forgetting in Britain, Australia and New Zealand, 1916 - 2016

Despite a recent surge of critical interest in the Shakespeare Tercentenary, a great deal has been forgotten about this key moment in the history of the place of Shakespeare in national and global culture - much more than has been remembered. This book offers new archival discoveries about, and new interpretations of, the Tercentenary celebrations in Britain, Australia and New Zealand and reflects on the long legacy of those celebrations. This collection gathers together five scholars from Britain, Australia and New Zealand to reflect on the modes of commemoration of Shakespeare across the hemispheres in and after the Tercentenary year, 1916. It was at this moment of remembering in 1916 that `global Shakespeare' first emerged in recognizable form. Each contributor performs their own `antipodal' reading, assessing in parallel events across two hemispheres, geographically opposite but politically and culturally connected in the wake of empire.

Shakespeare and the 'Live' Theatre Broadcast Experience

Shakespeare and the 'Live' Theatre Broadcast Experience

Author: Pascale (University of Exeter, UK) Aebischer Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

This ground breaking collection of essays is the first to examine the phenomenon of how, in the twenty-first century, Shakespeare has been experienced as a `live' or `as-live' theatre broadcast by audiences around the world. Shakespeare and the 'Live' Theatre Broadcast Experience explores the precursors of this phenomenon and its role in Shakespeare's continuing globalization. It considers some of the most important companies that have produced such broadcasts since 2009, including NT Live, Globe on Screen, RSC Live from Stratford-upon-Avon, Stratford Festival HD, Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company Live, and Cheek by Jowl, and examines the impact these broadcasts have had on branding, ideology, style and access to Shakespeare for international audiences. Contributors from around the world reflect on how broadcasts impact on actors' performances, changing viewing practices, local and international Shakespearean fan cultures and the use of social media by audience members for whom liveness is increasingly tied up in the experience economy. The book tackles vexing questions regarding the `presentness' and `liveness' of performance in the 21st century, the reception of Shakespeare in a globally-connected environment, the challenges of sustaining an audience for stage Shakespeare, and the ideological implications of consuming theatre on screen. It will be crucial reading for scholars of the `live' theatre broadcast, and enormously helpful for scholars of Shakespeare on screen and in performance more broadly.

Shakespeare, Objects and Phenomenology Daggers of the Mind

Shakespeare, Objects and Phenomenology Daggers of the Mind

Author: Susan Sachon Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/08/2019

This book explores ways in which Shakespeare's writing strategies shape our embodied perception of objects - both real and imaginary - in four of his plays. Taking the reader on a series of perceptual journeys, it engages in an exciting dialogue between the disciplines of phenomenology, cognitive studies, historicist research and modern acting techniques, in order to probe our sentient and intuitive responses to Shakespeare's language. What happens when we encounter objects on page and stage; and how we can imagine that impact in performance? What influences might have shaped the language that created them; and what do they reveal about our response to what we see and hear? By placing objects under the phenomenological lens, and scrutinising them as vital conduits between lived experience and language, this book illuminates Shakespeare's writing as a rich source for investigation into the way we think, feel and communicate as embodied beings.

Turn-taking in Shakespeare

Turn-taking in Shakespeare

Oxford Textual Perspectives is a series of informative and provocative studies focused upon literary texts (conceived of in the broadest sense of that term) and the technologies, cultures, and communities that produce, inform, and receive them. It provides fresh interpretations of fundamental works and of the vital and challenging issues emerging in English literary studies. By engaging with the materiality of the literary text, its production, and reception history, and frequently testing and exploring the boundaries of the notion of text itself, the volumes in the series question familiar frameworks and provide innovative interpretations of both canonical and less well-known works. Whenever people talk to one another there are at least two things going on at once. First, and most obviously, there is an exchange of speech. Second, and slightly less obviously, there is a negotiation about how that exchange is organised-about whose turn it is to talk at any given moment. Linguists call this second, organisational level of activity 'turn-taking' and since the late 1970s it has been central to the way in which spoken interaction is understood. In spite of its obvious relevance to the study of drama, however, turn-taking has received little attention from critics and editors of Shakespeare. Turn-taking in Shakespeare offers a fresh perspective on the dramatic text by reversing the priorities of traditional literary analysis. Rather than focussing on what characters say, it focuses on when they speak. Rather than focussing on how they talk, it focuses on how they gain access to the floor. Its central argument is that the turn-taking patterns of Shakespeare's plays are a part of what Emrys Jones has called their 'basic structural shaping'-as fundamental to dialogue as rhythm is to verse. The book investigates what it means for a character to speak in or out of turn, to interrupt or overlap with a previous speaker, to pause before speaking, or to fail to speak at all. It explores how these moments are-and are not-signalled by the Shakespearean text, how best to describe and understand them, and the implications of such questions for contemporary debates about editing, rhetoric, prosody, and early modern performance practices.

Turn-taking in Shakespeare

Turn-taking in Shakespeare

Author: Oliver (Maitre-assistant in early modern English literature University of Geneva) Morgan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/2019

Oxford Textual Perspectives is a series of informative and provocative studies focused upon literary texts (conceived of in the broadest sense of that term) and the technologies, cultures, and communities that produce, inform, and receive them. It provides fresh interpretations of fundamental works and of the vital and challenging issues emerging in English literary studies. By engaging with the materiality of the literary text, its production, and reception history, and frequently testing and exploring the boundaries of the notion of text itself, the volumes in the series question familiar frameworks and provide innovative interpretations of both canonical and less well-known works. Whenever people talk to one another there are at least two things going on at once. First, and most obviously, there is an exchange of speech. Second, and slightly less obviously, there is a negotiation about how that exchange is organised-about whose turn it is to talk at any given moment. Linguists call this second, organisational level of activity 'turn-taking' and since the late 1970s it has been central to the way in which spoken interaction is understood. In spite of its obvious relevance to the study of drama, however, turn-taking has received little attention from critics and editors of Shakespeare. Turn-taking in Shakespeare offers a fresh perspective on the dramatic text by reversing the priorities of traditional literary analysis. Rather than focussing on what characters say, it focuses on when they speak. Rather than focussing on how they talk, it focuses on how they gain access to the floor. Its central argument is that the turn-taking patterns of Shakespeare's plays are a part of what Emrys Jones has called their 'basic structural shaping'-as fundamental to dialogue as rhythm is to verse. The book investigates what it means for a character to speak in or out of turn, to interrupt or overlap with a previous speaker, to pause before speaking, or to fail to speak at all. It explores how these moments are-and are not-signalled by the Shakespearean text, how best to describe and understand them, and the implications of such questions for contemporary debates about editing, rhetoric, prosody, and early modern performance practices.