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Literary theory

See below for a selection of the latest books from Literary theory category. Presented with a red border are the Literary theory books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Literary theory books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

After Critique Twenty-First-Century Fiction in a Neoliberal Age

After Critique Twenty-First-Century Fiction in a Neoliberal Age

Periodizing contemporary fiction against the backdrop of neoliberalism, After Critique identifies a notable turn away from progressive politics among a cadre of key twenty-first-century authors. Through authoritative readings of foundational texts from writers such as Percival Everett, Helena Viramontes, Uzodinma Iweala, Colson Whitehead, Tom McCarthy, and David Foster Wallace, Huehls charts a distinct move away from standard forms of political critique grounded in rights discourse, ideological demystification, and the identification of injustice and inequality. The authors discussed in After Critique register the decline of a conventional leftist politics, and in many ways even capitulate to its demise. As Huehls explains, however, such capitulation should actually be understood as contemporary U.S. fiction's concerted attempt to reconfigure the nature of politics from within the neoliberal beast. While it's easy to dismiss this as post-ideological fantasy, Huehls draws on an array of diverse scholarship-most notably the work of Bruno Latour-to suggest that an entirely new form of politics is emerging, both because of and in response to neoliberalism. Arguing that we must stop thinking of neoliberalism as a set of norms, ideological beliefs, or market principles that can be countered with a more just set of norms, beliefs, and principles, Huehls instead insists that we must start to appreciate neoliberalism as a post-normative ontological phenomenon. That is, it's not something that requires us to think or act a certain way; it's something that requires us to be in and occupy space in a certain way. This provocative treatment of neoliberalism in turn allows After Critique to reimagine our understanding of contemporary fiction and the political possibilities it envisions.

Colours of Loneliness and Other Stories NA

Colours of Loneliness and Other Stories NA

Paramita Satpathy belongs to the second generation of modern fiction writers in Odia. In her career spanning two decades, she has carved out a niche for herself with seven short story collections and a novel to her credit. This work is a collection of 14 short stories written by her that have been selected from four different Odia books to depict the range and diversity of her creative output. The stories in this collection straddle many layers of human experience. They make an honest effort to explore overpowering passions carefully concealed under a veneer of a false confidence. The protagonists in most of the stories are driven to seek a state of euphoria to release these dormant passions in unguarded moments. While some stories deplore the evils of a social system that find expression in 'Children's Day' (sexual abuse of children), or dowry deaths in ('The Ultimate Payment'), others protest the crude invasion of urbanization into the peaceful territory of nature. A striking note of feminism is discernable in stories like 'The Nowhere Nest' and a few others where the women protagonists boldly challenge patriarchy and hypocrisy . Others like 'The Wound', 'Elixir of Love', and 'A Strange Bond', are efforts to dive into the human psyche to unmask the real self, haunted by a sense of guilt, insecurity and frustration.

Contemporary Feminism and Women's Short Stories

Contemporary Feminism and Women's Short Stories

Author: Emma Young Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/08/2019

The short story has received renewed attention and notable popular acclaim in the twenty-first century. This book offers a wide-ranging survey of contemporary women's short stories and introduces a new way of theorising feminism in the genre through the concept of 'the moment'. By considering the prominent themes of motherhood, marriage, domesticity, sexuality, masculinity and femininity, this work engages with a spectrum of issues that are central to feminism today and, in the process, offers insightful new readings of the contemporary short story. Readers will find new perspectives on both canonical as well as lesser-discussed contemporary writers, including Kate Atkinson, Nicola Barker, A.S. Byatt, Aminatta Forna, Victoria Hislop, Jackie Kay, Andrea Levy, Hilary Mantel, Kate Mosse, Mich le Roberts, Ali Smith, Zadie Smith and Rose Tremain. While serving as a comprehensive introduction to the central themes of feminist politics, the study shows what makes the short story a desirable literary vehicle for creatively and critically contributing to feminist debates.

Reading the Times Temporality and History in Twentieth-Century Fiction

Reading the Times Temporality and History in Twentieth-Century Fiction

Author: Randall Stevenson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/08/2019

From the Prime Meridian Conference of 1884 to the celebration of the millennium in 2000; from the fiction of Joseph Conrad to the novels of William Gibson and W.G. Sebald, Reading the Times offers fresh insight into modern narrative. It shows how profoundly the structure and themes of the novel depend on attitudes to the clock and to the sense of history's passage, tracing their origins in technologic, economic and social change. It offers a new and powerful way of understanding the relations of history with narrative form, outlining the development and demonstrating - through incisive analyses of a very wide range of literary texts from late nineteenth to early twenty-first century - their key role in shaping fictional narrative throughout this period. The result is a highly innovative literary history of twentieth-century fiction, based on an inventive, enabling method of understanding literature in relation to history - in terms, in every sense, of its reading of its times.

Fictions of Land and Flesh Blackness, Indigeneity, Speculation

Fictions of Land and Flesh Blackness, Indigeneity, Speculation

Author: Mark Rifkin Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/08/2019

In Fictions of Land and Flesh Mark Rifkin explores the impasses that arise in seeking to connect Black and Indigenous movements, turning to speculative fiction to understand those difficulties and envision productive ways of addressing them. As against efforts to subsume varied forms of resistance into a single framework in the name of solidarity, Rifkin argues that Black and Indigenous political struggles are oriented in distinct ways, following their own lines of development and contestation. Rifkin suggests how the movement between them can be approached as something of a speculative leap in which the terms and dynamics of the one are disoriented in the encounter with the other. Futurist fiction provides a compelling site for exploring such disjunctions. Through analyses of works by Octavia Butler, Walter Mosley, Nalo Hopkinson, Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel, and others, the book illustrates how ideas about fungibility, fugitivity, carcerality, marronage, sovereignty, placemaking, and governance shape the ways Black and Indigenous intellectuals narrate the past, present, and future. In turning to speculative fiction, Rifkin illustrates how speculation as a process provides conceptual and ethical resources for recognizing difference while engaging across it.

Fictions of Land and Flesh Blackness, Indigeneity, Speculation

Fictions of Land and Flesh Blackness, Indigeneity, Speculation

Author: Mark Rifkin Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/08/2019

In Fictions of Land and Flesh Mark Rifkin explores the impasses that arise in seeking to connect Black and Indigenous movements, turning to speculative fiction to understand those difficulties and envision productive ways of addressing them. As against efforts to subsume varied forms of resistance into a single framework in the name of solidarity, Rifkin argues that Black and Indigenous political struggles are oriented in distinct ways, following their own lines of development and contestation. Rifkin suggests how the movement between them can be approached as something of a speculative leap in which the terms and dynamics of the one are disoriented in the encounter with the other. Futurist fiction provides a compelling site for exploring such disjunctions. Through analyses of works by Octavia Butler, Walter Mosley, Nalo Hopkinson, Melissa Tantaquidgeon Zobel, and others, the book illustrates how ideas about fungibility, fugitivity, carcerality, marronage, sovereignty, placemaking, and governance shape the ways Black and Indigenous intellectuals narrate the past, present, and future. In turning to speculative fiction, Rifkin illustrates how speculation as a process provides conceptual and ethical resources for recognizing difference while engaging across it.

This Is Not a Copy Writing at the Iterative Turn

This Is Not a Copy Writing at the Iterative Turn

Author: Kaja (University of Westminster, London, UK) Marczewska Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2019

In This Is Not a Copy, Kaja Marczewska identifies a characteristic `copy-paste' tendency in contemporary culture-a shift in attitude that allows reproduction and plagiarizing to become a norm in cultural production. This inclination can be observed in literature and non-literary forms of writing at an unprecedented level, as experiments with text redefine the nature of creativity. Responding to these transformations, Marczewska argues that we must radically rethink our conceptions of artistic practice and proposes a move away from the familiar categories of copying and originality, creativity and plagiarism in favour of the notion of iteration. Developing the new concept of the Iterative Turn, This Is Not a Copy identifies and theorizes the turn toward ubiquitous iteration as a condition of text-based creative practices as they emerge in response to contemporary technologies. Conceiving of writing as iterative invites us to address a set of new, critical questions about contemporary culture. Combining discussion of literature, experimental and electronic writing, mainstream and independent publishing with debates in 20th- and 21st-century art, contemporary media culture, transforming technologies and copyright laws, This Is Not a Copy offers a timely and urgently needed argument, introducing a unique new perspective on practices that permeate our contemporary culture.

The Humanist (Re)Turn: Reclaiming the Self in Literature

The Humanist (Re)Turn: Reclaiming the Self in Literature

Author: Michael Bryson Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/08/2019

The exciting new book argues for a renewed emphasis on humanism--contrary to the trend of post-humanism, or what Neema Parvini calls the anti-humanism of the last several decades of literary and theoretical scholarship. In this trail-blazing study, Michael Bryson argues for this renewal of perspective by covering literature written in different languages, times, and places, calling for a return to a humanism, which focuses on literary characters and their psychological and existential struggles-not struggles of competition, but of connection, the struggles of fragmented, incomplete individuals for integration, wholeness, and unity.

Animate Literacies Literature, Affect, and the Politics of Humanism

Animate Literacies Literature, Affect, and the Politics of Humanism

Author: Nathan Snaza Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 16/08/2019

In Animate Literacies Nathan Snaza proposes a new theory of literature and literacy in which he outlines how literacy is both constitutive of the social and used as a means to define the human. Weaving new materialism with feminist, queer, and decolonial thought, Snaza theorizes literacy as a contact zone in which humans, nonhuman animals, and nonvital objects such as chairs and paper all become active participants. In readings of classic literature by Kate Chopin, Frederick Douglass, James Joyce, Toni Morrison, Mary Shelley, and others, Snaza emphasizes the key roles affect and sensory experiences play in literacy. Snaza upturns common understandings of literacy and its relations to print media, showing instead how such understandings reinforce dehumanizations linked to the dominant imperialist, heterosexist, and capitalist definitions of the human. The path toward disrupting such exclusionary, humanist frameworks, Snaza contends, resides in formulating alternative practices of literacy and literary study that escape disciplined knowledge production.

Animate Literacies Literature, Affect, and the Politics of Humanism

Animate Literacies Literature, Affect, and the Politics of Humanism

Author: Nathan Snaza Format: Hardback Release Date: 16/08/2019

In Animate Literacies Nathan Snaza proposes a new theory of literature and literacy in which he outlines how literacy is both constitutive of the social and used as a means to define the human. Weaving new materialism with feminist, queer, and decolonial thought, Snaza theorizes literacy as a contact zone in which humans, nonhuman animals, and nonvital objects such as chairs and paper all become active participants. In readings of classic literature by Kate Chopin, Frederick Douglass, James Joyce, Toni Morrison, Mary Shelley, and others, Snaza emphasizes the key roles affect and sensory experiences play in literacy. Snaza upturns common understandings of literacy and its relations to print media, showing instead how such understandings reinforce dehumanizations linked to the dominant imperialist, heterosexist, and capitalist definitions of the human. The path toward disrupting such exclusionary, humanist frameworks, Snaza contends, resides in formulating alternative practices of literacy and literary study that escape disciplined knowledge production.

Political English Language and the Decay of Politics

Political English Language and the Decay of Politics

Author: Thomas (Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of Warwick, UK) Docherty Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 08/08/2019

From post-truth politics to no-platforming on university campuses, the English language has been both a potent weapon and a crucial battlefield for our divided politics. In this important and wide-ranging intervention, Thomas Docherty explores the politics of the English language, its implication in the dynamics of political power and the spaces it offers for dissent and resistance. From the authorised English of the King James Bible to the colonial project of University English Studies, this book develops a powerful history for contemporary debates about propaganda, free speech and truth-telling in our politics. Taking examples from the US, UK and beyond - from debates about the Second Amendment and free-speech on campus, to the Iraq War and the Grenfell Tower fire - this book is a powerful and polemical return to Orwell's observation that a degraded political language is intimately connected to an equally degraded political culture.

Political English Language and the Decay of Politics

Political English Language and the Decay of Politics

From post-truth politics to no-platforming on university campuses, the English language has been both a potent weapon and a crucial battlefield for our divided politics. In this important and wide-ranging intervention, Thomas Docherty explores the politics of the English language, its implication in the dynamics of political power and the spaces it offers for dissent and resistance. From the authorised English of the King James Bible to the colonial project of University English Studies, this book develops a powerful history for contemporary debates about propaganda, free speech and truth-telling in our politics. Taking examples from the US, UK and beyond - from debates about the Second Amendment and free-speech on campus, to the Iraq War and the Grenfell Tower fire - this book is a powerful and polemical return to Orwell's observation that a degraded political language is intimately connected to an equally degraded political culture.