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Classical texts

See below for a selection of the latest books from Classical texts category. Presented with a red border are the Classical texts books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Classical texts books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Miscellanies, Volume 2

Miscellanies, Volume 2

Author: Angelo Poliziano Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/03/2020

Angelo Poliziano (1454-1494) was one of the great scholar-poets of the Italian Renaissance and the leading literary figure of Florence in the age of Lorenzo de' Medici, il Magnifico. The poet's Miscellanies, including a first century published in 1489 and a second century unfinished at his death, constitute the most innovative contribution to classical philology of the Renaissance. Each chapter is a mini-essay on some lexical or textual problem which Poliziano, drawing on the riches of the Medici Library and Lorenzo's collection of antiquities, solves with his characteristic mixture of deep learning, analytic skill, and brash criticism of his predecessors. Volume 1 presents a new Latin edition of The First Century of the Miscellanies, and these volumes together present the first translation of both collections into any modern language.

The Inferno

The Inferno

Author: Ciaran Carson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/03/2020

'Quite simply the best version of Dante there is' PAUL MULDOON, Irish Times. Almost eight centuries after its first publication, Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy remains an icon of Italian literature and of the epic genre. In Inferno, the first volume, the poet Virgil leads Dante's hero through hell, showing him the inhabitants of each of its nine circles and examples of the divine justice meted out to them. In this beautifully produced Apollo Library edition, Ciaran Carson's translation suffuses the text with wit, anger and irreverent vigour, without diminishing the pathos of the original. This is a retelling of Dante's epic journey for the twenty-first-century reader.

Sophocles: Oedipus the King A New Verse Translation

Sophocles: Oedipus the King A New Verse Translation

Oedipus the King is the best-known play we have from the pen of Sophocles and was recognized as a masterpiece in Aristotle's Poetics, which cites the play more often than any other as an example of how to write tragedy. The principal character is the king of a city ravaged by a mysterious plague, who consults Apollo at Delphi and is told that the plague will end only when those who killed the previous king, Laius, are found and punished. He launches an investigation, in the course of which he learns not only that he is himself the killer, but that Laius was his father and Laius' widow, whom he married, his own mother. As a result of this revelation Oedipus changes from being a respected king and conscientious investigator into a polluted and self-blinded outcast. This volume presents a highly-polished English verse translation of Sophocles' powerful play which renders both the beauty of his language and the horror of the events being dramatized. A detailed introduction and notes clearly elucidate how the plot is constructed and the meaning this construction implies, as well as how Sophocles ably concealed the fact that his characters act in ways which differ from what we expect in real life. It also addresses influential misinterpretations, thereby offering an accessible and authoritative introduction to the play that will be of benefit to a wide range of readers.

Sophocles: Oedipus the King A New Verse Translation

Sophocles: Oedipus the King A New Verse Translation

Oedipus the King is the best-known play we have from the pen of Sophocles and was recognized as a masterpiece in Aristotle's Poetics, which cites the play more often than any other as an example of how to write tragedy. The principal character is the king of a city ravaged by a mysterious plague, who consults Apollo at Delphi and is told that the plague will end only when those who killed the previous king, Laius, are found and punished. He launches an investigation, in the course of which he learns not only that he is himself the killer, but that Laius was his father and Laius' widow, whom he married, his own mother. As a result of this revelation Oedipus changes from being a respected king and conscientious investigator into a polluted and self-blinded outcast. This volume presents a highly-polished English verse translation of Sophocles' powerful play which renders both the beauty of his language and the horror of the events being dramatized. A detailed introduction and notes clearly elucidate how the plot is constructed and the meaning this construction implies, as well as how Sophocles ably concealed the fact that his characters act in ways which differ from what we expect in real life. It also addresses influential misinterpretations, thereby offering an accessible and authoritative introduction to the play that will be of benefit to a wide range of readers.

Philodemus: On Poems, Book 2 With the fragments of Heracleodorus and Pausimachus

Philodemus: On Poems, Book 2 With the fragments of Heracleodorus and Pausimachus

The On Poems by Philodemus of Gadara (c.110-35 BC), the Epicurean philosopher and poet who taught Vergil and influenced Horace, is our main source for Hellenistic literary and critical theory, bridging the gap between Aristotle and Horace. In Book 2 Philodemus rebuts two almost unknown critics, Heracleodorus and Pausimachus, who argued, respectively, that the sound arising from the word-order (synthesis) is the source of poetic excellence, regardless of the content and word-choice, and that the pure sound of the vowels and consonants, which vary in quality, is that source. By putting together fragments from both the summary and the rebuttal of these theorists, we can form a full picture of their thought. Philodemus led the Augustan reaction against this invasion of literary criticism by musical theory, arguing that form and content are interrelated, and that well-expressed content, not pretty sound, is what makes poetry worthwhile. Book 2 reveals just how much and how inventively Horace drew on the ideas of all three writers in composing his Ars Poetica. The extensive remains of this scroll, carbonized in the eruption of Vesuvius, were thoroughly jumbled after their rediscovery in the Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum. This edition painstakingly reconstructs their original sequence according to new methods, while exploiting previously unknown manuscript sources and technologies for ordering and reading the extant pieces. In thus restoring this lengthy aesthetic treatise from antiquity, it makes another major addition to the corpus of classical literature.

Jane Eyre Abridged and Retold, with Notes and Free Audiobook

Jane Eyre Abridged and Retold, with Notes and Free Audiobook

Author: Charlotte Brontë Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/02/2020

Jane Eyre is a vivid and powerful novel, and tells the story of Jane, a cruelly abused orphan who is cast out by her aunt, and sent to a charity school. When she becomes a governess, in an austere mansion owned by Mr Rochester, Jane's life begins to change as she discovers the terrible secret her employer is hiding. This novel is one of the most read classic novels. This edition is retold by John Kennett, and contains the key elements of the story using the author's language.

Batrachomyomachia (Battle of the Frogs and Mice) Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary

Batrachomyomachia (Battle of the Frogs and Mice) Introduction, Text, Translation, and Commentary

The Batrachomyomachia (Battle of the Frogs and Mice) is a Hellenistic pastiche of Homer's Iliad which was often attributed to Homer himself by later commentators. As a parody of epic battle narrative it is quite unlike anything else that survives in full from antiquity; however, despite its popular and influential reception throughout much of history from the Roman period onwards, the advent of the twentieth century saw it largely dismissed and overlooked as a curio. This volume presents a new critical edition of the poem, comprising an introduction, Greek text and English verse translation, and line-by-line commentary, which aims to rehabilitate its image and return it to the centre of scholarly attention by mapping out the wide range of metaliterary jokes, references, and parodies concealed within the apparently simple and childish story. The Greek text is entirely new, based on a fresh collation of the nine most important early manuscripts as well as on the work of previous editors. All verses which appear in these manuscripts are included - those which do not belong in the main text are presented separately at the foot of each page - and are accompanied by a full apparatus criticus and a new facing verse translation, which aims to strike a balance between precision and readability. A comprehensive introduction thoroughly orients readers in the poem's historical and literary context, covering its (highly uncertain) date and disputed authorship, its relationship with the wider genre of 'parody', its language and metre, and its reception and influence up to the present day, among other topics. The commentary forms the largest part of the volume, offering detailed discussion of linguistic, stylistic, and thematic questions, as well as guiding readers through the complex network of references to Homer and Hellenistic poetry and breaking down the textual problems for which the poem is so notorious.

Seneca: Selected Letters

Seneca: Selected Letters

Author: Seneca Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 28/01/2020

The letters of Seneca are uniquely engaging among the works that have survived from antiquity. They offer an urgent guide to Stoic self-improvement but also cast light on Roman attitudes towards slavery, gladiatorial combat and suicide. This selection of letters conveys their range and variety, with a particular focus on letters from the earlier part of the collection. As well as a general introduction, it features a brief introductory essay on each letter, which draws out its themes and sets it in context. The commentary explains the more challenging aspects of Seneca's Latin. It also casts light on his engagement with Stoic (and Epicurean) ideas, on the historical context within which the letters were written and on their literary sophistication. This edition will be invaluable for undergraduate and graduate students and scholars of Seneca's moral and intellectual development.

An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic On the Basis of Recently Discovered Texts

An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic On the Basis of Recently Discovered Texts

Author: Morris, Jr. Jastrow, Albert Tobias Clay Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/12/2019

The epic tale of Gilgamesh is one of the earliest stories in world literature, composed more than four thousand years ago. It survives in fragmentary form in various cuneiform tablets. This 1920 publication presents transliterations and translations of Old Babylonian fragments found since the discovery in the 1850s of shattered clay tablets in the library of King Ashurbanipal (668-627 BCE) at Nineveh by A. H. Layard, and painstakingly pieced together by George Smith (several of whose works have been reissued in this series). Its American editors, Morris Jastrow Jr (1861-1921) and Albert T. Clay (1866-1925) discuss the complicated history of the epic, and the new information gained from more recently discovered sources, chiefly the two related items known respectively as the Pennsylvania and Yale tablets. The epic remains of interest to biblical scholars as well as Assyriologists, since its description of a great flood is reminiscent of the story in Genesis.

Revenge and Gender in Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Literature

Revenge and Gender in Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Literature

Author: Lesel Dawson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/12/2019

Explores the representation of revenge from Classical to early modern literature This collection explores a range of literary and historical texts from ancient Greece and Rome, medieval Iceland and medieval and early modern England to provide an understanding of wider historical continuities and discontinuities in representations of gender and revenge. It brings together approaches from literary criticism, gender theory, feminism, drama, philosophy and ethics to allow greater discussion between these subjects and across historical periods and to provide a more complex and nuanced understanding of the ways in which ideas about gender and revenge interrelate.

Sophocles' Electra

Sophocles' Electra

Author: Hanna M. (Professor of Classics, Professor of Classics, Colby College) Roisman Format: Hardback Release Date: 19/12/2019

Sophocles' Electra is a riveting play with a long and varied reception. Its nuanced treatment of matricidal revenge with all the questions it raises; its compelling depictions of the idealistic, long -grieving, rebellious Electra; her compliant sister; her brother; and her mother; and its superb poetry have all contributed to making this one of Sophocles' most admired plays, as have the moral issues it raises and its political reverberations. In recent decades it has been repeatedly translated, adapted, and produced, sometimes on its own, sometimes in combination with selections from Aeschylus' Libation Bearers and (more often) Euripides' Electra. While the play certainly stands on its own in any language, reading it in the original Greek adds immense value. A commentary on the Greek text would enrich its reading by elucidating the words and world of the ancient language for those who are reading it more than twenty- five hundred years after the play was written. Such a commentary would also contribute to our understanding of other ancient Greek texts, not necessarily because they use the same words in the same way, but by providing information for contrast, comparison, and clarification. This commentary includes an introduction, text and notes, an abbreviations list, a stylistic & metrical terminology list, an appendix of recurrent words, and, a list of irregular verbs and their principal parts.