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Classical texts

See below for a selection of the latest books from Classical texts category. Presented with a red border are the Classical texts books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Classical texts books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Ovidian Transversions

Ovidian Transversions

Author: Valerie Traub Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/11/2020

Focuses on transversions of Ovid's 'Iphis and Ianthe' in both English and French literature Medieval and early modern authors engaged with Ovid's tale of 'Iphis and Ianthe' in a number of surprising ways. From Christian translations to secular retellings on the seventeenth-century stage, Ovid's story of a girl's miraculous transformation into a boy sparked a diversity of responses in English and French from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries. In addition to analysing various translations and commentaries, the volume clusters essays around treatments of John Lyly's Galatea (c. 1585) and Issac de Benserade's Iphis et Iante (1637). As a whole, the volume addresses gender and transgender, sexuality and gallantry, anatomy and alchemy, fable and history, youth and pedagogy, language and climate change. Key Features: The only scholarly monograph to focus on Ovid's 'Iphis and Ianthe' Intervenes in the history of Ovidian reception and literary history, particularly in terms of gender and sexuality Broadens readings of 'Iphis and Ianthe' beyond concerns of gender and sexuality Brings medieval and early modern, English and French appropriations of the tale into productive dialogue Provides new readings of John Lyly's Galathea and Issac Benserade's 'Iphis and Ianthe', and of medieval versions of the story Intervenes in the history of 'trans' phenomena

Looking at Ajax

Looking at Ajax

Author: David (Independent Scholar, UK) Stuttard Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/11/2020

Ajax is perhaps the earliest of Sophocles' tragedies, yet the issues at its heart remain profoundly resonant today. Set in the Greek encampment during the siege of Troy, it traces not just the story of a respected war hero's mental breakdown but (like Sophocles' Antigone) the treatment of an enemy's remains and the management of his memory. Pitting the fate of the individual against not just his own community but the cosmic world of the divine, it explores questions of loyalty and power, compassion and control, integrity and political expediency - and ultimately what it is to be human. In Antiquity the fate of Ajax fascinated writers and artists alike. Today it has assumed a new importance with Sophocles' play being used to help treat military veterans suffering from PTSD. This collection of 12 essays by leading academics from across the UK, US and Ireland draws together many of the themes explored in Ajax, from how Sophocles exploits audiences' awareness of mythology and visual arts, to questions of politics and religion, staging and characterization, changing perceptions of the heroic, and the therapeutic use to which the play is put today. The essays are accompanied by David Stuttard's introduction and performer-friendly, accurate and easily accessible English translation.

A Commentary on Demosthenes' Against Androtion

A Commentary on Demosthenes' Against Androtion

This volume provides a detailed, lemmatic, literary commentary on Demosthenes' speech Against Androtion. It is the first study of its kind since the nineteenth century, filling a significant gap in modern scholarship. The Greek text of the speech is accompanied by a facing English translation, making the work more accessible to a wide scholarly audience. It also includes an extensive introduction covering key historical, socio-political, and legal issues. The speech was delivered in a graphe paranomon (a public prosecution for introducing an illegal decree) which was brought against Androtion, a well-established Athenian public speaker and intellectual. Demosthenes composed Against Androtion for Diodoros, the supporting speaker in this trial and an active political figure in the mid-fourth century. In her commentary, Ifigeneia Giannadaki illuminates the legal, socio-political, and historical aspects of the speech, including views on male prostitution and the relationship between sex and politics, complex aspects of Athenian law and procedure, and Athenian politics in the aftermath of the Social War. Giannadaki balances the analysis of important historical and legal issues with a special emphasis on elucidating Demosthenes' rhetorical strategy and argumentation.

Spectres of Antiquity

Spectres of Antiquity

Gothic literature imagines the return of ghosts from the past. But what about the ghosts of the classical past? Spectres of Antiquity is the first full-length study to describe the relationship between Greek and Roman culture and the Gothic novels, poetry, and drama of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Rather than simply representing the opposite of classical aesthetics and ideas, the Gothic emerged from an awareness of the lingering power of antiquity. The Gothic reflects a new and darker vision of the ancient world: no longer inspiring modernity through its examples, antiquity has become a ghost, haunting contemporary minds rather than guiding them. Through readings of works by authors including Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Charles Brockden Brown, and Mary Shelley, Spectres of Antiquity argues that these authors' plots and ideas preserve the remembered traces of Greece and Rome. James Uden provides evidence for many allusions to ancient texts that have never previously been noted in scholarship, and he offers an accessible guide both to the Gothic genre and to the classical world to which it responds. In fascinating and compelling detail, Spectres of Antiquity rewrites the history of the Gothic, demonstrating that the genre was haunted by a far deeper sense of history than has previously been assumed.

The Aeneid

The Aeneid

Author: Shadi Bartsch, Vergil Format: Hardback Release Date: 05/11/2020

On his deathbed in 19 BCE, Vergil asked that his epic, the Aeneid, be burned and not published. If his wishes had been obeyed, western literature - and maybe even western civilization - might have taken a different course. The Aeneid has remained a key text of university courses since the rise of universities, and has been invoked at key points of human history - whether by Saint Augustine to illustrate the fallen nature of the soul, by settlers to justify manifest destiny in North America, or by Mussolini in support of his Fascist regime. In this fresh and fast-paced translation of the Aeneid, Shadi Bartsch brings the poem to the modern reader. Along with the translation, her introduction will guide the reader to a deeper understanding of the epic's enduring influence.

Human Transgression - Divine Retribution: A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions ('Confession Inscriptions')

Human Transgression - Divine Retribution: A Study of Religious Transgressions and Punishments in Greek Cultic Regulation and Lydian-Phrygian Propitiatory Inscriptions ('Confession Inscriptions')

Human Transgression - Divine Retribution analyses pagan concepts of religious transgressions, how they should be regarded and punished, as expressed in Greek cultic regulations from the 5th century BC to the 3rd century AD. Also considered are the so-called propitiatory inscriptions (often referred to as 'confession inscriptions') from the 1st to the 3rd century AD Lydia and Phrygia, in light of 'cultic morality', an ideal code of behaviour intended to make places, occasions, and worshippers suitable for ritual. This code is on the one hand associated with 'purity' (hagneia) and removal of pollution (miasma) caused by deaths, births and sexuality, and on the other with the protection of sacred property. This study seeks to explain the emphasis of divine punishments in the Lydian and Phrygian inscriptions, while rare in most Greek cultic regulations, as part of a continuum within pagan religion rather than as a result of an absolute division between Greek and Oriental religion.

A Commentary on Lysias, Speeches 12-16

A Commentary on Lysias, Speeches 12-16

Lysias was the leading Athenian speech-writer of his generation (403-380 BC), whose speeches form a leading source for all aspects of the history of Athenian society during this period. The current volume focuses on speeches that are important particularly as political texts, during an unusually eventful post-imperial period which saw Athens coming to terms with the aftermath of its eventual defeat in the Peloponnesian War (431-404) plus two traumatic if temporary oligarchic coups (the Four Hundred in 411, and especially the Thirty in 404/3). The speeches are widely read today, not least because of their simplicity of linguistic style. This simplicity is often deceptive, however, and one of the aims of this commentary is to help the reader assess the rhetorical strategies of each of the speeches and the often highly tendentious manipulation of argument. This volume includes the text of speeches 12 to 16 (reproduced from Christopher Carey's 2007 Oxford Classical Texts edition, including the apparatus criticus), with a new facing English translation. Each speech receives an extensive introduction, covering general questions of interpretation and broad issues of rhetorical strategy, while in the lemmatic section of the commentary individual phrases are examined in detail, providing a close reading of the Greek text. To maximize accessibility, the Greek lemmata are accompanied by translations, and individual Greek terms are mostly transliterated. This is a continuation of the projected multi-volume commentary on the speeches and fragments begun with the publication of speeches 1 to 11 in 2007, which will be the first full commentary on Lysias in modern times.

Simonides: Epigrams and Elegies

Simonides: Epigrams and Elegies

Simonides of Ceos, one of the nine lyric poets enshrined in what is conventionally thought of as the Hellenistic Lyric Canon, is a relatively mysterious figure despite his renown in the classical world. Few historical and biographical facts about him have survived, and only fragments of his non-epigrammatic poetry. This volume is intended to complement Orlando Poltera's full-scale text and commentary on Simonides' lyrics (Schwabe, 2008), offering an up-to-date edition and commentary covering, for the most part, those poems in elegiac distichs now called epigrams and elegies. In addition to these forms, Simonides wrote in a few other non-lyric metrical patterns involving dactyls and iambs: these are also included for the sake of completeness, since they are properly absent from Poltera's edition. As authenticity is in question for all but a very few of the epigrams ascribed to Simonides, the volume's scope extends to cover every poem ascribed to him in antiquity, including some poems that are surely not by him: these poems have never before been treated in such detail and the large body of scholarship generated by the corpus as a whole is taken into account here for the first time. Each poem and fragment is accompanied by a new English translation, where applicable, and detailed exegetic line-by-line commentary; a comprehensive general Introduction sets Simonides and his works into their historical context and provides a thorough examination of the textual transmission of the elegies and epigrams.

Vyasa Redux

Vyasa Redux

Author: Kevin McGrath Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2020

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

Author: Charlotte Bronte Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/09/2020

Jane Eyre is a vivid and powerful novel, and tells the story of Jane, a cruelly abused orphan who is cast out by her aunt, and sent to a charity school. When she becomes a governess, in an austere mansion owned by Mr Rochester, Jane's life begins to change as she discovers the terrible secret her employer is hiding. This novel is one of the most read classic novels. This edition is retold by John Kennett, and contains the key elements of the story using the author's language.

Critica

Critica

Author: Egil (University of Oslo, Norway) Kraggerud Format: Hardback Release Date: 04/09/2020

Gathering together over 60 new and revised discussions of textual issues, this volume represents notorious problems in well-known texts from the classical era by authors including Horace, Ennius, and Vergil. A follow-up to Vegiliana: Critical Studies on the Texts of Publius Vergilius Maro (2017), the volume includes major contributions to the discussion of Horace's Carmen IV 8 and IV 12, along with studies on Catullus Carmen 67 and Hadrian's Animula vagula, as well as a new contribution on Livy's text at IV 20 in connection with Cossus's spolia opima, and on Vergil's Aeneid 3. 147-152 and 11. 151-153. On Ennius, the author presents several new ideas on Ann. 42 Sk. and 220-22l, and in editing Horace, he suggests new principles for the critical apparatus and tries to find a balance by weighing both sides in several studies, comparing a conservative and a radical approach. Critica will be an important resource for students and scholars of Latin language and literature.

Cicero's Catilinarians

Cicero's Catilinarians

Author: D. H. (Senior Lecturer in Classics, Senior Lecturer in Classics, University of Edinburgh) Berry Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/09/2020

The Catilinarians are a set of four speeches that Cicero, while consul in 63 BC, delivered before the senate and the Roman people against the conspirator Catiline and his followers. Or are they? Cicero did not publish the speeches until three years later, and he substantially revised them before publication, rewriting some passages and adding others, all with the aim of justifying the action he had taken against the conspirators and memorializing his own role in the suppression of the conspiracy. How, then, should we interpret these speeches as literature? Can we treat them as representing what Cicero actually said? Or do we have to read them merely as political pamphlets from a later time? In this, the first book-length discussion of these famous speeches, D. H. Berry clarifies what the speeches actually are and explains how he believes we should approach them. In addition, the book contains a full and up-to-date account of the Catilinarian conspiracy and a survey of the influence that the story of Catiline has had on writers such as Sallust and Virgil, Ben Jonson and Henrik Ibsen, from antiquity to the present day.