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Plays, playscripts

See below for a selection of the latest books from Plays, playscripts category. Presented with a red border are the Plays, playscripts books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Plays, playscripts books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Paradise

Paradise

Author: Kate Tempest Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/09/2020

Lyricist, novelist, poet and playwright Kate Tempest will make her National Theatre debut in June with Paradise, a potent and dynamic reimagining of the Greek classic Philoctetes by Sophocles. Once comrades, now enemies after Odysseus abandoned Philoctetes to suffer a terrible wound alone, Odysseus is prepared to use any means necessary to get the shell-shocked Philoctetes back to the front and win the Trojan war. Directed by Ian Rickson with Lesley Sharp leading a large ensemble all woman cast.

The Lamplighter

The Lamplighter

Author: Jackie Kay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/08/2020

The Lamplighter takes us on a journey through the dark heart of slavery. Produced both as a radio and stage play, it also reads as a stirring and a multi-layered poem. Four women and one man tell the story of their lives through slavery, from the the fort, to the slave ship, through the middle passage, following life on the plantations, charting the growth of the British city and the industrial revolution. The Lamplighter focuses on parts of history other books rarely touch upon, revealing the devastating human cost of slavery for individual people. Constance has had to witness the sale of her own child; Mary has been beaten to an inch of her life; Black Harriot has had to become a high class whore; and our lead, the Lamplighter was sold twice into slavery from the ports in Bristol. All four very different voices tell their story, in a rousing chorus that speaks to the experiences of all those oppressed by the slave trade, lifting in the end to a soaring and rally conclusion. Radical and widely acclaimed when it was first staged, this groundbreaking play from one of our most beloved poets and writers, Jackie Kay, remains as urgent and daring to this day.

Now You See Her

Now You See Her

Author: Amy Nostbakken, Norah Sadava, Lisa Karen Cox, Raha Javanfar Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/08/2020

Six diverse women's voices merge into one devastating (and funny) portrait of modern feminism. It would be difficult to overstate how brilliantly realized and intricately crafted Now You See Her is. Everything means something, even the most casual choices are revealed to contribute to the braid of the story... If you're not sure what theatre is for anymore, this show will restore your faith in the art form. -- S. Bear Bergman, Mooney on Theatre Now You See Her radiates wit, urgency, and theatricality. --Jose Teodoro, Now Magazine They are the invisible, the vanishing, and the disappeared. In an insurrectionary outburst of original music, words, and movement, the six characters in Now You See Her explore some of the diverse ways women fade from sight in our culture. They sing, dance, and thrust themselves into the elements as they travel through the seasons of their lives. Their voices are defiant. Their question is simple: why and how do we allow our power to disappear without a fight? Now You See Her follows Quote Unquote Collective's acclaimed international hit Mouthpiece.

Red Speedo

Red Speedo

Author: Lucas Hnath Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 04/08/2020

The Obie-winning play by the Tony-nominated playwright of A Doll's House, Part 2 Ray's swum his way to the eve of the Olympic trials. If he makes the team, he'll get a deal with Speedo. If he gets a deal with Speedo, he'll never need a real job. So, when someone's stash of performance-enhancing drugs is found in the locker-room fridge, threatening the entire team's Olympic fate, Ray has to crush the rumors or risk losing everything. Red Speedo is a sharp and stylish play about swimming, survival of the fittest, and the American dream of a level playing field-or of leveling the field yourself.

The Way of the World

The Way of the World

Author: William Congreve Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/07/2020

Hero longing for heiress. Obstacles in the way. Marriage eventually secured. It sounds simple. But the lasting appeal of this, one of the most performed and discussed of all Restoration plays, lies in Congreve's sophisticated grasp of plot, back-story, characterization and language. Set in high-society London, his comic masterpiece features scenes of uproarious comedy, Machiavellian scheming and devastating wit. Its sparring between sexes is enchanting but shadowed by melancholy and the ethical uncertainty latent in the title. If this is the way of the world, are we supposed to cheer, despair, or shrug our shoulders? In this new edition of William Congreve's The Way of the World, David Roberts peels back the layers of the plot to tell the story of the play's stage and critical history from 1700 to the present day, bringing voices from universities and theatres into debate about this enigmatic landmark in English comedy. Supplemented by a plot summary and annotated bibliography, it is ideal for students of Congreve, comedy and early modern drama.

The Renaissance Theatre: Texts, Performance, Design

The Renaissance Theatre: Texts, Performance, Design

Author: Christopher Cairns Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2020

Originally published in 1999, this book is a critical analysis of Renaissance theatre, including chapters on speaking theatres, performing theatre and redesigning Shakespeare.

The Blind Giant is Dancing

The Blind Giant is Dancing

Author: Stephen Sewell Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2020

Bafana Republic and Other Satires

Bafana Republic and Other Satires

Author: Mike van Graan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2020

Bafana Republic and Other Satires is a selection of monologues from a series of one-person satirical revues. Using the 2010 FIFA World Cup as an entry point for satirical commentary, the sketches focus on various issues facing democratic South Africa: state 'vanity' projects, land issues, abuse of women and state capture. In any deeply polarised society, satire provides an effective means for challenging audiences. Van Graan's potent mix of comedy, poetry and drama compels audiences to reflect on controversial topics in a non-alienating, thought-provoking and thoroughly entertaining way. The collection tackles themes of corruption, colonialism, violence against women, AIDS denialism, violent crime, racism and inequality head on. Readers or audience members cannot remain unaffected by the use of humour, exaggeration, irony and ridicule in the sketches to highlight social and political issues and human foibles. They will laugh and cringe and sometimes cry, but ultimately they will appreciate more deeply the beauty and humanity of their country, and perhaps feel recharged with hope. The sketches in the collection come from six one-person revues: Bafana Republic (2007), Bafana Republic: Extra Time (2008), Bafana Republic: Penalty Shootout (2009), Pay Back the Curry (2016), State Fracture (2017) and Land Acts (2018). The compilation can be used as monologues for exam purposes or as acting exercises for drama students, or selections can be made from the sketches to make up one-person shows of varying lengths.

National Theatre Connections 2020

National Theatre Connections 2020

Author: Mojisola Adebayo, Chris Bush, Alison Carr, John Donnelly Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/06/2020

National Theatre Connections is an annual festival which brings new plays for young people to schools and youth theatres across the UK and Ireland. Commissioning exciting work from leading playwrights, the festival exposes actors aged 13-19 to the world of professional theatre-making, giving them full control of a theatrical production - from costume and set design to stage management and marketing campaigns. NT Connections have published over 150 original plays and regularly works with 500 theatre companies and 10,000 young people each year. This anthology brings together 9 new plays by some of the UK's most prolific and current writers and artists alongside notes on each of the texts exploring performance for schools and youth groups. Wind / Rush Generation(s) by Mojisola Adebayo This is a play about the British Isles, its past and its present. Set in a senior common room, in a prominent university, a group of 1st year undergraduates are troubled, not by the weight of their workload, but by a 'noisy' ghost. So they do what any group self-respecting and intelligent university students would do in such a situation - they get out the Ouija Board to confront their spiritual irritant and lay them to rest - only to be confronted by the full weight of Britain's colonial past - in all its gory glory. Fusing naturalism, with physical theatre, spoken-word, absurdism, poetry and direct address - this is event-theatre that whips along with the grace, pace and hypnotic magnetism of a hurricane. Tuesday by Alison Carr Tuesday is light, playful and nuanced in tone. And a little bit sci-fi. The play centres on an ordinary Tuesday that suddenly turns very weird indeed when a tear rips across the sky over the school yard. The play touches on themes of friendship, sibling love, family, identity, grief, bullying, loneliness and responsibility. And in the process we might just learn something about ourselves as well as some astronomical theories of the multiverse! A series of public apologies (in response to an unfortunate incident in the school lavatories) by John Donnelly This satirical play is heightened in its naturalism, in its seriousness, in its parody and piercing in its interrogation of how our attempts to define ourselves in public are shaped by the fear of saying the wrong thing. Presented quite literally as a series of public apologies this play is spacious, flexible and welcoming of inventive and imaginative interpretation as each iteration spirals inevitably to its absurdist core. This is a play on words, on convention, on manners, on institutions, on order, online and on point. THE IT by Vivienne Franzmann THE IT is a play about a teenage girl who has something growing inside her. She doesn't know what it is, but she knows it's not a baby. It expands in her body. It starts in her stomach, but quickly outgrows that, until eventually ittakes over the entirety of her insides. It has claws. She feels them. Presented in the style of a direct to camera documentary, this is a darkly comic state of the nation play exploring adolescent mental health and the rage within, written very specifically for today. The Marxist in Heaven by Hattie Naylor The Marxist in Heaven is a play that does exactly what its title page says it's going to do. The eponymous protagonist 'wakes up' in paradise and once they get over the shock of this fundamental contradiction of everything they believe in.....they get straight back to work....and continue their lifelong struggle for equality and fairness for all....even in death. Funny, playful, provocative, pertinent and jam-packed with discourse, disputes, deities and disco dancing by the bucketful, this upbeat buoyant allegory shines its holy light on globalization and asks the salient questions - who are we and what are we doing to ourselves?.....and what conditioner do you use on your hair? Look Up by Andrew Muir Look Up plunges us into a world free from adult intervention, supervision and protection. It's about seeking the truth for yourself and finding the space to find and be yourself. Nine young people are creating new rules for what they hope will be a new and brighter future full of hope in a world in which they can trust again. Each one of them is unique, original and defiantly individual, break into an abandoned building and set about claiming the space, because that is what they do. They have rituals, they have rules, together they are a tribe, they have faith in themselves....and nothing and no one else. They are the future, unless the real world catches up with them and then all they can hope for is that they don't crash and burn like the adults they ran away from in the first place. Crusaders by Frances Poet A group of teens gather to take their French exam but none of them will step into the exam hall. Because Kyle has had a vision and he'll use anything, even miracles, to ensure his classmates accompany him. Together they have just seven days to save themselves, save the world and be the future. And Kyle is not the only one who has had the dream. All across the globe, from Azerbaijan to Zambia, children are dreaming and urging their peers to follow them to the promised land. Who will follow? Who will lead? Who will make it? Witches Can't Be Burned by Silva Semerciyan St. Paul's have won the schools Playfest competition, three years in a row, by selecting recognised classics from the canon and producing them at an exceptionally high level, it's a tried and trusted formula. With straight A's student and drama freak, Anuka cast as Abigail Williams in The Crucible by Arthur Miller, the school seem to be well on course for another triumph, which would be a record. However, as rehearsals gain momentum, Anuka has an epiphany. An experience resulting in her asking searching questions surrounding the text, the depiction and perception of female characters, the meaning of loyalty, and the values and traditions underpinning the very foundations of the school. Thus, the scene is set for a confrontation of epic proportions as Anuka seeks to break with tradition, before tradition breaks her and all young women like her and reality begins to take on the ominous hue of Miller's fictionalized Salem. Dungeness by Chris Thompson . In a remote part of the UK, where nothing ever happens, a group of teenagers share a safe house for LGBT+ young people. While their shared home welcomes difference, it can be tricky for self-appointed group leader Birdie to keep the peace. The group must decide how they want to commemorate an attack that happened to LGBT+ people, in a country far away. How do you take to the streets and protest if you're not ready to tell the world who you are? If you're invisible, does your voice still count? A play about love, commemoration and protest.

Some Old Black Man

Some Old Black Man

Author: James Anthony Tyler Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/06/2020

WINNER: 2018 Horton Foote Playwriting Award When college professor, Calvin Jones, moves his 82-year-old doggedly independent, blue collar, ailing, father from Greenwald, Mississippi into his Harlem penthouse, an argument over what to eat for breakfast turns into a generational clash over race, opportunity, and a decision that Calvin made years ago. Some Old Black Man premiered at 59E59 Theaters, 59 East 59th St. New York City.

New Russian Drama

New Russian Drama

Author: Richard Schechner Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/06/2020

New Russian Drama took shape at the turn of the new millennium-a time of turbulent social change in Russia and the former Soviet republics. Emerging from small playwriting festivals, provincial theaters, and converted basements, it evolved into a major artistic movement that startled audiences with hypernaturalistic portrayals of sex and violence, daring use of non-normative language, and thrilling experiments with genre and form. The movement's commitment to investigating contemporary reality helped revitalize Russian theater. It also provoked confrontations with traditionalists in society and places of power, making theater once again Russia's most politicized art form. This anthology offers an introduction to New Russian Drama through plays that illustrate the versatility and global relevance of this exciting movement. Many of them address pressing social issues, such as ethnic tensions and political disillusionment; others engage with Russia's rich cultural legacy by reimagining traditional genres and canons. Among them are a family drama about Anton Chekhov, a modern production play in which factory workers compose haiku, and a satirical verse play about the treatment of migrant workers, as well a documentary play about a terrorist school siege and a postdramatic text that is only two sentences long. Both politically and aesthetically uncompromising, they chart new paths for performance in the twenty-first century. Acquainting English-language readers with these vital works, New Russian Drama challenges us to reflect on the status and mission of the theater.